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(SFGate)   Man, the Confederates haven't had their asses whipped this bad in Richmond since 1865   (sfgate.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, American Civil War, Confederate States of America, Virginia, outbreak of the Civil War, Southern United States, West Virginia, Richmond, Virginia, United States Navy  
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5543 clicks; posted to Main » and Politics » on 02 Jul 2020 at 10:18 PM (17 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-07-03 3:37:05 AM  

Moniker o' Shame: grumpfuff: Moniker o' Shame: Keep on pulling down those statues of Democrats.  They really have a despicable record where race relations are concerned.

Try smarter, not harder.

1861 Confederate States of America
1862-1968 Jim Crow Laws
1866 Ku Klux Klan
1868 14th Amendment with 0% Democrat support
1870 15th Amendment with 0% Democrat support
1937 Hugo Black, a Klansman appointed to the US Supreme Court by F.D. Roosevelt
1942-1946 F.D. Roosevelt orders the internment of Japanese American citizens
1953-1959 Robert Byrd, Exalted Cyclops of the Klan elected to the US Senate as a Democrat
1964 Civil Rights Act opposed by more Democrats than Republicans, signed by Democrat President Johnson who called it the "N Act."
2010 Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden gave eulogies for Robert Byrd, referring to him as a mentor.

The facts are just not on your side.  One party was founded on abolition of slavery and the other has a long and brutal hit list of racial problems.


What happened in '68 and thereabouts? Something, I'm sure...man, you sure to skip over a lotta decades right after '64, dontcha?

What could it be?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Souther​n​_strategy
 
2020-07-03 3:44:27 AM  

Moniker o' Shame: grumpfuff: Moniker o' Shame: Keep on pulling down those statues of Democrats.  They really have a despicable record where race relations are concerned.

Try smarter, not harder.

1861 Confederate States of America
1862-1968 Jim Crow Laws
1866 Ku Klux Klan
1868 14th Amendment with 0% Democrat support
1870 15th Amendment with 0% Democrat support
1937 Hugo Black, a Klansman appointed to the US Supreme Court by F.D. Roosevelt
1942-1946 F.D. Roosevelt orders the internment of Japanese American citizens
1953-1959 Robert Byrd, Exalted Cyclops of the Klan elected to the US Senate as a Democrat
1964 Civil Rights Act opposed by more Democrats than Republicans, signed by Democrat President Johnson who called it the "N Act."
2010 Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden gave eulogies for Robert Byrd, referring to him as a mentor.

The facts are just not on your side.  One party was founded on abolition of slavery and the other has a long and brutal hit list of racial problems.


Strange, you seem to have left out the Southern Strategy and Byrd apologizing for his past, and saying he'll apologize as much as he needs. Why did you leave those out?

Like I said. Smarter, not harder.
 
2020-07-03 3:47:22 AM  

waxbeans: Turbo Cojones: Moniker o' Shame: grumpfuff: Moniker o' Shame: Keep on pulling down those statues of Democrats.  They really have a despicable record where race relations are concerned.

Try smarter, not harder.

1861 Confederate States of America
1862-1968 Jim Crow Laws
1866 Ku Klux Klan
1868 14th Amendment with 0% Democrat support
1870 15th Amendment with 0% Democrat support
1937 Hugo Black, a Klansman appointed to the US Supreme Court by F.D. Roosevelt
1942-1946 F.D. Roosevelt orders the internment of Japanese American citizens
1953-1959 Robert Byrd, Exalted Cyclops of the Klan elected to the US Senate as a Democrat
1964 Civil Rights Act opposed by more Democrats than Republicans, signed by Democrat President Johnson who called it the "N Act."
2010 Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden gave eulogies for Robert Byrd, referring to him as a mentor.

The facts are just not on your side.  One party was founded on abolition of slavery and the other has a long and brutal hit list of racial problems.

And Dump used to be a Democrat.  People change.  get over it

Dead people don't change. So, yeah, those dead people are marred by their choices. Let it go. Bury them the idolization of them.


RandolphCarter: With respect to Senator Robert Byrd, you left out the part where, in 1952, he announced he had stopped being a member of the Klan.

You also left out the part where he spent his entire national political career apologizing for being a racist when he was young.


I had no idea 2010 came before 1952. Stop leaving out the bits inconvenient for your lame attempts. Its f*cking obvious.
 
2020-07-03 5:37:55 AM  

otherideas: dkulprit: Weatherkiss: But how will future generations of Americans know that someone wasn't the father?

I know the feeling one day my daughter is going to ask "daddy, who was stonewall Jackson", and I won't know what to tell her.  I won't have a giant statue of a man displayed heroically to tell her:

"He was a piece shiat who went to war to own people like livestock and beasts of burden."

But without all these statues I will say "who?  I don't know, he may have been have been someone who did something with a stone wall?"

Then she'll say "we learned about him in school, he seemed like a bad man."

And then I'll say, "must be lies, the only history we have is in statues and schools wouldn't teach you about something that didn't have a statue."

And then her crying "but I learned about it today."

And then I'll say "quit lying without statues there's no history, without statues either you're lying or those 'liberal intellectuals' are lying to your now go daddy a Budweiser before he takes off his belt like liars deserve."

Actually you can say he was a Virginian who was born and raised in the USA, went to West Point, and when he state seceded from the US to create a new country, which they had every right to do under the Constitution, he fought for his State with bravery and skill until he was shot by by accident by his own men while he was performing reconnaissance.


and he has as memorial in his honor in a all-black church installed their by the children of former slaves.
 
2020-07-03 6:54:50 AM  

Moniker o' Shame: Keep on pulling down those statues of Democrats.  They really have a despicable record where race relations are concerned.


The Republican Party of Virginia called Stoney's actions illegal, but no court challenge has surfaced.

Weird how the so-called party of Lincoln doesn't want the statues taken down...
 
2020-07-03 6:57:38 AM  

Weatherkiss: But how will future generations of Americans know that someone wasn't the father?


Well, that does it. Now I'm on the fence about voting for Jefferson Davis.
 
2020-07-03 7:13:51 AM  

Moniker o' Shame: Byrd 1959-2010 as a Senator (I made an error).


Another error:

1964 Civil Rights Act opposed by more Democrats than Republicans, signed by Democrat President

You left out the part about it being supported by more Democrats than Republicans.

And one of the Republicans who voted against it was the GOP nominee for president in '64, and yet there were quite a few embarrassed Republicans who admitted that Goldwater was appealing to racists.

You should read some of the things written by black Republicans who bailed on the party when Goldwater was nominated. Jackie Robinson, for example, compared attending  the '64 GOP convention to feeling like a Jew in Nazi Germany.

/That was the REAL Blexit.
 
2020-07-03 7:18:31 AM  

The Repeated Meme: Once all the WASP statues have been taken down, I guess it will be time to deal with teh joooos


<deep thoughts.jpg>
 
2020-07-03 7:36:31 AM  

Turbo Cojones: And Dump used to be a Democrat.  People change.  get over it


Trump didn't change, democrats and republicans changed.  People don't want to recognize it, but everything today's republicans stand for and represent is the democrats of old.  Trump knows this, and made sure he stayed with his friends.
 
2020-07-03 7:55:13 AM  

otherideas: dkulprit: Weatherkiss: But how will future generations of Americans know that someone wasn't the father?

I know the feeling one day my daughter is going to ask "daddy, who was stonewall Jackson", and I won't know what to tell her.  I won't have a giant statue of a man displayed heroically to tell her:

"He was a piece shiat who went to war to own people like livestock and beasts of burden."

But without all these statues I will say "who?  I don't know, he may have been have been someone who did something with a stone wall?"

Then she'll say "we learned about him in school, he seemed like a bad man."

And then I'll say, "must be lies, the only history we have is in statues and schools wouldn't teach you about something that didn't have a statue."

And then her crying "but I learned about it today."

And then I'll say "quit lying without statues there's no history, without statues either you're lying or those 'liberal intellectuals' are lying to your now go daddy a Budweiser before he takes off his belt like liars deserve."

Actually you can say he was a Virginian who was born and raised in the USA, went to West Point, and when he state seceded from the US to create a new country, which they had every right to do under the Constitution, he fought for his State with bravery and skill until he was shot by by accident by his own men while he was performing reconnaissance.


You could say that, but it would be a lie.
 
2020-07-03 8:05:23 AM  

SirDigbyChickenCaesar: someone doesn't know the history of who Maury was


Exactly. I'm sad to hear the rest of his story. He's a towering figure in oceanorgraphic exploration and it's unfortunate that he felt the Confederacy was something he'd rather work on.  I never knew about the second part of his life.
 
2020-07-03 8:34:48 AM  

Truck Fump: SirDigbyChickenCaesar: someone doesn't know the history of who Maury was

Exactly. I'm sad to hear the rest of his story. He's a towering figure in oceanorgraphic exploration and it's unfortunate that he felt the Confederacy was something he'd rather work on.  I never knew about the second part of his life.


he didn't love the confederacy, he loved Virginia.  It was different back then, it was a true federal republic.  People were loyal to their state not the nation.
 
2020-07-03 9:18:54 AM  

Mukster: I hit a paywall... can someone explain why they're mad about a statue of Matthew McConaugahy?

[Fark user image image 500x697]


Mainly because it wasn't great, it was just alright, alright, alright.
 
2020-07-03 10:26:40 AM  

waxbeans: Turbo Cojones: Moniker o' Shame: grumpfuff: Moniker o' Shame: Keep on pulling down those statues of Democrats.  They really have a despicable record where race relations are concerned.

Try smarter, not harder.

1861 Confederate States of America
1862-1968 Jim Crow Laws
1866 Ku Klux Klan
1868 14th Amendment with 0% Democrat support
1870 15th Amendment with 0% Democrat support
1937 Hugo Black, a Klansman appointed to the US Supreme Court by F.D. Roosevelt
1942-1946 F.D. Roosevelt orders the internment of Japanese American citizens
1953-1959 Robert Byrd, Exalted Cyclops of the Klan elected to the US Senate as a Democrat
1964 Civil Rights Act opposed by more Democrats than Republicans, signed by Democrat President Johnson who called it the "N Act."
2010 Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden gave eulogies for Robert Byrd, referring to him as a mentor.

The facts are just not on your side.  One party was founded on abolition of slavery and the other has a long and brutal hit list of racial problems.

And Dump used to be a Democrat.  People change.  get over it

Dead people don't change. So, yeah, those dead people are marred by their choices. Let it go. Bury them the idolization of them.


They keep mentioning Byrd.  NAACP reported that he voted with them 100% of the time after becoming human.  Yeah, he changed.
 
2020-07-03 11:06:15 AM  

SirDigbyChickenCaesar: Truck Fump: SirDigbyChickenCaesar: someone doesn't know the history of who Maury was

Exactly. I'm sad to hear the rest of his story. He's a towering figure in oceanorgraphic exploration and it's unfortunate that he felt the Confederacy was something he'd rather work on.  I never knew about the second part of his life.

he didn't love the confederacy, he loved Virginia.  It was different back then, it was a true federal republic.  People were loyal to their state not the nation.


Not all of them.

Many southern soldiers remained loyal when their states seceded; 40 percent of Virginian officers in the United States military, for example, stayed with the Union.[8] During the war, many Southern Unionists went North and joined the Union armies. Others joined when Union armies entered their hometowns in Tennessee, Virginia, Arkansas, Louisiana and elsewhere. Over 100,000 Southern Unionists served in the Union Army during the Civil War, and every Southern state except South Carolina raised at least a battalion.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Souther​n​_Unionist
 
2020-07-03 11:43:50 AM  

otherideas: dkulprit: Weatherkiss: But how will future generations of Americans know that someone wasn't the father?

I know the feeling one day my daughter is going to ask "daddy, who was stonewall Jackson", and I won't know what to tell her.  I won't have a giant statue of a man displayed heroically to tell her:

"He was a piece shiat who went to war to own people like livestock and beasts of burden."

But without all these statues I will say "who?  I don't know, he may have been have been someone who did something with a stone wall?"

Then she'll say "we learned about him in school, he seemed like a bad man."

And then I'll say, "must be lies, the only history we have is in statues and schools wouldn't teach you about something that didn't have a statue."

And then her crying "but I learned about it today."

And then I'll say "quit lying without statues there's no history, without statues either you're lying or those 'liberal intellectuals' are lying to your now go daddy a Budweiser before he takes off his belt like liars deserve."

Actually you can say he was a Virginian who was born and raised in the USA, went to West Point, and when he state seceded from the US to create a new country, which they had every right to do under the Constitution, he fought for his State with bravery and skill until he was shot by by accident by his own men while he was performing reconnaissance.


whyd his state want to leave the union again?
 
2020-07-03 5:53:18 PM  

Moniker o' Shame: 1868 14th Amendment with 0% Democrat support
1870 15th Amendment with 0% Democrat support


Supporting the white supremacist case against Washington, conservative movement builders vehemently opposed civil rights legislation. The National Review broadcast the case against the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that was first developed by southern defenders of segregation. As Buckley later reminded the magazine's publisher: "I feel a considerable debt of gratitude to the [Virginia] Commission [on Constitutional Government] for permitting us to publish free of charge and without assigning them the credit, the[ir] extensive analysis of the civil rights bill." The Civil Rights Act, Commission member Kilpatrick had written, "would undermine the most precious rights of property." If "the citizen's right to discriminate" should "be destroyed, the whole basis of individual liberty is destroyed."18 The Civil Rights Act would abrogate the nation's liberties and undo its finest traditions. "The right to own, and possess, and manage property is vital," Kilpatrick insisted, as he portrayed any restriction on owners' rights as a death threat to the vision of the nation's founders.19 Robert Bork argued that it was sophistry to distinguish property rights and human rights; property rights were human rights of the highest order and "individual liberty" depended on their sanctity. The issue, he said, "is not whether racial prejudice is a good thing but whether individual men ought to be free to deal and associate with whom they please for whatever reasons appeal to them." For anyone to tell these white citizens "that even as individuals they may not act on their racial preferences" was "unsurpassed ugliness."

From early on, in fact, northern as well as southern conservative thinkers identified the Union cause in the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the New Deal as interrelated aspects of a "Liberal" threat that usurped the rights of property owners and states. Conservative intellectuals who discussed Emancipation portrayed it as one of the greatest violations of the rights of private property in world history. For them, its import was not the freeing of persons, but the expropriation of property. Wilmoore Kendall, the mentor of Buckley and Russell Kirk, claimed that the contemporary "war" between liberals and conservatives "began as a war of aggression, launched . . . by the Liberals," who had attacked "the victim's territory in the 1860s and 1870s" in the form of "emancipation of the slaves in the name of equality, [and] the post-Civil War 'equality' amendments to the Constitution."

Conservatives were similarly contemptuous of democratic modifications to the Constitution after its ratification, above all the Fourteenth Amendment, which became the scaffold for many kinds of reform. Explaining his support for whites who deprived blacks of the vote, Buckley announced: "the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments to the Constitution are regarded by much of the South as inorganic accretions to the original document, grafted upon it by victors-at-war by force."
Attacks on the legitimacy of the Fourteenth Amendment became a veritable cottage industry on the right, and a centerpiece of its leaders' advocacy of "authentic federalism."47 Today, most conservatives are more discrete, but as late as 1978 the publisher Henry Regnery insisted that the Fourteenth Amendment had never "properly" become "part of the Constitution" and was therefore illegitimate.48

http://havensarchive.lss.wisc.edu/fil​e​s/Maclean-neo-confederacy.pdf
 
2020-07-03 9:45:01 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: Erik_Emune: phalamir: b2theory: Makes sense. There aren't statues for the Nazi leadership in Germany

More accurately, there aren't statues of Nazi leaders in England.

We wouldn't put a memorial for allied airmen in Hamburg, even. And those guys were bona fide heroes, it's just that it's NOT BLOODY DONE.

Terror bombing cities at night doesn't make you a hero. It makes you a war criminal.

The Americans bombed during the day, so they at least could aim at legitimate targets.


"Aim" being the operative word, because they, too, missed their targets to the same degree you missed the point.
 
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