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(Forbes)   Mystery unmanned craft seen off Florida may be secret spy vessel ...or a new shark species that goes by the name SHARC   (forbes.com) divider line
    More: Strange, Submarine, Sonar, Wave Glider, part of a U.S. Navy program, Radar, low profile make Wave Gliders, Current R&D budget documents, U.S. companyLiquid Robotics  
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3574 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Jun 2020 at 3:30 PM (6 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



25 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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6 days ago  
Fark user imageView Full Size

It's okay.  It's only Cate Archer.
 
6 days ago  
That "sharc" is a vicious predator. It ate a girl this morning. Pretty gruesome. To make matters worse, she had dandruff!

The rescuers knew this because they found her head and shoulders on the beach.
 
6 days ago  

Al Roker's Forecast: That "sharc" is a vicious predator. It ate a girl this morning. Pretty gruesome. To make matters worse, she had dandruff!

The rescuers knew this because they found her head and shoulders on the beach.


Boo.gif
 
6 days ago  
Dangerboat.
 
6 days ago  
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Could be worse.
 
6 days ago  
The Navy's sub-hunting Wave Glider is known as Sensor Hosting Autonomous Research Craft, or SHARC. In 2011 the Navy started equipping their experimental SHARC gliders with the 'Towed Array Integrated "L"  (TAIL),' a passive towed acoustic array. This is a set of specialized sensitive hydrophones which take advantage of the glider's quiet propulsion to pick up distant marine engines. (It also gives the acronym SHARC TAIL).

I don't know how good the Modern Towed arrays are, but I do know the mid-80's version that US subs towed behind them was so good a sub off the coast of  California was able to identify a freighter in the Sea of Japan because it's propeller had a slight nick in it that gave it a distinctive sound
 
6 days ago  

Al Roker's Forecast: That "sharc" is a vicious predator. It ate a girl this morning. Pretty gruesome. To make matters worse, she had dandruff!

The rescuers knew this because they found her head and shoulders on the beach.


The Challenger era would like its jokes back.
 
6 days ago  
Probably a Navy buoy as TFA suggests or maybe it belongs to  NOAA and is just collecting data.

Everybody Panic!!
 
6 days ago  
lh3.googleusercontent.comView Full Size
 
6 days ago  
Fark user imageView Full Size


/steaming piles of shiat
//crappy IO and failure to embrace Moores law
///COTS x86 ended up eating their lunch
 
6 days ago  
cdn.motor1.comView Full Size
 
6 days ago  

Magorn: The Navy's sub-hunting Wave Glider is known as Sensor Hosting Autonomous Research Craft, or SHARC. In 2011 the Navy started equipping their experimental SHARC gliders with the 'Towed Array Integrated "L"  (TAIL),' a passive towed acoustic array. This is a set of specialized sensitive hydrophones which take advantage of the glider's quiet propulsion to pick up distant marine engines. (It also gives the acronym SHARC TAIL).

I don't know how good the Modern Towed arrays are, but I do know the mid-80's version that US subs towed behind them was so good a sub off the coast of  California was able to identify a freighter in the Sea of Japan because it's propeller had a slight nick in it that gave it a distinctive sound


Like whales humping?
 
6 days ago  

FarkingSmurf: Magorn: The Navy's sub-hunting Wave Glider is known as Sensor Hosting Autonomous Research Craft, or SHARC. In 2011 the Navy started equipping their experimental SHARC gliders with the 'Towed Array Integrated "L"  (TAIL),' a passive towed acoustic array. This is a set of specialized sensitive hydrophones which take advantage of the glider's quiet propulsion to pick up distant marine engines. (It also gives the acronym SHARC TAIL).

I don't know how good the Modern Towed arrays are, but I do know the mid-80's version that US subs towed behind them was so good a sub off the coast of  California was able to identify a freighter in the Sea of Japan because it's propeller had a slight nick in it that gave it a distinctive sound

Like whales humping?


you know my ex?
 
6 days ago  
Oh Jesus, how long before some Florida Man drags one of these taxpayer funded devices ashore and dismantles it in a fury of methamphetamine and ennui?

I would like Hazards to Navigation for 400, Alex.
 
6 days ago  
What an unidentified craft off the Florida Coast May look like:

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
6 days ago  

Magorn: The Navy's sub-hunting Wave Glider is known as Sensor Hosting Autonomous Research Craft, or SHARC. In 2011 the Navy started equipping their experimental SHARC gliders with the 'Towed Array Integrated "L"  (TAIL),' a passive towed acoustic array. This is a set of specialized sensitive hydrophones which take advantage of the glider's quiet propulsion to pick up distant marine engines. (It also gives the acronym SHARC TAIL).

I don't know how good the Modern Towed arrays are, but I do know the mid-80's version that US subs towed behind them was so good a sub off the coast of  California was able to identify a freighter in the Sea of Japan because it's propeller had a slight nick in it that gave it a distinctive sound


The antenna array looks to be a direction finding array. For the marine band, 150 mhz.
 
6 days ago  
That's an Imperial Probe Droid.
 
6 days ago  

Coincidentally_Ironic: Al Roker's Forecast: That "sharc" is a vicious predator. It ate a girl this morning. Pretty gruesome. To make matters worse, she had dandruff!

The rescuers knew this because they found her head and shoulders on the beach.

The Challenger era would like its jokes back.


Everything from that era is washed up.
 
6 days ago  

SirDigbyChickenCaesar: That's an Imperial Probe Droid.


It's a good bet the Empire knows we are here..
 
6 days ago  
This is an interesting conundrum:  If you're a submarine, how do you counter this sort of thing?

They're silent, so you can't hear them.   They're small, so even if you did decide to "ping" them, which you wouldn't, but even if you did you probably wouldn't get any kind of a return off it.

Looking at it, thought, that array of 4 antennas looks like it's a radio direction finding antenna, specifically, a Doppler-based design.  So I suspect it's got other missions than hunting submarines.

I'm betting much of the use for these things is to catch drug smugglers.

All commercial vessels of any size, and all commercial passenger vessels, are required to have AIS:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automat​i​c_identification_system

That transmits location, course, speed, and a unique identifier for every vessel.   The only vessels that aren't required to have it are pleasure craft and military vessels.   For those, you need to locate them in other ways.  So radio directlon finding of their VHF marine band transmissions is a way to do that in areas like the Florida keys, the Caribbean, and the Gulf of Mexico.

Thing is, VHF transmissions are short range.   Range is dependent on the height of the antennas at both the transmitter and the receiver*, so this isn't going to have a super great range, but it doesn't need to, not really.  I'm betting it's cheap enough you can have several of them covering an area.

Drug smugglers won't use AIS for obvious reasons, and in the middle of the ocean out of sight of land, they won't get a cell signal, so VHF radio is an obvious thing to use if you're trying to meet to transfer cargo, like from an LPV or Narco sub to a go-fast or something.


*The formula is range in miles = 1.4 * squareroot(height in feet).  So two sailboats, both with masthead antennas, both with 30 foot masts, would have a theoretical maximum range of (1.4 * sqr(30) ) * 2 = ~15 statute miles.  You have to add the two together.
 
6 days ago  
SHARCNADO?
 
6 days ago  
It's a giant dolphin... with rabies... 
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
6 days ago  

baronbloodbath: What an unidentified craft off the Florida Coast May look like:

[Fark user image 425x242]


Compliance.
 
6 days ago  

Truck Fump: The antenna array looks to be a direction finding array. For the marine band, 150 mhz.


Mm. Thank you, Mr Data.

/snaps tunic into place
 
6 days ago  
I'm a SHARC.  Suck my DIC
 
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