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8327 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Jul 2020 at 2:05 AM (22 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-07-03 3:32:04 AM  
Make sense?
 
2020-07-03 3:32:11 AM  

Abacus9: waxbeans: Snapper Carr: Language evolves as its speakers change.  The word "irregardless" becomes common parlance, linguists are going to take note - eventually it ends up in the dictionary.

This is how language works.

Latin is dead.  It is unchanging.  No one speaks it outside of jargon from a handful of academic fields.

Exactly.

/
To all the teachers who say ain't isn't a word,
You should say yet.
U cu*nts.

Well, who used to.

"Ain't" is a word, and it's in the dictionary, too. None of my English teachers ever said otherwise.


I'm 46.
When I was in school the teachers were 60 years old.
At least to my eyes.
I'm sure that one English teacher was 30 or 40.
But yeah, I'm still thinking about when I was in school.
Grade school.
1979.

Fact of the matter is it was racism.
 
2020-07-03 3:32:11 AM  

Yamaneko2: Most human languages were developed by illiterates.  English was a group project by three sets of illiterates (Celts, Angles/Saxons/Jutes, Vikings/Danes/Norwegians) and semiliterate Normans.  Then the educated people had a go at it -- Samuel Johnson declaring that the gates of English are open and to keep it pure would be folly, "to lash the wind".

Then the Anglophones on one side of the pond decided to conquer most of their hemisphere and the Anglophones on the other decided to invite or force people of every nation to come over to our side of the pond and talked with them.

So English is an unwieldy, unstable, illogical mess.  That's why it has become a lingua franca.


Excellent.
 
2020-07-03 3:32:46 AM  

baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.


Do you care that December is used as the 12th month and not the 10th?

If your gonna get upset about decimate you might as well be consistent.
 
2020-07-03 3:33:14 AM  

waxbeans: Abacus9: waxbeans: Snapper Carr: Language evolves as its speakers change.  The word "irregardless" becomes common parlance, linguists are going to take note - eventually it ends up in the dictionary.

This is how language works.

Latin is dead.  It is unchanging.  No one speaks it outside of jargon from a handful of academic fields.

Exactly.

/
To all the teachers who say ain't isn't a word,
You should say yet.
U cu*nts.

Well, who used to.

"Ain't" is a word, and it's in the dictionary, too. None of my English teachers ever said otherwise.

I'm 46.
When I was in school the teachers were 60 years old.
At least to my eyes.
I'm sure that one English teacher was 30 or 40.
But yeah, I'm still thinking about when I was in school.
Grade school.
1979.

Fact of the matter is it was racism.


Qua? Ain't is racist?
 
2020-07-03 3:34:38 AM  

baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.


🤗😁

But, for real,
You'd like
Bad English: A History of Linguistic Aggravation

It's very enlightening.
 
2020-07-03 3:35:37 AM  
i.imgflip.comView Full Size
 
2020-07-03 3:35:51 AM  

Abacus9: Yamaneko2: Most human languages were developed by illiterates.  English was a group project by three sets of illiterates (Celts, Angles/Saxons/Jutes, Vikings/Danes/Norwegians) and semiliterate Normans.  Then the educated people had a go at it -- Samuel Johnson declaring that the gates of English are open and to keep it pure would be folly, "to lash the wind".

Then the Anglophones on one side of the pond decided to conquer most of their hemisphere and the Anglophones on the other decided to invite or force people of every nation to come over to our side of the pond and talked with them.

So English is an unwieldy, unstable, illogical mess.  That's why it has become a lingua franca.

Excellent.


Nnnnnnn

It's become a Smoresabortion.
 
2020-07-03 3:36:23 AM  

cman: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

Do you care that December is used as the 12th month and not the 10th?

If your gonna get upset about decimate you might as well be consistent.


Don't care about being consistent. Decimate hacks me off because they mean destroy or other synonyms. It originated in laziness and infected the language.
 
2020-07-03 3:37:14 AM  

Garza and the Supermutants: [Fark user image 612x408]


Ah, Carrie. Sorta cute on the left, hot blood-covered mess on the right.
 
2020-07-03 3:37:38 AM  

cman: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

Do you care that December is used as the 12th month and not the 10th?

If your gonna get upset about decimate you might as well be consistent.


Addendum

September - "septem" meaning seventh month

October - octo - eight month

November - novem - ninth month

December - decim - tenth month

No one gets upset about how they represent months that dont correspond to their names. So why do some get their panties in a bunch over decimate?
 
2020-07-03 3:37:48 AM  
Hot mess covered in blood, you know. Christ.
 
2020-07-03 3:38:00 AM  

baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.


Wait.
We can fix decimate.

C-19 may very well decimate the United States of America.
 
2020-07-03 3:38:03 AM  

waxbeans: Abacus9: Yamaneko2: Most human languages were developed by illiterates.  English was a group project by three sets of illiterates (Celts, Angles/Saxons/Jutes, Vikings/Danes/Norwegians) and semiliterate Normans.  Then the educated people had a go at it -- Samuel Johnson declaring that the gates of English are open and to keep it pure would be folly, "to lash the wind".

Then the Anglophones on one side of the pond decided to conquer most of their hemisphere and the Anglophones on the other decided to invite or force people of every nation to come over to our side of the pond and talked with them.

So English is an unwieldy, unstable, illogical mess.  That's why it has become a lingua franca.

Excellent.

Nnnnnnn

It's become a Smoresabortion.


Good word but I would put an h before bortion.
 
2020-07-03 3:39:24 AM  

baron von doodle: cman: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

Do you care that December is used as the 12th month and not the 10th?

If your gonna get upset about decimate you might as well be consistent.

Don't care about being consistent. Decimate hacks me off because they mean destroy or other synonyms. It originated in laziness and infected the language.


The word "deer" once meant any kind of animal before its meaning narrowed to what it is today. The word "silly" once meant "innocent" before it went thru an ungodly transformation. The word "smart" originally meant "pain".

Language changes. It happens. Embrace it. Dont hate it.
 
2020-07-03 3:40:37 AM  

Commander Lysdexic: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

The American English dictionary DEFINATELY does not make the rules.
I'll wait until the Oxford English dictionary weighs in.


Definitely.
 
2020-07-03 3:40:46 AM  

baron von doodle: waxbeans: Abacus9: waxbeans: Snapper Carr: Language evolves as its speakers change.  The word "irregardless" becomes common parlance, linguists are going to take note - eventually it ends up in the dictionary.

This is how language works.

Latin is dead.  It is unchanging.  No one speaks it outside of jargon from a handful of academic fields.

Exactly.

/
To all the teachers who say ain't isn't a word,
You should say yet.
U cu*nts.

Well, who used to.

"Ain't" is a word, and it's in the dictionary, too. None of my English teachers ever said otherwise.

I'm 46.
When I was in school the teachers were 60 years old.
At least to my eyes.
I'm sure that one English teacher was 30 or 40.
But yeah, I'm still thinking about when I was in school.
Grade school.
1979.

Fact of the matter is it was racism.

Qua? Ain't is racist?


I'm talking about when I was in school in 1979.

Fat, white, (and sometimes old)  ladies was very insistent that ain't wasn't a word they got God darn ambivalent about it.
I'm convinced it was racism.
 
2020-07-03 3:41:34 AM  
irregardless: Lacking of an eerie guard.
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-03 3:42:21 AM  
What needs to be understood is the English language is "The Borg". It is! It assimilates and changes to the whims and tastes of the era. Kindergarten is a German word but we English speakers know what it is. Mayonnaise? I can't even spell it right w/o spellcheckers and it's as American as Mayonnaise Pie ( seriously I failed twice -- I don't eat it much ). This absurd language gobbles up anything that fits, sounds cool or makes you laugh at the drop of a hat. I think English is the best language there is because it's a bit of every language.

/ We Are The Borg!
 
2020-07-03 3:42:33 AM  
Irregardless is a stupid, unnecessary word, but it's in widespread enough use and doesn't directly contradict any rules of how words are constructed enough to be a "real" word.

Actually I always kind of assumed it was the original word since it has an archaic prefix, like with inflammable and flammable (inflammable was the original word but it sort of incidentally works out that flammable conveys the same meaning by accident).  Looking it up it seems like it comes from blending irrespective and regardless in the mid-20th century, so probably it's listed as an irregular usage/slang term at this point?  e.g. "ain't" and "y'all".
 
2020-07-03 3:42:33 AM  

Abacus9: I could be wrong, but shouldn't that be "if I'd never heard", because it's subjunctive?


Using the modal auxiliary verb "could" to modify "live" at the beginning of the sentence should be enough for a reader to follow me on my imagined scenario, without strict grammatical agreement in the conditional clause.  Debatable I guess.

If we're being Nazis, I'd probably have to concede.
 
2020-07-03 3:42:58 AM  

cman: cman: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

Do you care that December is used as the 12th month and not the 10th?

If your gonna get upset about decimate you might as well be consistent.

Addendum

September - "septem" meaning seventh month

October - octo - eight month

November - novem - ninth month

December - decim - tenth month

No one gets upset about how they represent months that dont correspond to their names. So why do some get their panties in a bunch over decimate?


Oh my God I didn't know about this but I'm loving it it further goes to show that, some, teachers are some dumbf$$ks.
but to be fair it's not them it's their syllabuses that they obey and those syllabuses are made by the school board which is a bunch of people who just happen to have money.
 
2020-07-03 3:43:57 AM  

baron von doodle: waxbeans: Abacus9: Yamaneko2: Most human languages were developed by illiterates.  English was a group project by three sets of illiterates (Celts, Angles/Saxons/Jutes, Vikings/Danes/Norwegians) and semiliterate Normans.  Then the educated people had a go at it -- Samuel Johnson declaring that the gates of English are open and to keep it pure would be folly, "to lash the wind".

Then the Anglophones on one side of the pond decided to conquer most of their hemisphere and the Anglophones on the other decided to invite or force people of every nation to come over to our side of the pond and talked with them.

So English is an unwieldy, unstable, illogical mess.  That's why it has become a lingua franca.

Excellent.

Nnnnnnn

It's become a Smoresabortion.

Good word but I would put an h before bortion.


Cool.
Let It be written let it be done
 
2020-07-03 3:44:02 AM  

waxbeans: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

Wait.
We can fix decimate.

C-19 may very well decimate the United States of America.


33 mil? Good God I hope not. By the way, decimate is historically important. The officers in the Soviet Union circa WW1 and 2 would shoot 1 in 10 soldiers at random from any unit that deserted. So, keeping that word accurate is historically important. Nya 😝

Serious about the way Soviet troops were treated. Not so much about the rest.
 
2020-07-03 3:45:24 AM  

baron von doodle: It's become a Smoresabortion.

Good word but I would put an h before bortion.

Smoreshbortion?

 
2020-07-03 3:45:27 AM  

waxbeans: baron von doodle: waxbeans: Abacus9: waxbeans: Snapper Carr: Language evolves as its speakers change.  The word "irregardless" becomes common parlance, linguists are going to take note - eventually it ends up in the dictionary.

This is how language works.

Latin is dead.  It is unchanging.  No one speaks it outside of jargon from a handful of academic fields.

Exactly.

/
To all the teachers who say ain't isn't a word,
You should say yet.
U cu*nts.

Well, who used to.

"Ain't" is a word, and it's in the dictionary, too. None of my English teachers ever said otherwise.

I'm 46.
When I was in school the teachers were 60 years old.
At least to my eyes.
I'm sure that one English teacher was 30 or 40.
But yeah, I'm still thinking about when I was in school.
Grade school.
1979.

Fact of the matter is it was racism.

Qua? Ain't is racist?

I'm talking about when I was in school in 1979.

Fat, white, (and sometimes old)  ladies was very insistent that ain't wasn't a word they got God darn ambivalent about it.
I'm convinced it was racism.


Ah, sorry. I'm 39 btw.
 
2020-07-03 3:45:52 AM  

waxbeans: Abacus9: dkulprit: Can someone please show me the words tree where the words grow naturally and we harvest them to add to the dictionary so they are now officially words?

Words meanings get changed over time.

Words get created all the time irregardless of what you think.

Did you know you Shakespeare personally brought 500 words into the lexicon?  We add words here and there randomly after they have become used so often that they become words, but 1 guy, in his lifetime, brought 500 words into the lexicon.

Critics of this would hate him.  He brought "swagger", "lonely", "hint", and "critic" into the language just by using them in his plays.

I don't think the problem is so much with new words, the problem is stupidly used words. "Irregardless" is unnecessary because it means the same as "regardless", which not only preceded it, but is shorter thus more efficient. Whereas adding the prefix just shows ignorance of language and its roots.

You're completely missing the point.
Usage is the authority here not how you feel.


I understand that, and I never said the usage was "wrong". Only that is was "stupid", which is correct.
 
2020-07-03 3:46:57 AM  

baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

Wait.
We can fix decimate.

C-19 may very well decimate the United States of America.

33 mil? Good God I hope not. By the way, decimate is historically important. The officers in the Soviet Union circa WW1 and 2 would shoot 1 in 10 soldiers at random from any unit that deserted. So, keeping that word accurate is historically important. Nya 😝


I find it funny how everytime someone brings up the "history" of decimate as an example of "true meaning", it's from a different era, war, or country.
 
2020-07-03 3:47:54 AM  

CrazyCurt: What needs to be understood is the English language is "The Borg". It is! It assimilates and changes to the whims and tastes of the era. Kindergarten is a German word but we English speakers know what it is. Mayonnaise? I can't even spell it right w/o spellcheckers and it's as American as Mayonnaise Pie ( seriously I failed twice -- I don't eat it much ). This absurd language gobbles up anything that fits, sounds cool or makes you laugh at the drop of a hat. I think English is the best language there is because it's a bit of every language.

/ We Are The Borg!


Well, yes, American English does the same thing to other languages that we do to food. We steal it, Americanize it and generally ruin the original intention.
 
2020-07-03 3:48:22 AM  

baron von doodle: Abacus9: in flagrante: Spartapuss: Hoisted on it's own petard.

its!

I've personally never heard anyone use the word 'irregardless' when speaking.  In print, the only time I've come across it is in written diatribes bemoaning the collapse of civilization as we know it....usually written by people who are trying very hard to justify those liberal arts degrees.   I honestly think we're ok here.

Clichéd idioms bother me a lot more than mutated single words.  I could live the rest of my life pretty comfortably if I never heard "at the end of the day" again.  You probably all have your own favourites as well.

I could be wrong, but shouldn't that be "if I'd never heard", because it's subjunctive?

Yes, because online grammar is always correct. Chat Nazi.


I was correcting a grammar Nazi who used incorrect grammar. I don't personally care, just pointing out the hypocrisy.
 
2020-07-03 3:48:53 AM  

cman: The word "deer" once meant any kind of animal before its meaning narrowed to what it is today. The word "silly" once meant "innocent" before it went thru an ungodly transformation. The word "smart" originally meant "pain


ROFLMAO.
I utterly love learning theses.

This is a silly jab, but, smart people are a pain.
 
2020-07-03 3:49:34 AM  

Abacus9: Commander Lysdexic: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

The American English dictionary DEFINATELY does not make the rules.
I'll wait until the Oxford English dictionary weighs in.

Definitely.


Didn't Oxford enter in abbreviations from text speak
 
2020-07-03 3:49:50 AM  

waxbeans: baron von doodle: It's become a Smoresabortion.

Good word but I would put an h before bortion.

Smoreshbortion?


Yes. Sounds funnier that way. If you are making up a word, why not make it funny?
 
2020-07-03 3:51:31 AM  
Cman, want to do the kangaroo word origin myth?
 
2020-07-03 3:52:48 AM  

baron von doodle: Cman, want to do the kangaroo word origin myth?


I dont know a single thing about the etymology of "kangaroo". Never actually thought of looking it up.
 
2020-07-03 3:53:04 AM  

waxbeans: Abacus9: waxbeans: Snapper Carr: Language evolves as its speakers change.  The word "irregardless" becomes common parlance, linguists are going to take note - eventually it ends up in the dictionary.

This is how language works.

Latin is dead.  It is unchanging.  No one speaks it outside of jargon from a handful of academic fields.

Exactly.

/
To all the teachers who say ain't isn't a word,
You should say yet.
U cu*nts.

Well, who used to.

"Ain't" is a word, and it's in the dictionary, too. None of my English teachers ever said otherwise.

I'm 46.
When I was in school the teachers were 60 years old.
At least to my eyes.
I'm sure that one English teacher was 30 or 40.
But yeah, I'm still thinking about when I was in school.
Grade school.
1979.

Fact of the matter is it was racism.


I'm 43. A bit younger, but I went to a fairly conservative Christian school. Ditto on the upper-middle aged teachers. I don't think they only just accepted "ain't" into their lexicon within that three-year span.
 
2020-07-03 3:53:38 AM  
 
2020-07-03 3:54:04 AM  

cman: baron von doodle: Cman, want to do the kangaroo word origin myth?

I dont know a single thing about the etymology of "kangaroo". Never actually thought of looking it up.


It's.... See link.
 
2020-07-03 3:55:39 AM  

baron von doodle: Wait.
We can fix decimate.

C-19 may very well decimate the United States of America.

33 mil? Good God I hope not. By the way, decimate is historically important. The officers in the Soviet Union circa WW1 and 2 would shoot 1 in 10 soldiers at random from any unit that deserted. So, keeping that word accurate is historically important. Nya 😝

Serious about the way Soviet troops were treated. Not so much about the rest.


I'm getting it.
And, if people don't practice social distancing and wearing of masks and all that other jazz,
C-19 may very well randomly kill one in ten Americans.
AKA decimate us like a Russian officer.
 
2020-07-03 3:57:21 AM  

waxbeans: baron von doodle: Wait.
We can fix decimate.

C-19 may very well decimate the United States of America.

33 mil? Good God I hope not. By the way, decimate is historically important. The officers in the Soviet Union circa WW1 and 2 would shoot 1 in 10 soldiers at random from any unit that deserted. So, keeping that word accurate is historically important. Nya 😝

Serious about the way Soviet troops were treated. Not so much about the rest.

I'm getting it.
And, if people don't practice social distancing and wearing of masks and all that other jazz,
C-19 may very well randomly kill one in ten Americans.
AKA decimate us like a Russian officer.


More or less. Not Russian though. Soviet. Different ish entities.
 
2020-07-03 3:57:33 AM  

Abacus9: I don't personally care, just pointing out the hypocrisy


There's a difference between full blown hypocrisy and just typing rapidly at 4am.

You got me.  Enjoy your laurels.  :)
 
2020-07-03 3:57:40 AM  

baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: waxbeans: Abacus9: waxbeans: Snapper Carr: Language evolves as its speakers change.  The word "irregardless" becomes common parlance, linguists are going to take note - eventually it ends up in the dictionary.

This is how language works.

Latin is dead.  It is unchanging.  No one speaks it outside of jargon from a handful of academic fields.

Exactly.

/
To all the teachers who say ain't isn't a word,
You should say yet.
U cu*nts.

Well, who used to.

"Ain't" is a word, and it's in the dictionary, too. None of my English teachers ever said otherwise.

I'm 46.
When I was in school the teachers were 60 years old.
At least to my eyes.
I'm sure that one English teacher was 30 or 40.
But yeah, I'm still thinking about when I was in school.
Grade school.
1979.

Fact of the matter is it was racism.

Qua? Ain't is racist?

I'm talking about when I was in school in 1979.

Fat, white, (and sometimes old)  ladies was very insistent that ain't wasn't a word they got God darn ambivalent about it.
I'm convinced it was racism.

Ah, sorry. I'm 39 btw.


Holy Christ on a cracker

1934
An unabridged dictionary was added in 1934 with 114,000 words. This is probably when "ain't" was added to the dictionary.

I guess this proves that those teachers were being racist
 
2020-07-03 3:57:46 AM  

baron von doodle: CrazyCurt: What needs to be understood is the English language is "The Borg". It is! It assimilates and changes to the whims and tastes of the era. Kindergarten is a German word but we English speakers know what it is. Mayonnaise? I can't even spell it right w/o spellcheckers and it's as American as Mayonnaise Pie ( seriously I failed twice -- I don't eat it much ). This absurd language gobbles up anything that fits, sounds cool or makes you laugh at the drop of a hat. I think English is the best language there is because it's a bit of every language.

/ We Are The Borg!

Well, yes, American English does the same thing to other languages that we do to food. We steal it, Americanize it and generally ruin the original intention.


Fark user imageView Full Size

Don't go looking for logic in language.
 
2020-07-03 3:57:49 AM  

baron von doodle: cman: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

Do you care that December is used as the 12th month and not the 10th?

If your gonna get upset about decimate you might as well be consistent.

Don't care about being consistent. Decimate hacks me off because they mean destroy or other synonyms. It originated in laziness and infected the language.


Didn't it come from the Roman practice of, upon losing a battle, the general or whoever was in charge would kill one tenth of his soldiers at random as punishment? Now people think it means to kill all but 10 percent. Weird hill to choose decimation upon.
 
2020-07-03 3:59:21 AM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: Written language died when teenagers got smart phones.

My lawn. Off it.


I blame the hipsters and their portmanteaus
 
2020-07-03 3:59:29 AM  

Abacus9: I understand that, and I never said the usage was "wrong". Only that is was "stupid", which is correct.


I get the distinct feeling you harp on people based on their regional Annunciation of words don't you?
 
2020-07-03 3:59:40 AM  

waxbeans: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: waxbeans: Abacus9: waxbeans: Snapper Carr: Language evolves as its speakers change.  The word "irregardless" becomes common parlance, linguists are going to take note - eventually it ends up in the dictionary.

This is how language works.

Latin is dead.  It is unchanging.  No one speaks it outside of jargon from a handful of academic fields.

Exactly.

/
To all the teachers who say ain't isn't a word,
You should say yet.
U cu*nts.

Well, who used to.

"Ain't" is a word, and it's in the dictionary, too. None of my English teachers ever said otherwise.

I'm 46.
When I was in school the teachers were 60 years old.
At least to my eyes.
I'm sure that one English teacher was 30 or 40.
But yeah, I'm still thinking about when I was in school.
Grade school.
1979.

Fact of the matter is it was racism.

Qua? Ain't is racist?

I'm talking about when I was in school in 1979.

Fat, white, (and sometimes old)  ladies was very insistent that ain't wasn't a word they got God darn ambivalent about it.
I'm convinced it was racism.

Ah, sorry. I'm 39 btw.

Holy Christ on a cracker

1934
An unabridged dictionary was added in 1934 with 114,000 words. This is probably when "ain't" was added to the dictionary.

I guess this proves that those teachers were being racist


Damn. '34.
 
2020-07-03 4:01:34 AM  

aerojockey: I can't think of a single time I've ever heard someone say "irregardless" non-ironically.


I occasionally say disirregardless to fark with people
 
2020-07-03 4:01:34 AM  

BafflerMeal: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

Wait.
We can fix decimate.

C-19 may very well decimate the United States of America.

33 mil? Good God I hope not. By the way, decimate is historically important. The officers in the Soviet Union circa WW1 and 2 would shoot 1 in 10 soldiers at random from any unit that deserted. So, keeping that word accurate is historically important. Nya 😝

I find it funny how everytime someone brings up the "history" of decimate as an example of "true meaning", it's from a different era, war, or country.


And it annoys me that a less than ten years after IT words I learned, they were already being misused and destroyed

The rage that fills my heart man
 
2020-07-03 4:02:03 AM  

baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.


The word's been in use to mean "destroyed a lot of" since the 1660s. Probably best to just let that one go.

/The word "Chair" goes back a bit farther but originally meant "throne" or "pulpit"
//It all changes
 
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