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8317 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Jul 2020 at 2:05 AM (17 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-07-03 9:33:43 AM  

olderbudnoweiser: Dfuq.


Don't be coming in here with that hijinks
 
2020-07-03 9:36:17 AM  

anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.


Wala!
/s
 
2020-07-03 9:37:35 AM  

Dewey Fidalgo: Mæg ic be me sylfum
soðgied wrecan
siþas secgan,
hu ic geswincdagumed
earfoðhwile
oft þrowade
abitre breostceare
gebiden hæbbe,
gecunnad in ceole


I can about myself a true story reckon.
Something about a journey of hardship and suffering and sorrow ... in a "keel" (which I assume is a poetic way to say, 'ship' )

'
 
2020-07-03 9:45:41 AM  

Dewey Fidalgo: Mæg ic be me sylfum
soðgied wrecan
siþas secgan,
hu ic geswincdagumed
earfoðhwile
oft þrowade
abitre breostceare
gebiden hæbbe,
gecunnad in ceole


Even early modern English is hard to read.
 
2020-07-03 9:45:52 AM  
Just like saying "Here's a free gift" - if it's free then it's a .... oh, crap. Never mind.
 
2020-07-03 9:48:45 AM  
English died the moment we accepted the Latin alphabet.
 
2020-07-03 9:55:38 AM  

Biohazard Banana Suit: if you think "irregardless" is redundant and silly french has "au jour d'aujourd'hui" so dont feel too bad


Belgian Dutch has "dagdagelijks" (day-daily) which I hate with a passion. We don't do that reduplication for weekly or monthly, and as far as I know it isn't used in the Netherlands either.
 
2020-07-03 9:55:55 AM  

waxbeans: Abacus9: waxbeans: Abacus9: waxbeans: Abacus9: waxbeans: Resident Muslim: studebaker hoch: The verbing of nouns.

Sorry, I was mouthing your words, and they floored me.
I'm just helping you in painting the larger picture.

/I have enough issues with people blending words; mansplaining, moobs, etc
//though brunch has become mainstream
///don't brunch myself, though

I never really, really, understood what mansplaining was/is?

But,
The movie I Love You, Daddy

Was/is on YouTube.
And there this sense where CK is explaining something to his daughter. And a massive light bulb was going off. And, I was OMFG this scumbag is mansplaining.

Serious question, have you ever been north of the Mason/Dixon line? Curious, you said you're from Texas, I'm from Michigan, and we couldn't live in more different worlds. Just seeing what the common ground is, you know?

Oh my God I love Auburn hills I want to die in Auburn hills Detroit.

Ok wait what? Auburn Hills isn't in Detroit, and why?

When I went to see Metallica, at the palace in Auburn hills, I loved the hell out of it. The leaves; and the combination of the sun and cold combined to be thid feeling that I described as air conditioning outdoors.
I want to spend my last days there. Oh and Windsor is an amazing cherry on top.

When was this? I saw them there on 12/31/1999 along with Ted Nugent, and (was too late to see Kid Rock or Sevendust - and good! cuz they suck - Kid Rock sux anyway, don't know about the other). It may explain the sun with the outdoor air conditioning (Winter, we call it here). Any why were you in SE Michigan anyway?

OCTOBER 1, 2004, God Smack. Opened.
Always wanted, still want to, fallow Metallica across America. Only managed 3 shows over 14 months.

When I hear winter I think uncomfortable cold.
Not air conditioning, with a warm beam of sun on my face. Did a elk/mousse hunt in Colorado during winter. That was uncomfortable. And not air conditioning. That was cold.


You can always dress warmer. My air conditioner broke in my apartment in 2010 and the thermostat said it was over 120 degrees (that was the far end of the needle, so it could have been hotter), and I'm not sure the damn thing was calibrated properly in the first place, and it was old. But I felt like I was dying, took a quick cold shower every half hour, and drank lots of beer to keep myself cool. Of course, the fridge busted, so I had to then freeze it.
 
2020-07-03 9:58:52 AM  

Graffito: Dewey Fidalgo: Mæg ic be me sylfum
soðgied wrecan
siþas secgan,
hu ic geswincdagumed
earfoðhwile
oft þrowade
abitre breostceare
gebiden hæbbe,
gecunnad in ceole

I can about myself a true story reckon.
Something about a journey of hardship and suffering and sorrow ... in a "keel" (which I assume is a poetic way to say, 'ship' )

'


Why does this remind me of Galavant? I miss that show!
 
2020-07-03 10:06:29 AM  
English died the first time somebody said pre-programmed and nobody killed him.

/ you can't farking post-program, asshole.
 
2020-07-03 10:13:03 AM  

Abacus9: You can always dress warmer. My air conditioner broke in my apartment in 2010 and the thermostat said it was over 120 degrees (that was the far end of the needle, so it could have been hotter), and I'm not sure the damn thing was calibrated properly in the first place, and it was old. But I felt like I was dying, took a quick cold shower every half hour, and drank lots of beer to keep myself cool. Of course, the fridge busted, so I had to then freeze it.


For sure.
Texas here.
Can't take off more clothes once you naked.
I keep the AC at 75
 
2020-07-03 10:13:35 AM  

Abacus9: Graffito: Dewey Fidalgo: Mæg ic be me sylfum
soðgied wrecan
siþas secgan,
hu ic geswincdagumed
earfoðhwile
oft þrowade
abitre breostceare
gebiden hæbbe,
gecunnad in ceole

I can about myself a true story reckon.
Something about a journey of hardship and suffering and sorrow ... in a "keel" (which I assume is a poetic way to say, 'ship' )

'

Why does this remind me of Galavant? I miss that show!


I like the cut of your jib
 
2020-07-03 10:31:28 AM  
Irregardless is a perfectly good word.  It means: "This idiot means regardless"   See?  Now you know the person speaking is an idiot and no further listening is required.
 
2020-07-03 10:49:33 AM  
The most pedantic thread ever!!  Eleventy!!!

/But funny.
 
2020-07-03 10:52:49 AM  

jefferator: aerojockey: I can't think of a single time I've ever heard someone say "irregardless" non-ironically.

LOL I was conducting a very high level meeting with two major corporations the guy who was an Exec VP from HP - who reported to Carly Forina  - used the word 6 times.  We all held our breath, emotions and disdain very professionally.  When we broke from the meeting we all just laughed our asses off...... The guy was a tool.  End of the day........Look what happened to HP.  My Company - Cisco, was good to go (At the time)......


I relate.

While taking a graduate level class to earn my MA in English, one of my very accomplished professors routinely said irregardless. It grated on the nerves of all of us, until someone wrote that on the whiteboard and crossed out the the first two letters before class started. Our laughter was short-lived. The professor walked in and erased the board without even reading it.
 
2020-07-03 10:54:01 AM  

cman: cman: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

Do you care that December is used as the 12th month and not the 10th?

If your gonna get upset about decimate you might as well be consistent.

Addendum

September - "septem" meaning seventh month

October - octo - eight month

November - novem - ninth month

December - decim - tenth month

No one gets upset about how they represent months that dont correspond to their names. So why do some get their panties in a bunch over decimate?


I think the HoE podcast covered this in one of the early episodes.
 
2020-07-03 10:54:42 AM  

Abacus9: psychosis_inducing: in flagrante: Spartapuss: Hoisted on it's own petard.

its!

I've personally never heard anyone use the word 'irregardless' when speaking.  In print, the only time I've come across it is in written diatribes bemoaning the collapse of civilization as we know it....usually written by people who are trying very hard to justify those liberal arts degrees.   I honestly think we're ok here.

Clichéd idioms bother me a lot more than mutated single words.  I could live the rest of my life pretty comfortably if I never heard "at the end of the day" again.  You probably all have your own favourites as well.

I noticed that unless someone is discussing something that happens round twilight time, you can remove "at the end of the day" without losing any meaning at all. You also rarely need to add any placeholder words for grammatical correctness. "At the end of the day" lifts cleanly out.

Incorrect. Much of it comes from religion, in the form of Jewish people ending their day at sunset. Like it or not, that has ingrained itself into American culture via the Christian religion, which is somewhat related. Phrases like "don't let the sun set upon your anger" are examples of this. Maybe educate yourself before speaking next time.


Spoken like someone who hasn't paid attention in a meeting or a class lecture in a long time.

"At the end of the day, we need someone to volunteer to type all these notes so we can file them."
"Yeah, I would love to try your idea but at the end of the day, you have to get it approved first."
"People love to try to save money, but at the end of the day you must consider quality versus price."
"You can try shortcuts to avoid solving this system of equations, but at the end of the day you're going to need to do the math in order to move on to the next step."
"I know housecleaning sucks, but at the end of the day we need to do it or else we will live in filth."
"You may think you smell fine, but at the end of the day if you don't shower before work people will notice."

"At the end of the day, we need someone to volunteer to type all these notes so we can file them."
"Yeah, I would love to try your idea but at the end of the day, you have to get it approved first."
"People love to try to save money, but at the end of the day you must consider quality versus price."
"You can try shortcuts to avoid solving this system of equations, but at the end of the day you're going to need to do the math in order to move on to the next step."
"I know housecleaning sucks, but at the end of the day we need to do it or else we will live in filth."
"You may think you smell fine, but at the end of the day if you don't shower before work people will notice."

Don't worry, you're still very smart. Someday you might learn how phrases sometimes lose their meaning over time and become meaningless filler.
 
2020-07-03 10:57:09 AM  

psychosis_inducing: Abacus9: psychosis_inducing: in flagrante: Spartapuss: Hoisted on it's own petard.

its!

I've personally never heard anyone use the word 'irregardless' when speaking.  In print, the only time I've come across it is in written diatribes bemoaning the collapse of civilization as we know it....usually written by people who are trying very hard to justify those liberal arts degrees.   I honestly think we're ok here.

Clichéd idioms bother me a lot more than mutated single words.  I could live the rest of my life pretty comfortably if I never heard "at the end of the day" again.  You probably all have your own favourites as well.

I noticed that unless someone is discussing something that happens round twilight time, you can remove "at the end of the day" without losing any meaning at all. You also rarely need to add any placeholder words for grammatical correctness. "At the end of the day" lifts cleanly out.

Incorrect. Much of it comes from religion, in the form of Jewish people ending their day at sunset. Like it or not, that has ingrained itself into American culture via the Christian religion, which is somewhat related. Phrases like "don't let the sun set upon your anger" are examples of this. Maybe educate yourself before speaking next time.

Spoken like someone who hasn't paid attention in a meeting or a class lecture in a long time.

"At the end of the day, we need someone to volunteer to type all these notes so we can file them."
"Yeah, I would love to try your idea but at the end of the day, you have to get it approved first."
"People love to try to save money, but at the end of the day you must consider quality versus price."
"You can try shortcuts to avoid solving this system of equations, but at the end of the day you're going to need to do the math in order to move on to the next step."
"I know housecleaning sucks, but at the end of the day we need to do it or else we will live in filth."
"You may think you smell fine, but at the end of the day if you don't shower before work people will notice."

"At the end of the day, we need someone to volunteer to type all these notes so we can file them."
"Yeah, I would love to try your idea but at the end of the day, you have to get it approved first."
"People love to try to save money, but at the end of the day you must consider quality versus price."
"You can try shortcuts to avoid solving this system of equations, but at the end of the day you're going to need to do the math in order to move on to the next step."
"I know housecleaning sucks, but at the end of the day we need to do it or else we will live in filth."
"You may think you smell fine, but at the end of the day if you don't shower before work people will notice."

Don't worry, you're still very smart. Someday you might learn how phrases sometimes lose their meaning over time and become meaningless filler.


Snap.
I'm not say ATEOTD again.
Wow.
 
2020-07-03 10:58:44 AM  

cman: The word "smart" originally meant "pain".


It is still used for "hurt".

"Ouch, that smarts."
"That's got to smart."
 
2020-07-03 11:06:58 AM  
If they're going to accept irregardless, they should also accept the new term:
"moronify: v. 1) To make moronic. 2) To normalize moronic behavior. See also: dumb down."

Language is used to convey information and emotion. "Regardless" is very clear. Adding "ir", a negation prefix (ir-regular, ir-relevant), does what - intensify? Negate?

Changing language to make information-conveyal clearer, to represent new concepts and constructions, is an improvement. Adding it to normalize an error is moronification.
 
2020-07-03 11:08:30 AM  

JungleBoogie: If they're going to accept irregardless, they should also accept the new term:
"moronify: v. 1) To make moronic. 2) To normalize moronic behavior. See also: dumb down."

Language is used to convey information and emotion. "Regardless" is very clear. Adding "ir", a negation prefix (ir-regular, ir-relevant), does what - intensify? Negate?

Changing language to make information-conveyal clearer, to represent new concepts and constructions, is an improvement. Adding it to normalize an error is moronification.


Epic.
 
2020-07-03 11:12:12 AM  

Ker_Thwap: ecmoRandomNumbers: Written language died when teenagers got smart phones.

My lawn. Off it.

My English teacher back in 1976 would disagree with that.


You mean "Worcester".
 
2020-07-03 11:15:14 AM  
Don't get me started on chaise lounge.
 
2020-07-03 11:37:15 AM  
How English sounds to non-English speakers
Youtube Vt4Dfa4fOEY
 
2020-07-03 11:41:56 AM  

LordOfThePings: [YouTube video: How English sounds to non-English speakers]


Get out of my head.

I've always wanted to know this
 
2020-07-03 11:50:44 AM  
8 yrs of high school for nothing.
 
2020-07-03 11:51:45 AM  

Ganon D. Mire: irregardless: Lacking of an eerie guard.
[Fark user image 425x281]


In Boston it means lack of an eerie god.
 
2020-07-03 12:33:13 PM  

HawgWild: It's spelled whoa. I'll never accept woah.

DO YOU HEAR ME?! NEVER!


Okay, Woah Nebster.

/wtf
 
2020-07-03 1:19:16 PM  

Dewey Fidalgo: Mæg ic be me sylfum
soðgied wrecan
siþas secgan,
hu ic geswincdagumed
earfoðhwile
oft þrowade
abitre breostceare
gebiden hæbbe,
gecunnad in ceole


Google translate has failed me.
 
2020-07-03 1:34:27 PM  
i.imgflip.comView Full Size
 
2020-07-03 3:10:44 PM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: Dewey Fidalgo: Mæg ic be me sylfum
soðgied wrecan
siþas secgan,
hu ic geswincdagumed
earfoðhwile
oft þrowade
abitre breostceare
gebiden hæbbe,
gecunnad in ceole

Beowulf? My senior English teacher made us memorize portions of Beowulf in Old English. I have no idea why. She was a total asshole. To me, it was Greek being spoken by sadistic Germans.

But I repeat myself.


The Seafarer.   I love the kenning "whale-road" from the poem, meaning the sea.  Also, from Beowulf, the sea is called the swan-road.  I think that's Beowulf.
 
2020-07-03 3:11:40 PM  

cman: I could care less (yes, that was intentional) what others feel about English

I speak American, so fark y'all.


My mom was the hotel operator for the famous Chateau Frontenac in Quebec City.  At least once a day someone would ask her "Do you speak American?"
 
2020-07-03 3:12:21 PM  

GardenWeasel: cman: The word "smart" originally meant "pain".

It is still used for "hurt".

"Ouch, that smarts."
"That's got to smart."


I smarted your post.

Because it seemed like the right thing to do.
 
2020-07-03 3:13:53 PM  

RedVentrue: HawgWild: It's spelled whoa. I'll never accept woah.

DO YOU HEAR ME?! NEVER!

woah is a horse command.


One of my dad's favourite jokes:

Why do the stop signs in Quebec say "WWT"?

"Woah!  Woah! Tabernac!"
 
2020-07-03 3:16:37 PM  

mrshowrules: cman: I could care less (yes, that was intentional) what others feel about English

I speak American, so fark y'all.

My mom was the hotel operator for the famous Chateau Frontenac in Quebec City.  At least once a day someone would ask her "Do you speak American?"


Please tell me she'd answer "No, but I do speak Canadian".
 
2020-07-03 3:16:43 PM  
"nonplussed" is supposed to mean "surprised of shocked" or roughly that.   However, so many people used it in completely the wrong way.  They used it as meaning not surprised or not shocked.

Anyways, some dictionaries are actually accepting the misuse as a valid definition variant.  That's not right.
 
2020-07-03 3:17:44 PM  

CluelessMoron: mrshowrules: cman: I could care less (yes, that was intentional) what others feel about English

I speak American, so fark y'all.

My mom was the hotel operator for the famous Chateau Frontenac in Quebec City.  At least once a day someone would ask her "Do you speak American?"

Please tell me she'd answer "No, but I do speak Canadian".


She answered "No, but I speak English." but that would have been funnier.
 
2020-07-03 6:17:22 PM  

i ignore u: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: i ignore u: Well yeah, for all intensive porpoises.

[i.ytimg.com image 480x360]

Chomping at the bit

That'll do your teeth in.


Ball headed.
Touting your own horn.
Cutting off your nose, despite your face.
 
2020-07-03 6:18:34 PM  

stuffy: 8 yrs of high school for nothing.


You got laid, didn't you?
 
2020-07-03 9:40:03 PM  

studebaker hoch: stuffy: 8 yrs of high school for nothing.

You got laid, didn't you?


The last 4 years were legally nebulous, though, I think.
 
2020-07-04 4:56:46 AM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: studebaker hoch: stuffy: 8 yrs of high school for nothing.

You got laid, didn't you?

The last 4 years were legally nebulous, though, I think.


That's beside the point.
 
2020-07-04 2:11:26 PM  
media1.tenor.comView Full Size
 
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