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(TreeHugger)   When the pandemic is but a distant memory, our homes will be bigger, have more outdoor social spaces, and tiny quarantine rooms in the attic next to the fire stairs   (treehugger.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Kitchen, Rooms, Dining room, work station, big pantry, Thought, New Urbanism, Mind  
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548 clicks; posted to Geek » on 30 Jun 2020 at 5:20 AM (10 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



22 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-06-30 5:25:02 AM  
If I was to do anything different, I would make a much larger pantry for food storage.
 
2020-06-30 5:26:24 AM  
And it will apparently a glorious day for the ceramic tile industry.
 
2020-06-30 5:35:34 AM  
No. None of these predictions are going to happen.
 
2020-06-30 5:51:29 AM  
I predict they will be considerably smaller.

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2020-06-30 6:28:51 AM  

Tom Marvolo Bombadil: I predict they will be considerably smaller.

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Yes, sweetie. The entire globe will die. God, out a sock in it.
 
2020-06-30 6:32:49 AM  

AAAAGGGGHHHH: No. None of these predictions are going to happen.


I think you will see more washrooms at the entrance. But that's about it.
 
2020-06-30 6:47:56 AM  

LaChanz: If I was to do anything different, I would make a much larger pantry for food storage.


Part of my living room is now a pantry. And kitchen.  Sigh.
 
TWX [TotalFark]
2020-06-30 7:13:59 AM  
From TFA: We'll want offices with doors we can close. We'll want dedicated spaces for home schooling if we need to keep doing that. We'll want bigger pantries to hold the food we're now storing "just in case," and we'll want a place to exercise.That means we'll be seeking more square footage with a hybrid concept - part open (for cooking, eating and being entertained) concept, part closed-concept (for working, schooling, exercising).


This is basically what I have.  I live in a custom home built in the late 1970s, before the concept of the open floorplan grew out to ridiculous levels.  The living room, family room, dining room, library, and kitchen are not completely separated with doors, but they're distinct rooms requiring walking through open passageways to transition through.  It would be easy enough to turn these passageways into closable doors if needed, though would require some care to maintain HVAC air return.

Having this kind of space is nice, but for something the article doesn't really address, and that is variety through the day.  I have my choice of where I spend my time, both inside and out, and that helps break up the monotony of being home so much without the option for going out.  I'm not stuck in one room, and I'm not stuck in the same room as the rest of the family if I need a break.
 
2020-06-30 7:17:07 AM  
Firepits.  In this pandemic age, everyone I know is buying or building backyard firepits.
 
2020-06-30 7:20:55 AM  
When I was in school, I designed a mansion with a formal entryway with an inner set of doors, and off to one side, the back door of a bathroom with a shower, with two doors.  All arranged so that the entryway functioned as and airlock, and the bathroom as a decontamination shower.

But it all looked like regular residential architecture.
 
2020-06-30 7:50:06 AM  
Shouldn't that be "What will rich peoples homes be like after the pandemic?" because most Americans are going to be lucky to have enough space to stretch much less do all that on their budgets.
 
2020-06-30 8:22:06 AM  

Nimbull: Shouldn't that be "What will rich peoples homes be like after the pandemic?" because most Americans are going to be lucky to have enough space to stretch much less do all that on their budgets.


This was my thought. Are we all magically rich in the future? It finally trickles down, maybe?
 
2020-06-30 8:30:48 AM  

AAAAGGGGHHHH: No. None of these predictions are going to happen.


You mean the average person won't have a four-story 5000 sf apartment with four parking spaces?  Rather pessimistic of you.
 
2020-06-30 9:23:20 AM  
In a sign that this is truly the apocalypse, the smartest thing in that whole article is the comments section.

"50 million unemployed seems like it will have a more profound effect on home design than "people want more square footage"

"Oh god, the acoustics in those tile homes!"

"What people want is "affordable" homes. Lots of space equals lots of money so I would suspect most new "post-pandemic" homes will be on the smaller size."
 
2020-06-30 9:34:46 AM  

AAAAGGGGHHHH: No. None of these predictions are going to happen.


This. Most of the US has already defaulted to "relax it'll be fine it's not a big deal" so why bother doing anything different?
 
2020-06-30 10:03:58 AM  

DecemberNitro: AAAAGGGGHHHH: No. None of these predictions are going to happen.

This. Most of the US has already defaulted to "relax it'll be fine it's not a big deal" so why bother doing anything different?


That and renovations cost time and money and while we might have a lot of time pretty much none of us will have money.
 
2020-06-30 10:08:03 AM  

LaChanz: If I was to do anything different, I would make a much larger pantry for food storage.


Ideally in the basement or dug out area near the house, in a room that's naturally very cool.  A root cellar if you will.
 
2020-06-30 10:59:34 AM  

PhilGed: In a sign that this is truly the apocalypse, the smartest thing in that whole article is the comments section.

"50 million unemployed seems like it will have a more profound effect on home design than "people want more square footage"

"Oh god, the acoustics in those tile homes!"

"What people want is "affordable" homes. Lots of space equals lots of money so I would suspect most new "post-pandemic" homes will be on the smaller size."


Depends on what happens with offices long term. If most jobs shift to permantly offering work from home to reduce the number of people in the office, then a lot of people in larger cities will start to migrate further away to cheaper areas where they can get a larger home for less money.
 
2020-06-30 11:59:52 AM  

MindStalker: AAAAGGGGHHHH: No. None of these predictions are going to happen.

I think you will see more washrooms at the entrance. But that's about it.


I've lived in a house with a "mudroom".  It held the washer & dryer, and had a door that connected to the outside (but it was the backyard ... although it also connected to the foyer / entryway ... which acted as an airlock to the ground floor, but for some reason had an open stairwell to upstairs).

My neighbors extended their house, and cut off their old mudroom (which was more like a shed to act as an airlock to the back of the house) and put on a room with a shower & sink off to the side ... but there was a stupid design flaw, as the bathroom was small, and a PITA to use because of the way the door swung.  (they should've used a pocket door)

I envision more mudroom type entrances (possibly separate from the main entrance, so people don't leave through the possibly contaminated room), designed like a "wet" bathroom, where all of the walls are waterproof, and there's a center floor drain.  I'm not sure how the clothes washer would be handled ... maybe in the adjacent room with a little door to pass dirty clothes through, so it wouldn't get wet if you had to spray everything down

I also suspect that we'll have more things like wall mounted flip-down desks and tables, futons, day beds and murphy beds, so we can more easily change our spaces around for specific purposes, but then put them away to make more room for other activities.

/has a murphy bed / desk combo in my home office / guest room.
 
2020-06-30 12:19:06 PM  
This reminds me how every Sunday the newspaper has a section on "homes".  It's more like an advertisement for various architects and high-end remodelers.

I can't read it without getting somewhat disgusted.  The people in those articles live in an alternate reality where having the best home/cabin on the block/lake and the most possessions is the most important pursuit in life.

To me contentment comes from living a simple life spent following enjoyable pursuits and enjoying time with loved ones.  To me, more sqft = more vacuuming, upkeep and cost.  Who wants to clean 5+ toilets?  Or make someone else, who likely has better things to do, clean them for you?

I just want a roof over my head that I won't get evicted from.
 
2020-07-01 8:31:44 AM  
With enough living space for 13 families!

comrade kaprugina delivers a scolding
Youtube mq__Z-Z_Ofs
 
2020-07-01 11:51:39 AM  

zeroflight222: LaChanz: If I was to do anything different, I would make a much larger pantry for food storage.

Ideally in the basement or dug out area near the house, in a room that's naturally very cool.  A root cellar if you will.


I have space for that but the work to make it critter proof is daunting.

Invincible: Nimbull: Shouldn't that be "What will rich peoples homes be like after the pandemic?" because most Americans are going to be lucky to have enough space to stretch much less do all that on their budgets.

This was my thought. Are we all magically rich in the future? It finally trickles down, maybe?


Those that wait for it to "trickle down" will be always waiting.
 
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