Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Twitter)   The English language is officially dead   (twitter.com) divider line
    More: Sad, shot  
•       •       •

8325 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Jul 2020 at 2:05 AM (21 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



342 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2020-07-03 4:02:09 AM  

waxbeans: baron von doodle: waxbeans: Abacus9: waxbeans: Snapper Carr: Language evolves as its speakers change.  The word "irregardless" becomes common parlance, linguists are going to take note - eventually it ends up in the dictionary.

This is how language works.

Latin is dead.  It is unchanging.  No one speaks it outside of jargon from a handful of academic fields.

Exactly.

/
To all the teachers who say ain't isn't a word,
You should say yet.
U cu*nts.

Well, who used to.

"Ain't" is a word, and it's in the dictionary, too. None of my English teachers ever said otherwise.

I'm 46.
When I was in school the teachers were 60 years old.
At least to my eyes.
I'm sure that one English teacher was 30 or 40.
But yeah, I'm still thinking about when I was in school.
Grade school.
1979.

Fact of the matter is it was racism.

Qua? Ain't is racist?

I'm talking about when I was in school in 1979.

Fat, white, (and sometimes old)  ladies was very insistent that ain't wasn't a word they got God darn ambivalent about it.
I'm convinced it was racism.


That would have been around Kindergarten, right? They also probably told you that your tongue had only four taste receptors, located on different parts of your tongue. Have you not figured out by now that it was all a lie?
 
2020-07-03 4:02:44 AM  

baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: It's become a Smoresabortion.

Good word but I would put an h before bortion.

Smoreshbortion?

Yes. Sounds funnier that way. If you are making up a word, why not make it funny?


😁
 
2020-07-03 4:03:06 AM  

baron von doodle: Don't care about being consistent. Decimate hacks me off because they mean destroy or other synonyms. It originated in laziness and infected the language.


It's meant "destroy, or damage to the point of crippling" for longer than modern English has existed, what the fark are you on about?

The root of the word refers to a somewhat-apocryphal punitive measure of executing one man in ten of a group of rebels by lot, but no one has ever literally meant that.  The thing you're complaining about "changing" is very much the original and only meaning the word's ever had.

This is like getting upset that when someone is called "draconian" they're not literally using a specific set of ancient Mesopotamian laws, or that when you buy fifteen head of cattle you get fifteen entire cattle with legs and torsos included.  You're not even being an actual conservative about the language here, you're being a "conservative" in the sense that US politicians self-identify as 'conservative', where they make up some random bullshiat that never actually happened even once and declare it was totally always tradition.

Decimate never meant elimination of one in ten.  Not once, not ever.  Give it up.

// Chances are that, since the practice was kinda apocryphal, it never even meant literally destroy one in ten in Latin, either.
 
2020-07-03 4:03:39 AM  

Abacus9: baron von doodle: cman: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

Do you care that December is used as the 12th month and not the 10th?

If your gonna get upset about decimate you might as well be consistent.

Don't care about being consistent. Decimate hacks me off because they mean destroy or other synonyms. It originated in laziness and infected the language.

Didn't it come from the Roman practice of, upon losing a battle, the general or whoever was in charge would kill one tenth of his soldiers at random as punishment? Now people think it means to kill all but 10 percent. Weird hill to choose decimation upon.


Huh. I guess the Soviets got it from the Romans. It was only used in capital crimes. Desertion, treason, etc. The Romans were a bit more harsh. A member from the unit had to execute one in ten.
 
2020-07-03 4:05:06 AM  

Ganon D. Mire: baron von doodle: CrazyCurt: What needs to be understood is the English language is "The Borg". It is! It assimilates and changes to the whims and tastes of the era. Kindergarten is a German word but we English speakers know what it is. Mayonnaise? I can't even spell it right w/o spellcheckers and it's as American as Mayonnaise Pie ( seriously I failed twice -- I don't eat it much ). This absurd language gobbles up anything that fits, sounds cool or makes you laugh at the drop of a hat. I think English is the best language there is because it's a bit of every language.

/ We Are The Borg!

Well, yes, American English does the same thing to other languages that we do to food. We steal it, Americanize it and generally ruin the original intention.

[Fark user image image 850x332]
Don't go looking for logic in language.


Or American food.
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-03 4:05:55 AM  

waxbeans: 33 mil? Good God I hope not. By the way, decimate is historically important. The officers in the Soviet Union circa WW1 and 2 would shoot 1 in 10 soldiers at random from any unit that deserted. So, keeping that word accurate is historically important. Nya 😝

Serious about the way Soviet troops were treated. Not so much about the rest.

I'm getting it.
And, if people don't practice social distancing and wearing of masks and all that other jazz,
C-19 may very well randomly kill one in ten Americans.
AKA decimate us like a Russian officer.


A claim regarding the behaviour of "Officers in the Soviet Union" during "WW1" is odd to see from someone also claiming to be very concerned about historical accuracy.
 
2020-07-03 4:06:35 AM  

cman: baron von doodle: Cman, want to do the kangaroo word origin myth?

I dont know a single thing about the etymology of "kangaroo". Never actually thought of looking it up.


Oh wow.

That seems jacked up. The myth.

But the I don't know court is interesting
 
2020-07-03 4:07:16 AM  

CrazyCurt: What needs to be understood is the English language is "The Borg". It is! It assimilates and changes to the whims and tastes of the era. Kindergarten is a German word but we English speakers know what it is. Mayonnaise? I can't even spell it right w/o spellcheckers and it's as American as Mayonnaise Pie ( seriously I failed twice -- I don't eat it much ). This absurd language gobbles up anything that fits, sounds cool or makes you laugh at the drop of a hat. I think English is the best language there is because it's a bit of every language.

/ We Are The Borg!


If I told you I had a funk band (joke from another thread about those two idiots pointing guns at protesters) called "Mustard-covered Boobs and the Gang", I would also tell you one of our biggest hits was called "Summer Mayonnaise".
 
2020-07-03 4:07:30 AM  

pkjun: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

The word's been in use to mean "destroyed a lot of" since the 1660s. Probably best to just let that one go.

/The word "Chair" goes back a bit farther but originally meant "throne" or "pulpit"
//It all changes


It dates to the Roman empire. Try again.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decim​a​tion_(Roman_army)
 
2020-07-03 4:07:39 AM  
Also had a hit with "Relish".
 
2020-07-03 4:07:48 AM  

Abacus9: waxbeans: Snapper Carr: Language evolves as its speakers change.  The word "irregardless" becomes common parlance, linguists are going to take note - eventually it ends up in the dictionary.

This is how language works.

Latin is dead.  It is unchanging.  No one speaks it outside of jargon from a handful of academic fields.

Exactly.

/
To all the teachers who say ain't isn't a word,
You should say yet.
U cu*nts.

Well, who used to.

"Ain't" is a word, and it's in the dictionary, too. None of my English teachers ever said otherwise.


Ain't is a very old word and historically used to be a proper contraction.
 
2020-07-03 4:08:09 AM  

Abacus9: waxbeans: Abacus9: waxbeans: Snapper Carr: Language evolves as its speakers change.  The word "irregardless" becomes common parlance, linguists are going to take note - eventually it ends up in the dictionary.

This is how language works.

Latin is dead.  It is unchanging.  No one speaks it outside of jargon from a handful of academic fields.

Exactly.

/
To all the teachers who say ain't isn't a word,
You should say yet.
U cu*nts.

Well, who used to.

"Ain't" is a word, and it's in the dictionary, too. None of my English teachers ever said otherwise.

I'm 46.
When I was in school the teachers were 60 years old.
At least to my eyes.
I'm sure that one English teacher was 30 or 40.
But yeah, I'm still thinking about when I was in school.
Grade school.
1979.

Fact of the matter is it was racism.

I'm 43. A bit younger, but I went to a fairly conservative Christian school. Ditto on the upper-middle aged teachers. I don't think they only just accepted "ain't" into their lexicon within that three-year span.


Good point.

Maybe it's a Texas thing?
The the two teach teachers I'm thinking of was native Texans
 
2020-07-03 4:09:46 AM  

baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Wait.
We can fix decimate.

C-19 may very well decimate the United States of America.

33 mil? Good God I hope not. By the way, decimate is historically important. The officers in the Soviet Union circa WW1 and 2 would shoot 1 in 10 soldiers at random from any unit that deserted. So, keeping that word accurate is historically important. Nya 😝

Serious about the way Soviet troops were treated. Not so much about the rest.

I'm getting it.
And, if people don't practice social distancing and wearing of masks and all that other jazz,
C-19 may very well randomly kill one in ten Americans.
AKA decimate us like a Russian officer.

More or less. Not Russian though. Soviet. Different ish entities.


My bad. Yeah.

Also, (self reminder)
USSR fell.
 
2020-07-03 4:09:51 AM  

Jim_Callahan: baron von doodle: Don't care about being consistent. Decimate hacks me off because they mean destroy or other synonyms. It originated in laziness and infected the language.

It's meant "destroy, or damage to the point of crippling" for longer than modern English has existed, what the fark are you on about?

The root of the word refers to a somewhat-apocryphal punitive measure of executing one man in ten of a group of rebels by lot, but no one has ever literally meant that.  The thing you're complaining about "changing" is very much the original and only meaning the word's ever had.

This is like getting upset that when someone is called "draconian" they're not literally using a specific set of ancient Mesopotamian laws, or that when you buy fifteen head of cattle you get fifteen entire cattle with legs and torsos included.  You're not even being an actual conservative about the language here, you're being a "conservative" in the sense that US politicians self-identify as 'conservative', where they make up some random bullshiat that never actually happened even once and declare it was totally always tradition.

Decimate never meant elimination of one in ten.  Not once, not ever.  Give it up.

// Chances are that, since the practice was kinda apocryphal, it never even meant literally destroy one in ten in Latin, either.


Yes, to the point of crippling. Any military unit that suffers 10% losses has good odds to break, especially in Roman times.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decim​a​tion_(Roman_army)
 
2020-07-03 4:11:13 AM  

waxbeans: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Wait.
We can fix decimate.

C-19 may very well decimate the United States of America.

33 mil? Good God I hope not. By the way, decimate is historically important. The officers in the Soviet Union circa WW1 and 2 would shoot 1 in 10 soldiers at random from any unit that deserted. So, keeping that word accurate is historically important. Nya 😝

Serious about the way Soviet troops were treated. Not so much about the rest.

I'm getting it.
And, if people don't practice social distancing and wearing of masks and all that other jazz,
C-19 may very well randomly kill one in ten Americans.
AKA decimate us like a Russian officer.

More or less. Not Russian though. Soviet. Different ish entities.

My bad. Yeah.

Also, (self reminder)
USSR fell.


Kinda. Putin is leader for life now apparently. Separate subject. I'll drop it.
 
2020-07-03 4:11:52 AM  

waxbeans: cman: cman: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

Do you care that December is used as the 12th month and not the 10th?

If your gonna get upset about decimate you might as well be consistent.

Addendum

September - "septem" meaning seventh month

October - octo - eight month

November - novem - ninth month

December - decim - tenth month

No one gets upset about how they represent months that dont correspond to their names. So why do some get their panties in a bunch over decimate?

Oh my God I didn't know about this but I'm loving it it further goes to show that, some, teachers are some dumbf$$ks.
but to be fair it's not them it's their syllabuses that they obey and those syllabuses are made by the school board which is a bunch of people who just happen to have money.


The Romans named those months back when the year started in March. In those days, September WAS the seventh month. Etc.
 
2020-07-03 4:13:17 AM  

Abacus9: waxbeans: cman: cman: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

Do you care that December is used as the 12th month and not the 10th?

If your gonna get upset about decimate you might as well be consistent.

Addendum

September - "septem" meaning seventh month

October - octo - eight month

November - novem - ninth month

December - decim - tenth month

No one gets upset about how they represent months that dont correspond to their names. So why do some get their panties in a bunch over decimate?

Oh my God I didn't know about this but I'm loving it it further goes to show that, some, teachers are some dumbf$$ks.
but to be fair it's not them it's their syllabuses that they obey and those syllabuses are made by the school board which is a bunch of people who just happen to have money.

The Romans named those months back when the year started in March. In those days, September WAS the seventh month. Etc.


Nice. Thanks for knowledge.
 
2020-07-03 4:14:31 AM  

Natalie Portmanteau: aerojockey: I can't think of a single time I've ever heard someone say "irregardless" non-ironically.

I occasionally say disirregardless to fark with people


I'm going to start saying that, disirregardless of how it makes ppl feels.
 
2020-07-03 4:16:33 AM  

baron von doodle: pkjun: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

The word's been in use to mean "destroyed a lot of" since the 1660s. Probably best to just let that one go.

/The word "Chair" goes back a bit farther but originally meant "throne" or "pulpit"
//It all changes

It dates to the Roman empire. Try again.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decima​tion_(Roman_army)


Okay, let's try again with you being less of a dumbass.

The term has been in common use in the English language to mean "destroyed a large but indefinite amount of" since the 1660s at least. We are talking about the English language, and how its use of a commonly understood word differs from the apocryphal pseudohistorical Roman references to purported group punishments from which that word derives. Even if decimation only meant "killing 1/10 by lot" in Latin -- which it absolutely did not; they used it as a figurative reference to an imagined more-barbaric history also, and there is very little evidence that anyone was ever actually decimated -- we are discussing how it is used in English, and it has been used in English with its current popular meaning for four and a half centuries. Get over it.
 
2020-07-03 4:16:55 AM  

Abacus9: waxbeans: baron von doodle: waxbeans: Abacus9: waxbeans: Snapper Carr: Language evolves as its speakers change.  The word "irregardless" becomes common parlance, linguists are going to take note - eventually it ends up in the dictionary.

This is how language works.

Latin is dead.  It is unchanging.  No one speaks it outside of jargon from a handful of academic fields.

Exactly.

/
To all the teachers who say ain't isn't a word,
You should say yet.
U cu*nts.

Well, who used to.

"Ain't" is a word, and it's in the dictionary, too. None of my English teachers ever said otherwise.

I'm 46.
When I was in school the teachers were 60 years old.
At least to my eyes.
I'm sure that one English teacher was 30 or 40.
But yeah, I'm still thinking about when I was in school.
Grade school.
1979.

Fact of the matter is it was racism.

Qua? Ain't is racist?

I'm talking about when I was in school in 1979.

Fat, white, (and sometimes old)  ladies was very insistent that ain't wasn't a word they got God darn ambivalent about it.
I'm convinced it was racism.

That would have been around Kindergarten, right? They also probably told you that your tongue had only four taste receptors, located on different parts of your tongue. Have you not figured out by now that it was all a lie?


I've been getting that feeling for at least 20 years.

About this and many other things.
the interesting thing is people are still holding on to those lies and being insistent about them.
 
2020-07-03 4:17:30 AM  

baron von doodle: CrazyCurt: What needs to be understood is the English language is "The Borg". It is! It assimilates and changes to the whims and tastes of the era. Kindergarten is a German word but we English speakers know what it is. Mayonnaise? I can't even spell it right w/o spellcheckers and it's as American as Mayonnaise Pie ( seriously I failed twice -- I don't eat it much ). This absurd language gobbles up anything that fits, sounds cool or makes you laugh at the drop of a hat. I think English is the best language there is because it's a bit of every language.

/ We Are The Borg!

Well, yes, American English does the same thing to other languages that we do to food. We steal it, Americanize it and generally ruin the original intention.


So you're saying we eat it, turn it to shiat, and shiat it for others? Yes. And that's fine. Languages change. English is probably the worst offender, but it's such a rich language for it (because it's a thief). But it's a good thief because it doesn't take away from the other languages.
 
2020-07-03 4:18:17 AM  

cman: Addendum

September - "septem" meaning seventh month

October - octo - eight month

November - novem - ninth month

December - decim - tenth month

No one gets upset about how they represent months that dont correspond to their names. So why do some get their panties in a bunch over decimate?


The names did correspond to their months before the Romans added January and February to the start of the year in order to fix their then shambolic calendar.
 
2020-07-03 4:19:14 AM  

Jim_Callahan: baron von doodle: Don't care about being consistent. Decimate hacks me off because they mean destroy or other synonyms. It originated in laziness and infected the language.

It's meant "destroy, or damage to the point of crippling" for longer than modern English has existed, what the fark are you on about?

The root of the word refers to a somewhat-apocryphal punitive measure of executing one man in ten of a group of rebels by lot, but no one has ever literally meant that.  The thing you're complaining about "changing" is very much the original and only meaning the word's ever had.

This is like getting upset that when someone is called "draconian" they're not literally using a specific set of ancient Mesopotamian laws, or that when you buy fifteen head of cattle you get fifteen entire cattle with legs and torsos included.  You're not even being an actual conservative about the language here, you're being a "conservative" in the sense that US politicians self-identify as 'conservative', where they make up some random bullshiat that never actually happened even once and declare it was totally always tradition.

Decimate never meant elimination of one in ten.  Not once, not ever.  Give it up.

// Chances are that, since the practice was kinda apocryphal, it never even meant literally destroy one in ten in Latin, either.


the fun thing is if we use it in the manner of one in ten and it catches on then that will be its meeting because  usage is King
 
2020-07-03 4:20:00 AM  

baron von doodle: Ganon D. Mire: baron von doodle: CrazyCurt: What needs to be understood is the English language is "The Borg". It is! It assimilates and changes to the whims and tastes of the era. Kindergarten is a German word but we English speakers know what it is. Mayonnaise? I can't even spell it right w/o spellcheckers and it's as American as Mayonnaise Pie ( seriously I failed twice -- I don't eat it much ). This absurd language gobbles up anything that fits, sounds cool or makes you laugh at the drop of a hat. I think English is the best language there is because it's a bit of every language.

/ We Are The Borg!

Well, yes, American English does the same thing to other languages that we do to food. We steal it, Americanize it and generally ruin the original intention.

[Fark user image image 850x332]
Don't go looking for logic in language.

Or American food.
[Fark user image image 425x425]


It's so disturbing to learn that this is mostly oil
 
2020-07-03 4:20:50 AM  

pkjun: waxbeans: 33 mil? Good God I hope not. By the way, decimate is historically important. The officers in the Soviet Union circa WW1 and 2 would shoot 1 in 10 soldiers at random from any unit that deserted. So, keeping that word accurate is historically important. Nya 😝

Serious about the way Soviet troops were treated. Not so much about the rest.

I'm getting it.
And, if people don't practice social distancing and wearing of masks and all that other jazz,
C-19 may very well randomly kill one in ten Americans.
AKA decimate us like a Russian officer.

A claim regarding the behaviour of "Officers in the Soviet Union" during "WW1" is odd to see from someone also claiming to be very concerned about historical accuracy.


Oh now you just nitpicking
 
2020-07-03 4:20:56 AM  

waxbeans: Abacus9: Commander Lysdexic: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

The American English dictionary DEFINATELY does not make the rules.
I'll wait until the Oxford English dictionary weighs in.

Definitely.

Didn't Oxford enter in abbreviations from text speak


How the fark would I know, I was just correcting someone else's misspelling (again, to screw over hypocrites, not because I care about this shiat.)
 
2020-07-03 4:21:52 AM  

Abacus9: If I told you I had a funk band (joke from another thread about those two idiots pointing guns at protesters) called "Mustard-covered Boobs and the Gang", I would also tell you one of our biggest hits was called "Summer Mayonnaise".


😆😆😆😆
 
2020-07-03 4:22:47 AM  

Abacus9: Also had a hit with "Relish".


Oh my gosh so that means I can say I relish the hell out of relish
 
2020-07-03 4:23:05 AM  

pkjun: baron von doodle: pkjun: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

The word's been in use to mean "destroyed a lot of" since the 1660s. Probably best to just let that one go.

/The word "Chair" goes back a bit farther but originally meant "throne" or "pulpit"
//It all changes

It dates to the Roman empire. Try again.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decima​tion_(Roman_army)

Okay, let's try again with you being less of a dumbass.

The term has been in common use in the English language to mean "destroyed a large but indefinite amount of" since the 1660s at least. We are talking about the English language, and how its use of a commonly understood word differs from the apocryphal pseudohistorical Roman references to purported group punishments from which that word derives. Even if decimation only meant "killing 1/10 by lot" in Latin -- which it absolutely did not; they used it as a figurative reference to an imagined more-barbaric history also, and there is very little evidence that anyone was ever actually decimated -- we are discussing how it is used in English, and it has been used in English with its current popular meaning for four and a half centuries. Get over it.


You started the insults, not me you useless semi-sentient bag of mostly water. Yes, the usage shifted in the 1600s but it shifted back in the USSR. Do try to keep up. It seems that you are....ahem, slow.
 
2020-07-03 4:23:27 AM  

RedVentrue: Abacus9: waxbeans: Snapper Carr: Language evolves as its speakers change.  The word "irregardless" becomes common parlance, linguists are going to take note - eventually it ends up in the dictionary.

This is how language works.

Latin is dead.  It is unchanging.  No one speaks it outside of jargon from a handful of academic fields.

Exactly.

/
To all the teachers who say ain't isn't a word,
You should say yet.
U cu*nts.

Well, who used to.

"Ain't" is a word, and it's in the dictionary, too. None of my English teachers ever said otherwise.

Ain't is a very old word and historically used to be a proper contraction.


I guess this settles it those teachers were being disingenuous
 
2020-07-03 4:23:42 AM  

Gordon Bennett: cman: Addendum

September - "septem" meaning seventh month

October - octo - eight month

November - novem - ninth month

December - decim - tenth month

No one gets upset about how they represent months that dont correspond to their names. So why do some get their panties in a bunch over decimate?

The names did correspond to their months before the Romans added January and February to the start of the year in order to fix their then shambolic calendar.


Yes and decimate once meant to reduce by a tenth

Over time things changed which is why those months no longer correspond to their namesake and that decimate now is synonymous with "to destroy".
 
2020-07-03 4:25:27 AM  

Abacus9: How the fark would I know, I was just correcting someone else's misspelling (again, to screw over hypocrites, not because I care about this shiat.)


Technically, that last period should be placed outside your closing parentheses.
 
2020-07-03 4:25:58 AM  

baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Wait.
We can fix decimate.

C-19 may very well decimate the United States of America.

33 mil? Good God I hope not. By the way, decimate is historically important. The officers in the Soviet Union circa WW1 and 2 would shoot 1 in 10 soldiers at random from any unit that deserted. So, keeping that word accurate is historically important. Nya 😝

Serious about the way Soviet troops were treated. Not so much about the rest.

I'm getting it.
And, if people don't practice social distancing and wearing of masks and all that other jazz,
C-19 may very well randomly kill one in ten Americans.
AKA decimate us like a Russian officer.

More or less. Not Russian though. Soviet. Different ish entities.

My bad. Yeah.

Also, (self reminder)
USSR fell.

Kinda. Putin is leader for life now apparently. Separate subject. I'll drop it.


Oh wow


So we should use

Pre/ post perestroika
And
Pre/ post Nazi invasion
 
2020-07-03 4:26:08 AM  

waxbeans: Abacus9: waxbeans: Snapper Carr: Language evolves as its speakers change.  The word "irregardless" becomes common parlance, linguists are going to take note - eventually it ends up in the dictionary.

This is how language works.

Latin is dead.  It is unchanging.  No one speaks it outside of jargon from a handful of academic fields.

Exactly.

/
To all the teachers who say ain't isn't a word,
You should say yet.
U cu*nts.

Well, who used to.

"Ain't" is a word, and it's in the dictionary, too. None of my English teachers ever said otherwise.

I'm 46.
When I was in school the teachers were 60 years old.
At least to my eyes.
I'm sure that one English teacher was 30 or 40.
But yeah, I'm still thinking about when I was in school.
Grade school.
1979.

Fact of the matter is it was racism.


you were having serious arguments with your school teacher, concerning his/her insistence that "ain't" would never be proper english being truly based in denigrating black culture and reinforcing american systemic racism, when you were only FIVE? huh, i guess that would explain some things...

i personally waited to have those kind of public classroom arguments all the way to third grade. with mrs. sears, a cruel woman who power-tripped by working with 8 year olds every day.
 
2020-07-03 4:26:53 AM  

Abacus9: baron von doodle: CrazyCurt: What needs to be understood is the English language is "The Borg". It is! It assimilates and changes to the whims and tastes of the era. Kindergarten is a German word but we English speakers know what it is. Mayonnaise? I can't even spell it right w/o spellcheckers and it's as American as Mayonnaise Pie ( seriously I failed twice -- I don't eat it much ). This absurd language gobbles up anything that fits, sounds cool or makes you laugh at the drop of a hat. I think English is the best language there is because it's a bit of every language.

/ We Are The Borg!

Well, yes, American English does the same thing to other languages that we do to food. We steal it, Americanize it and generally ruin the original intention.

So you're saying we eat it, turn it to shiat, and shiat it for others? Yes. And that's fine. Languages change. English is probably the worst offender, but it's such a rich language for it (because it's a thief). But it's a good thief because it doesn't take away from the other languages.


I didn't mean turn it to shiat. Umm. Homoginazition is a better term. The world has tons of great cheeses. We have American cheese slices and Velveeta.
 
2020-07-03 4:27:01 AM  

aerojockey: I can't think of a single time I've ever heard someone say "irregardless" non-ironically.


LOL I was conducting a very high level meeting with two major corporations the guy who was an Exec VP from HP - who reported to Carly Forina  - used the word 6 times.  We all held our breath, emotions and disdain very professionally.  When we broke from the meeting we all just laughed our asses off...... The guy was a tool.  End of the day........Look what happened to HP.  My Company - Cisco, was good to go (At the time)......
 
2020-07-03 4:27:34 AM  

Abacus9: waxbeans: cman: cman: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

Do you care that December is used as the 12th month and not the 10th?

If your gonna get upset about decimate you might as well be consistent.

Addendum

September - "septem" meaning seventh month

October - octo - eight month

November - novem - ninth month

December - decim - tenth month

No one gets upset about how they represent months that dont correspond to their names. So why do some get their panties in a bunch over decimate?

Oh my God I didn't know about this but I'm loving it it further goes to show that, some, teachers are some dumbf$$ks.
but to be fair it's not them it's their syllabuses that they obey and those syllabuses are made by the school board which is a bunch of people who just happen to have money.

The Romans named those months back when the year started in March. In those days, September WAS the seventh month. Etc.


Oh my God I love numbers
And the superstitions around them

So my birthday is all 7s.
😁😁😁😁
 
2020-07-03 4:28:00 AM  

waxbeans: baron von doodle: Ganon D. Mire: baron von doodle: CrazyCurt: What needs to be understood is the English language is "The Borg". It is! It assimilates and changes to the whims and tastes of the era. Kindergarten is a German word but we English speakers know what it is. Mayonnaise? I can't even spell it right w/o spellcheckers and it's as American as Mayonnaise Pie ( seriously I failed twice -- I don't eat it much ). This absurd language gobbles up anything that fits, sounds cool or makes you laugh at the drop of a hat. I think English is the best language there is because it's a bit of every language.

/ We Are The Borg!

Well, yes, American English does the same thing to other languages that we do to food. We steal it, Americanize it and generally ruin the original intention.

[Fark user image image 850x332]
Don't go looking for logic in language.

Or American food.
[Fark user image image 425x425]

It's so disturbing to learn that this is mostly oil


And very old. 1918.
 
2020-07-03 4:29:03 AM  

Abacus9: baron von doodle: cman: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

Do you care that December is used as the 12th month and not the 10th?

If your gonna get upset about decimate you might as well be consistent.

Don't care about being consistent. Decimate hacks me off because they mean destroy or other synonyms. It originated in laziness and infected the language.

Didn't it come from the Roman practice of, upon losing a battle, the general or whoever was in charge would kill one tenth of his soldiers at random as punishment? Now people think it means to kill all but 10 percent. Weird hill to choose decimation upon.


Wikipedia says I'm right: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decimat​i​on_(Roman_army)
 
2020-07-03 4:30:25 AM  

pkjun: discussing how it is used in English, and it has been used in English with its current popular meaning for four and a half centuries. Get over it.


Nope.

I'm pretty certain c-19 will determine the United States if Americans don't wear mask and social distance.
 
2020-07-03 4:30:29 AM  

studebaker hoch: The verbing of nouns.


Verbing weirds language.
 
2020-07-03 4:30:51 AM  
Also......the first time I said that word at age 12 ....My father, a professor at Stanford University, slapped me upside the head and explained how it wasn't a word.  Yes, he physically slapped me upside the head - with force........ best English lesson I ever had.
 
2020-07-03 4:31:36 AM  

Gordon Bennett: cman: Addendum

September - "septem" meaning seventh month

October - octo - eight month

November - novem - ninth month

December - decim - tenth month

No one gets upset about how they represent months that dont correspond to their names. So why do some get their panties in a bunch over decimate?

The names did correspond to their months before the Romans added January and February to the start of the year in order to fix their then shambolic calendar.


Wait a minute that means they should have renamed all the months then that would have made more sense
 
2020-07-03 4:33:37 AM  

Abacus9: Abacus9: baron von doodle: cman: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

Do you care that December is used as the 12th month and not the 10th?

If your gonna get upset about decimate you might as well be consistent.

Don't care about being consistent. Decimate hacks me off because they mean destroy or other synonyms. It originated in laziness and infected the language.

Didn't it come from the Roman practice of, upon losing a battle, the general or whoever was in charge would kill one tenth of his soldiers at random as punishment? Now people think it means to kill all but 10 percent. Weird hill to choose decimation upon.

Wikipedia says I'm right: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decimati​on_(Roman_army)


Fine, you win. I don't care. You score an intellectual point.

I wasn't here to fight, just..... Fork it, nm. Anything I say will lead to a counter and me countering, etc.

I'm done. Everyone can believe whatever definition they want. I'm out.
 
2020-07-03 4:33:56 AM  

in flagrante: Abacus9: How the fark would I know, I was just correcting someone else's misspelling (again, to screw over hypocrites, not because I care about this shiat.)

Technically, that last period should be placed outside your closing parentheses.


I've never understood that rule to me everything that belongs inside the (belongs inside the) because it's inside the prison seas


For some reason text to voice added those ()()()
 
2020-07-03 4:35:54 AM  

Natalie Portmanteau: aerojockey: I can't think of a single time I've ever heard someone say "irregardless" non-ironically.

I occasionally say disirregardless to fark with people


I use "irregardlessly" for the same reasons.

I think I will expand that to "disirregardlessly" now. Thanks.

Embrace your disirregardlesslynesshood!
 
2020-07-03 4:37:22 AM  

waxbeans: Abacus9: I understand that, and I never said the usage was "wrong". Only that is was "stupid", which is correct.

I get the distinct feeling you harp on people based on their regional Annunciation of words don't you?


Not at all, on the contrary even. I've said over and over on this site (just the other day in fact) that the purpose of language is to convey meaning; to understand and to be understood. Whatever language you use to this purpose is just fine if it works. However, I will correct grammar nazis if they make a mistake, in order to show their hypocrisy, and I will occasionally point out the stupidity of a word like "inflammable" which could cause confusion because it's not what it sounds like. Otherwise, I don't correct bad grammar, because everyone makes mistakes. "Irregardless" is a stupid word because it's "regardless" works just fine. Maybe not wrong, but still stupid (inefficient). And while I don't go around saying "y'all", I don't correct people for it. There's nothing to correct.
 
2020-07-03 4:38:09 AM  

waxbeans: in flagrante: Abacus9: How the fark would I know, I was just correcting someone else's misspelling (again, to screw over hypocrites, not because I care about this shiat.)

Technically, that last period should be placed outside your closing parentheses.

I've never understood that rule to me everything that belongs inside the (belongs inside the) because it's inside the prison seas


For some reason text to voice added those ()()()


Damn you. I was going to bed. What is the proper punctuation after an emoji or emoticon?
Hi 😁
Hi :D
 
2020-07-03 4:39:12 AM  
I still prefer emoticons. I'm oldish.
 
2020-07-03 4:41:08 AM  

luna1580: waxbeans: Abacus9: waxbeans: Snapper Carr: Language evolves as its speakers change.  The word "irregardless" becomes common parlance, linguists are going to take note - eventually it ends up in the dictionary.

This is how language works.

Latin is dead.  It is unchanging.  No one speaks it outside of jargon from a handful of academic fields.

Exactly.

/
To all the teachers who say ain't isn't a word,
You should say yet.
U cu*nts.

Well, who used to.

"Ain't" is a word, and it's in the dictionary, too. None of my English teachers ever said otherwise.

I'm 46.
When I was in school the teachers were 60 years old.
At least to my eyes.
I'm sure that one English teacher was 30 or 40.
But yeah, I'm still thinking about when I was in school.
Grade school.
1979.

Fact of the matter is it was racism.

you were having serious arguments with your school teacher, concerning his/her insistence that "ain't" would never be proper english being truly based in denigrating black culture and reinforcing american systemic racism, when you were only FIVE? huh, i guess that would explain some things...

i personally waited to have those kind of public classroom arguments all the way to third grade. with mrs. sears, a cruel woman who power-tripped by working with 8 year olds every day.


I wasn't my fault.

Teachers have some kind of authority issue.
Me? I have a issue with flawed information and or lies.
 
Displayed 50 of 342 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.