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(Twitter)   The English language is officially dead   (twitter.com) divider line
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8327 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Jul 2020 at 2:05 AM (21 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-07-03 2:33:27 AM  
Dope Smugglaz - The Word (Official Music Video)
Youtube WRq9PzI4_Ow
 
2020-07-03 2:36:12 AM  
Language evolves as its speakers change.  The word "irregardless" becomes common parlance, linguists are going to take note - eventually it ends up in the dictionary.

This is how language works.

Latin is dead.  It is unchanging.  No one speaks it outside of jargon from a handful of academic fields.
 
2020-07-03 2:37:02 AM  
If we can have flammable and inflammable we can have regardless and irregardless.
 
2020-07-03 2:37:02 AM  

aerojockey: I can't think of a single time I've ever heard someone say "irregardless" non-ironically.


As I said, why add another syllable if you don't have to?  It's like "orientate", which I also hate with the fire of a thousand suns.
 
2020-07-03 2:37:06 AM  

GardenWeasel: ecmoRandomNumbers: Written language died when teenagers got smart phones.

My lawn. Off it.

Nah, it died with T9


#Free T1
 
2020-07-03 2:38:00 AM  
C is for Contrafibularity | Blackadder The Third | BBC Comedy Greats
Youtube hOSYiT2iG08
 
2020-07-03 2:38:53 AM  

Snapper Carr: Language evolves as its speakers change.  The word "irregardless" becomes common parlance, linguists are going to take note - eventually it ends up in the dictionary.

This is how language works.

Latin is dead.  It is unchanging.  No one speaks it outside of jargon from a handful of academic fields.


Exactly.

/
To all the teachers who say ain't isn't a word,
You should say yet.
U cu*nts.

Well, who used to.
 
2020-07-03 2:39:10 AM  
Oh, well, in that case, sir, I hope you will not object if I also offer the Doctor my most enthusiastic contrafibularities. I'm anaspeptic, phrasmotic, even compunctuous to have caused you such pericombobulation.
 
2020-07-03 2:41:04 AM  
M-W has been including nonstandard words, labeled as "nonstandard," for many years now.
 
2020-07-03 2:42:04 AM  

fusillade762: abhorrent1: Irregardless is a perfectly cromulent word to use when conversating.

Why add an extra syllable when you don't need to.  Regardless means the same thing for all intensive purposes.


Now that's a whole nother kind of porpoise.
 
2020-07-03 2:44:06 AM  
Most human languages were developed by illiterates.  English was a group project by three sets of illiterates (Celts, Angles/Saxons/Jutes, Vikings/Danes/Norwegians) and semiliterate Normans.  Then the educated people had a go at it -- Samuel Johnson declaring that the gates of English are open and to keep it pure would be folly, "to lash the wind".

Then the Anglophones on one side of the pond decided to conquer most of their hemisphere and the Anglophones on the other decided to invite or force people of every nation to come over to our side of the pond and talked with them.

So English is an unwieldy, unstable, illogical mess.  That's why it has become a lingua franca.
 
2020-07-03 2:45:13 AM  
Yeah, its a living language. Suck it
 
2020-07-03 2:45:34 AM  
It's fine, languages evolve constantly. It's just a matter of time until "scroteblast" is being used daily. America needs this word, frankly.
 
2020-07-03 2:50:43 AM  

i ignore u: Well yeah, for all intensive porpoises.

[i.ytimg.com image 480x360]


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-03 2:52:00 AM  

studebaker hoch: The verbing of nouns.


The adverbing of adjectives.

/drive safe
//think different
///twitch
 
2020-07-03 2:52:19 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-03 2:52:21 AM  

i ignore u: Well yeah, for all intensive porpoises.

[i.ytimg.com image 480x360]


That's the flying ointment
 
2020-07-03 2:53:14 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-03 2:55:05 AM  

anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.


tabernac!
 
2020-07-03 2:59:27 AM  

i ignore u: Well yeah, for all intensive porpoises.

[i.ytimg.com image 480x360]


Chomping at the bit
 
2020-07-03 2:59:50 AM  

anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.


The American English dictionary DEFINATELY does not make the rules.
I'll wait until the Oxford English dictionary weighs in.
 
2020-07-03 3:00:42 AM  

anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.


This
 
2020-07-03 3:00:45 AM  

cman: I could care less (yes, that was intentional) what others feel about English

I speak American, so fark y'all.


I think this one is fine. It's like you cared so little that you didn't even bother to get the phrase right. I accept it.
 
2020-07-03 3:04:45 AM  
Eh, English died when we stopped using the long s.
 
2020-07-03 3:05:33 AM  
Decimate. Reduce by 10%.
 
2020-07-03 3:05:45 AM  

Begoggle: People are overexaggerating.


In German 'exaggerate' is 'übertrieben' which is like saying 'over propel' or 'over drive'.
 
2020-07-03 3:08:29 AM  

waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This


Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.
 
2020-07-03 3:10:09 AM  
I amn't hungry anymore. I already et.
 
2020-07-03 3:10:46 AM  
Not how it works. When a word gets added to an English dictionary, it's because the writers of that dictionary stopped being stubborn about it. And as backward as the word is considering what it's constructed from, when everyone who uses a word is wrong about what it means, you're actually wrong and they're right. That's how the language do.
 
2020-07-03 3:11:22 AM  
Oblig

The European Commission has just announced an agreement whereby English will be the official language of the EU rather than German which was the other possibility.
As part of the negotiations, Her Majesty's Government conceded that English spelling had some room for improvement and has accepted a five year phase-in plan that would be known as "Euro-English".
In the first year, "s" will replace the soft "c". Sertainly, this will make the sivil servants jump with joy. The hard "c" will be dropped in favour of the "k". This should klear up konfusion and keyboards kan have 1 less letter.
There will be growing publik enthusiasm in the sekond year, when the troublesome "ph" will be replaced with "f". This will make words like "fotograf" 20% shorter.
In the 3rd year, publik akseptanse of the new spelling kan be ekspekted to reach the stage where more komplikated changes are possible. Governments will enkorage the removal of double letters, which have always ben a deterent to akurate speling. Also, al wil agre that the horible mes of the silent "e"s in the language is disgraseful, and they should go away.
By the fourth year, peopl wil be reseptiv to steps such as replasing "th" with "z" and "w" with "v". During ze fifz year, ze unesesary "o" kan be dropd from vords kontaining "ou" and similar changes vud of kors be aplid to ozer kombinations of leters.
After zis fifz yer, ve vil hav a reli sensibl riten styl. Zer vil be no mor trubl or difikultis and evrivun vil find it ezi to understand ech ozer. Ze drem vil finali kum tru! And zen world!

Guten Tag.
 
2020-07-03 3:11:25 AM  

dkulprit: Can someone please show me the words tree where the words grow naturally and we harvest them to add to the dictionary so they are now officially words?

Words meanings get changed over time.

Words get created all the time irregardless of what you think.

Did you know you Shakespeare personally brought 500 words into the lexicon?  We add words here and there randomly after they have become used so often that they become words, but 1 guy, in his lifetime, brought 500 words into the lexicon.

Critics of this would hate him.  He brought "swagger", "lonely", "hint", and "critic" into the language just by using them in his plays.


I don't think the problem is so much with new words, the problem is stupidly used words. "Irregardless" is unnecessary because it means the same as "regardless", which not only preceded it, but is shorter thus more efficient. Whereas adding the prefix just shows ignorance of language and its roots.
 
2020-07-03 3:12:33 AM  

Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.


Fair enough.

But,
It was very enlightening to learn how false the attitude of teacher's was. They acted like English was set in stone. And, insisted that ain't wasn't a word. I wish I could tattoo yet on their foreheads.
Cu*ts
 
2020-07-03 3:15:25 AM  

Abacus9: dkulprit: Can someone please show me the words tree where the words grow naturally and we harvest them to add to the dictionary so they are now officially words?

Words meanings get changed over time.

Words get created all the time irregardless of what you think.

Did you know you Shakespeare personally brought 500 words into the lexicon?  We add words here and there randomly after they have become used so often that they become words, but 1 guy, in his lifetime, brought 500 words into the lexicon.

Critics of this would hate him.  He brought "swagger", "lonely", "hint", and "critic" into the language just by using them in his plays.

I don't think the problem is so much with new words, the problem is stupidly used words. "Irregardless" is unnecessary because it means the same as "regardless", which not only preceded it, but is shorter thus more efficient. Whereas adding the prefix just shows ignorance of language and its roots.


You're completely missing the point.
Usage is the authority here not how you feel.
 
2020-07-03 3:17:06 AM  
This really burns me up.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-03 3:23:41 AM  

Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.


You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.
 
2020-07-03 3:24:01 AM  

in flagrante: Spartapuss: Hoisted on it's own petard.

its!

I've personally never heard anyone use the word 'irregardless' when speaking.  In print, the only time I've come across it is in written diatribes bemoaning the collapse of civilization as we know it....usually written by people who are trying very hard to justify those liberal arts degrees.   I honestly think we're ok here.

Clichéd idioms bother me a lot more than mutated single words.  I could live the rest of my life pretty comfortably if I never heard "at the end of the day" again.  You probably all have your own favourites as well.


I could be wrong, but shouldn't that be "if I'd never heard", because it's subjunctive?
 
2020-07-03 3:24:33 AM  

Nullav: Not how it works. When a word gets added to an English dictionary, it's because the writers of that dictionary stopped being stubborn about it. And as backward as the word is considering what it's constructed from, when everyone who uses a word is wrong about what it means, you're actually wrong and they're right. That's how the language do.


Fine. Then what do we use for Scrabble?
 
2020-07-03 3:25:08 AM  

phishrace: This really burns me up.

[Fark user image 425x566]


I can't wait until "unflammable" catches on and we start having more problems with that.
 
2020-07-03 3:25:13 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-03 3:26:16 AM  
Madness in great ones must not unwatched go.
 
2020-07-03 3:26:58 AM  

Abacus9: in flagrante: Spartapuss: Hoisted on it's own petard.

its!

I've personally never heard anyone use the word 'irregardless' when speaking.  In print, the only time I've come across it is in written diatribes bemoaning the collapse of civilization as we know it....usually written by people who are trying very hard to justify those liberal arts degrees.   I honestly think we're ok here.

Clichéd idioms bother me a lot more than mutated single words.  I could live the rest of my life pretty comfortably if I never heard "at the end of the day" again.  You probably all have your own favourites as well.

I could be wrong, but shouldn't that be "if I'd never heard", because it's subjunctive?


Yes, because online grammar is always correct. Chat Nazi.
 
2020-07-03 3:27:02 AM  

baron von doodle: Nullav: Not how it works. When a word gets added to an English dictionary, it's because the writers of that dictionary stopped being stubborn about it. And as backward as the word is considering what it's constructed from, when everyone who uses a word is wrong about what it means, you're actually wrong and they're right. That's how the language do.

Fine. Then what do we use for Scrabble?


An argument that can convince at least two other players. Coincidentally, this is the only known mechanism for officially adding words to the language.
 
2020-07-03 3:27:33 AM  

Nullav: phishrace: This really burns me up.

[Fark user image 425x566]

I can't wait until "unflammable" catches on and we start having more problems with that.


Inflammable even.
 
2020-07-03 3:27:36 AM  

baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.


i.imgflip.comView Full Size
 
2020-07-03 3:28:15 AM  

Nullav: phishrace: This really burns me up.

[Fark user image 425x566]

I can't wait until "unflammable" catches on and we start having more problems with that.


I'm holding out until "flimflammable."

/no, i'm not
 
2020-07-03 3:28:28 AM  
Now we must undo Mathematics with Eleventy!

/ Just before Umpteenth.
 
2020-07-03 3:28:43 AM  

baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.


No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?
 
2020-07-03 3:29:08 AM  

waxbeans: Snapper Carr: Language evolves as its speakers change.  The word "irregardless" becomes common parlance, linguists are going to take note - eventually it ends up in the dictionary.

This is how language works.

Latin is dead.  It is unchanging.  No one speaks it outside of jargon from a handful of academic fields.

Exactly.

/
To all the teachers who say ain't isn't a word,
You should say yet.
U cu*nts.

Well, who used to.


"Ain't" is a word, and it's in the dictionary, too. None of my English teachers ever said otherwise.
 
2020-07-03 3:29:10 AM  

Nullav: baron von doodle: Nullav: Not how it works. When a word gets added to an English dictionary, it's because the writers of that dictionary stopped being stubborn about it. And as backward as the word is considering what it's constructed from, when everyone who uses a word is wrong about what it means, you're actually wrong and they're right. That's how the language do.

Fine. Then what do we use for Scrabble?

An argument that can convince at least two other players. Coincidentally, this is the only known mechanism for officially adding words to the language.


Fine. I'll use my official Scrabble dictionary from 99. 😁
 
2020-07-03 3:31:12 AM  

waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?


I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.
 
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