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(The New York Times)   College towns are being destroyed by Coronavirus and it could take a decade to recover   (nytimes.com) divider line
    More: Murica, College town, Pennsylvania State University, Penn State Nittany Lions football, Ithaca, New York, Jonesboro, Arkansas, Town and gown, Local government, University of California, Davis  
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1358 clicks; posted to Business » on 28 Jun 2020 at 12:06 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-06-28 11:21:28 AM  
The Boston gig's been cancelled?
 
2020-06-28 11:31:07 AM  
Nothing of value lost
 
TWX [TotalFark]
2020-06-28 11:52:39 AM  
I don't agree with the assessment.

I've lived in Tempe, AZ off and on for many years.  When I first got to college and started spending time downtown and got to know the place as it was, then heard the discussion of people only a few years older and what they remembered of downtown, the two sounded nothing alike.  Many of the businesses they reminisced over weren't there anymore, and even many of the buildings and complexes themselves were different.

Over the years I've watched how the area has changed.  Businesses come and go, whole complexes face the wreckingball and get rebuilt, some shopping like Centerpoint have never really filled up ever.  There's always something changing downtown, and I have no doubt that businesses that fail will simply be replaced with new attempts at profitability in the area once the college's tens of thousands of students finally do return to on-campus learning and living.  Frankly I give it a year or two, and while the names will have changed, the business storefronts will be as full as they ever are again.

The captive-audience of the student body is what makes the area valuable, and is why businesses will continue to try to make it there, and since the school isn't going anywhere, it'll just mean everyone has to wait a bit.
 
2020-06-28 12:10:33 PM  
This can be said of any downtown/shopping area.  And the recovery can't even start until we have a better control on the spread of COVID-19.  Given that we're seeing a rise and some places are considering closing (either for the first time or again) because people are being farking idiots, it's going to be a while.
 
2020-06-28 12:16:37 PM  

TWX: I don't agree with the assessment.


I can't read NYT.  Is it talking about Tempe specifically?  I think of that as a Phoenix suburb, not a college town.

The only Pac-12 schools that I would call "college towns" are Eugene, Corvallis and Pullman.

And then there's the really small liberal arts college towns.  I'm not sure there are many of those in the West, but there are ton in the East. I'll guess I'll go Ivy League for the most recognizable example here, Dartmouth College in Hanover NH.
 
2020-06-28 12:19:00 PM  
In a census year too. Enjoy that lack of representation built on having out-of-town kids being there for the census you twats.

Prison towns need to lose their representation too.
 
2020-06-28 12:20:37 PM  
They say they don't link to sites with paywalls but then they keep linking to sites with paywalls.
 
2020-06-28 12:21:59 PM  

TWX: I don't agree with the assessment.

I've lived in Tempe, AZ off and on for many years.  When I first got to college and started spending time downtown and got to know the place as it was, then heard the discussion of people only a few years older and what they remembered of downtown, the two sounded nothing alike.  Many of the businesses they reminisced over weren't there anymore, and even many of the buildings and complexes themselves were different.

Over the years I've watched how the area has changed.  Businesses come and go, whole complexes face the wreckingball and get rebuilt, some shopping like Centerpoint have never really filled up ever.  There's always something changing downtown, and I have no doubt that businesses that fail will simply be replaced with new attempts at profitability in the area once the college's tens of thousands of students finally do return to on-campus learning and living.  Frankly I give it a year or two, and while the names will have changed, the business storefronts will be as full as they ever are again.

The captive-audience of the student body is what makes the area valuable, and is why businesses will continue to try to make it there, and since the school isn't going anywhere, it'll just mean everyone has to wait a bit.


School may not be going anywhere, but also foreign students will not be going anywhere either.
 
2020-06-28 12:23:19 PM  

12349876: TWX: I don't agree with the assessment.

I can't read NYT.  Is it talking about Tempe specifically?  I think of that as a Phoenix suburb, not a college town.

The only Pac-12 schools that I would call "college towns" are Eugene, Corvallis and Pullman.

And then there's the really small liberal arts college towns.  I'm not sure there are many of those in the West, but there are ton in the East. I'll guess I'll go Ivy League for the most recognizable example here, Dartmouth College in Hanover NH.


I think a lot of small colleges will not survive the coronavirus.
 
2020-06-28 12:33:28 PM  

Frank N Stein: Nothing of value lost


Seeing my Alma Mater in this article plus reading the stories of the loss of jobs on campus and the impact it'll have on the town, I can only say one thing to you

Fark you
 
2020-06-28 12:34:11 PM  
Single-industry towns have always been economically fragile.

Mining and logging ghost towns in the west.  Flint.  Coal towns in West Virginia.  Textile towns in New England 120 years ago, and the southeast in the last 30 years.
 
2020-06-28 12:34:23 PM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: 12349876: TWX: I don't agree with the assessment.

I can't read NYT.  Is it talking about Tempe specifically?  I think of that as a Phoenix suburb, not a college town.

The only Pac-12 schools that I would call "college towns" are Eugene, Corvallis and Pullman.

And then there's the really small liberal arts college towns.  I'm not sure there are many of those in the West, but there are ton in the East. I'll guess I'll go Ivy League for the most recognizable example here, Dartmouth College in Hanover NH.

I think a lot of small colleges will not survive the coronavirus.


A LOT of young Austinites work in the service industry. Ain't no service industry. Austin's independently owned bars and live music clubs were already struggling to survive. Abbott's farkery has pretty much guaranteed that 90% of them are going to close. They won't be replaced anytime soon. That scene is gone forever. Whatever takes their place won't be a bar or club... not for a while if ever. Those workers, owners and players will have to find another way to make a living. Eventually a new music scene will appear, but it won;t be many of the same people. If there is a recession or a depression, that may take a decade or longer. I know a lot of people here that are about to lose 15 years of work into their businesses. It's really sad, and it didn't have to happen.
 
2020-06-28 12:46:17 PM  

12349876: TWX: I don't agree with the assessment.

I can't read NYT.  Is it talking about Tempe specifically?  I think of that as a Phoenix suburb, not a college town.

The only Pac-12 schools that I would call "college towns" are Eugene, Corvallis and Pullman.

And then there's the really small liberal arts college towns.  I'm not sure there are many of those in the West, but there are ton in the East. I'll guess I'll go Ivy League for the most recognizable example here, Dartmouth College in Hanover NH.


The article begins with Davis, CA before branching into a series of anecdotes from a dozen other places.
 
2020-06-28 12:51:02 PM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: 12349876: TWX: I don't agree with the assessment.

I can't read NYT.  Is it talking about Tempe specifically?  I think of that as a Phoenix suburb, not a college town.

The only Pac-12 schools that I would call "college towns" are Eugene, Corvallis and Pullman.

And then there's the really small liberal arts college towns.  I'm not sure there are many of those in the West, but there are ton in the East. I'll guess I'll go Ivy League for the most recognizable example here, Dartmouth College in Hanover NH.

I think a lot of small colleges will not survive the coronavirus.


If their sales pitch is "We have a small, intimate environment, which is why we charge $25,000 a semester", and yet have to do distance learning, then yeah.
 
2020-06-28 12:56:48 PM  

FrancoFile: TedCruz'sCrazyDad: 12349876: TWX: I don't agree with the assessment.

I can't read NYT.  Is it talking about Tempe specifically?  I think of that as a Phoenix suburb, not a college town.

The only Pac-12 schools that I would call "college towns" are Eugene, Corvallis and Pullman.

And then there's the really small liberal arts college towns.  I'm not sure there are many of those in the West, but there are ton in the East. I'll guess I'll go Ivy League for the most recognizable example here, Dartmouth College in Hanover NH.

I think a lot of small colleges will not survive the coronavirus.

If their sales pitch is "We have a small, intimate environment, which is why we charge $25,000 a semester", and yet have to do distance learning, then yeah.


The value proposition of a UC stands up better - "learn from world-class researchers" isn't all THAT different on zoom vs. a 400-seat lecture hall, and I think actually makes it even easier to ask questions and get personal attention.
 
2020-06-28 12:59:45 PM  
I love college towns.  They're like little oases out here in bubbaville.
 
TWX [TotalFark]
2020-06-28 1:03:44 PM  

Enigmamf: FrancoFile: TedCruz'sCrazyDad: 12349876: TWX: I don't agree with the assessment.

I can't read NYT.  Is it talking about Tempe specifically?  I think of that as a Phoenix suburb, not a college town.

The only Pac-12 schools that I would call "college towns" are Eugene, Corvallis and Pullman.

And then there's the really small liberal arts college towns.  I'm not sure there are many of those in the West, but there are ton in the East. I'll guess I'll go Ivy League for the most recognizable example here, Dartmouth College in Hanover NH.

I think a lot of small colleges will not survive the coronavirus.

If their sales pitch is "We have a small, intimate environment, which is why we charge $25,000 a semester", and yet have to do distance learning, then yeah.

The value proposition of a UC stands up better - "learn from world-class researchers" isn't all THAT different on zoom vs. a 400-seat lecture hall, and I think actually makes it even easier to ask questions and get personal attention.


Theoretically professors and lecturers are supposed to host office-hours, when they're in their offices, basically available for consultation from the students, and they're supposed to be receptive to requests for assistance.

Obviously theory and reality rarely completely overlap.
 
2020-06-28 1:07:43 PM  
Do you know why college is so expensive?

Because Willie makes $40,000 per year to mop the floors of the science library, and Angela makes $62,000 a year to write reports on whether the school's internship program covers a geographically, industrially, and ethnically diverse set of businesses. Not to mention Bob who owns five bars on the main strip. And they all vote.

These college towns are centered around these gigantic patronage organizations, where local assemblymen are funneling student loan money into areas that have no other industry whatsoever. Do you think these people are foolish enough to tamper with the gravy train?

Prediction: State legislatures will begin requiring in-person classes at all public institutions, and then grant immunity (legal, not viral). Athens, Ohio has got to keep harvesting these middle-class kids to stay afloat!
 
2020-06-28 1:11:45 PM  

Aar1012: Frank N Stein: Nothing of value lost

Seeing my Alma Mater in this article plus reading the stories of the loss of jobs on campus and the impact it'll have on the town, I can only say one thing to you

Fark you


*clicks profile. Ohio State*

Thanks for proving my point.
 
2020-06-28 1:13:32 PM  

Aar1012: Frank N Stein: Nothing of value lost

Seeing my Alma Mater in this article plus reading the stories of the loss of jobs on campus and the impact it'll have on the town, I can only say one thing to you

Fark you


Do you still live there? If not your opinion doesn't count for shiat
 
2020-06-28 1:15:31 PM  

buttercat: I love college towns.  They're like little oases out here in bubbaville.


i think of them as being like the monastery in A Canticle for Liebowitz, a refuge for science in a wasteland of simpletons.
 
2020-06-28 1:16:42 PM  

Fabric_Man: Do you know why college is so expensive?

Because Willie makes $40,000 per year to mop the floors of the science library, and Angela makes $62,000 a year to write reports on whether the school's internship program covers a geographically, industrially, and ethnically diverse set of businesses. Not to mention Bob who owns five bars on the main strip. And they all vote.

These college towns are centered around these gigantic patronage organizations, where local assemblymen are funneling student loan money into areas that have no other industry whatsoever. Do you think these people are foolish enough to tamper with the gravy train?

Prediction: State legislatures will begin requiring in-person classes at all public institutions, and then grant immunity (legal, not viral). Athens, Ohio has got to keep harvesting these middle-class kids to stay afloat!


Yeah, it's definitely all the over paid janitors that are causing the costs of a college education to sky rocket.
 
2020-06-28 1:23:23 PM  

Fabric_Man: Do you know why college is so expensive?


Willie may make 40k, but he is mopping the entire campus, not just the science library.  Angela is a statistician.  She makes way more than $62,000 a year, and that report on the school's internship program is one of a dozen such reports she has to generate every week.

College is expensive because critical thinkers like to pay a living wage.  The costs will be much more manageable when we start taxing wealth.
 
2020-06-28 1:26:43 PM  

Fabric_Man: Do you know why college is so expensive?

Because Willie makes $40,000 per year to mop the floors of the science library, and Angela makes $62,000 a year to write reports on whether the school's internship program covers a geographically, industrially, and ethnically diverse set of businesses. Not to mention Bob who owns five bars on the main strip. And they all vote.

These college towns are centered around these gigantic patronage organizations, where local assemblymen are funneling student loan money into areas that have no other industry whatsoever. Do you think these people are foolish enough to tamper with the gravy train?

Prediction: State legislatures will begin requiring in-person classes at all public institutions, and then grant immunity (legal, not viral). Athens, Ohio has got to keep harvesting these middle-class kids to stay afloat!


It's depressing that you think $40K and $62K are too much for those positions. You must be old. Thanks to inflation, it's below the poverty line. That's actually on the low side for those positions in any institution of repute. Those persons have to be able to be around youths and have usually possess no criminal record. Good luck finding a janitor at minimum wage that shows up and doesn't rob you blind.
 
2020-06-28 1:26:56 PM  

FrancoFile: Single-industry towns have always been economically fragile.

Mining and logging ghost towns in the west.  Flint.  Coal towns in West Virginia.  Textile towns in New England 120 years ago, and the southeast in the last 30 years.


Yet the folks there refuse to move, yet consistently cast votes for people who say they will resurrect those jobs from the dead like Jesus resurrected Lazarus. It's like they deliberately vote against their best interests!

Some of y'all, like my dad, moved away from small towns to seek our a better way of life. But some didn't, and more importantly, some couldn't. We could tell then to fark off, because they seem to choose to suffer. But that ain't fair. They are who they are. They deserve our compassion!

This virus can, and will crush some towns for good. It's sad, because I got my undergrad in a small, college town. But what can you do? Those folks are impossible to retrain. They don't wanna work, or if they do, it's usually something fun and fulfilling, like repairing motorcycles, or working in a fish and tackle shop. They refuse to take jobs picking fruits and vegetables, or working in slaughterhouses. They don't even wanna unload freight, or handle packages for Amazon!

They are selfish, stupid, lazy and sluggish. They don't want to do any better. They would rather die with their towns, instead of moving, or taking less desirable jobs. We should just go ahead and write them off.

And if you thought that rant was bad, wait till you hear what they say about black people.
 
2020-06-28 1:32:33 PM  

Fabric_Man: Do you know why college is so expensive?

Because Willie makes $40,000 per year to mop the floors of the science library, and Angela makes $62,000 a year to write reports on whether the school's internship program covers a geographically, industrially, and ethnically diverse set of businesses. Not to mention Bob who owns five bars on the main strip. And they all vote.

These college towns are centered around these gigantic patronage organizations, where local assemblymen are funneling student loan money into areas that have no other industry whatsoever. Do you think these people are foolish enough to tamper with the gravy train?

Prediction: State legislatures will begin requiring in-person classes at all public institutions, and then grant immunity (legal, not viral). Athens, Ohio has got to keep harvesting these middle-class kids to stay afloat!


Wow. You really have your finger on the pulse on what being paid a lot means and how universities work. I'm going to start listening to you instead of throwing alphabet soup at the wall and hoping it makes words.
 
2020-06-28 1:57:33 PM  

Psychopompous: buttercat: I love college towns.  They're like little oases out here in bubbaville.

i think of them as being like the monastery in A Canticle for Liebowitz, a refuge for science in a wasteland of simpletons.


I read that book a long time ago.  I should probably read it again.
 
2020-06-28 1:57:48 PM  
Wouldn't it just be God's punishment to make State College a hellhole for allowing Jerry Sandusky's tenure?
 
2020-06-28 2:00:30 PM  
Oh, and I graduated from one of Fark's favorite schools.  Things are getting ugly in College Station, and not just the economy.  Alumni and students are clashing over the statute of Lawrence Sullivan Ross.

/ team Sully needs to go to a museum
 
2020-06-28 2:04:20 PM  
*statue*

damn and blast
:)
 
2020-06-28 2:16:47 PM  

BlackChickWhiteAccent: FrancoFile: Single-industry towns have always been economically fragile.

Mining and logging ghost towns in the west.  Flint.  Coal towns in West Virginia.  Textile towns in New England 120 years ago, and the southeast in the last 30 years.

Yet the folks there refuse to move, yet consistently cast votes for people who say they will resurrect those jobs from the dead like Jesus resurrected Lazarus. It's like they deliberately vote against their best interests!

Some of y'all, like my dad, moved away from small towns to seek our a better way of life. But some didn't, and more importantly, some couldn't. We could tell then to fark off, because they seem to choose to suffer. But that ain't fair. They are who they are. They deserve our compassion!

This virus can, and will crush some towns for good. It's sad, because I got my undergrad in a small, college town. But what can you do? Those folks are impossible to retrain. They don't wanna work, or if they do, it's usually something fun and fulfilling, like repairing motorcycles, or working in a fish and tackle shop. They refuse to take jobs picking fruits and vegetables, or working in slaughterhouses. They don't even wanna unload freight, or handle packages for Amazon!

They are selfish, stupid, lazy and sluggish. They don't want to do any better. They would rather die with their towns, instead of moving, or taking less desirable jobs. We should just go ahead and write them off.

And if you thought that rant was bad, wait till you hear what they say about black people.


What to blow up a simple economic observation into a don't-blame-the-victims screed.
 
2020-06-28 2:20:31 PM  
The Spanish Flu epidemic ran two years, 1918-1920.  Then, even with the Prohibition era, the country returned to a roaring start.  January, 2022 is a good time to expect some kind of return to normalcy.
 
2020-06-28 2:42:04 PM  

buttercat: Psychopompous: buttercat: I love college towns.  They're like little oases out here in bubbaville.

i think of them as being like the monastery in A Canticle for Liebowitz, a refuge for science in a wasteland of simpletons.

I read that book a long time ago.  I should probably read it again.


Dude, we are so living in a A Canticle for Liebowitz prequel. After a nuclear apocalypse, the survivors take out their revenge on any scientists or teachers they can find, except for the few who find sanctuary in monasteries and become monks/crypto-scientists, spending centuries hand copying any scraps of knowledge that survived the Burning, in the hope that civilization will evolve to the point where their knowledge is appreciated. The ignoramuses who witchhunt the scientists refer to themselves as "Simpletons" as in "good simple folk" The comparison between "simpletons" and "deplorables" is hard to avoid.
 
2020-06-28 3:04:55 PM  
But don't you dare mess with football. Oh wait.
 
2020-06-28 3:13:55 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-06-28 3:14:53 PM  

Kornchex: Fabric_Man: Do you know why college is so expensive?

Willie may make 40k, but he is mopping the entire campus, not just the science library.  Angela is a statistician.  She makes way more than $62,000 a year, and that report on the school's internship program is one of a dozen such reports she has to generate every week.

College is expensive because critical thinkers like to pay a living wage.  The costs will be much more manageable when we start taxing wealth.


Well, there IS a bloated administration at most schools, so he's not TOO far off.
 
2020-06-28 3:16:15 PM  

AngryDragon: [Fark user image 550x413]


I love how right-wingers are more than happy to tell us who they are in their usernames.

Yes, we know, you dislike education because smart people make you feel bad with their big words and left-leaning attitudes.
 
2020-06-28 4:04:13 PM  
LOL at Davis. Maybe if you hadn't tried so hard to be "Little Berkeley" and let the soccer moms and nimbys drive out all the blue collar jobs (Hunt's specifically) you wouldn't be screwed now. The whole town is now built on real estate equity and UCD, with a bunch of upper middle class commuter nitwits concentrating there so their precious snowflakes won't have to interact with a non Asian brown person until freshman year of college.
 
2020-06-28 4:17:28 PM  

Fabric_Man: Do you know why college is so expensive?

Because Willie makes $40,000 per year to mop the floors of the science library, and Angela makes $62,000 a year to write reports on whether the school's internship program covers a geographically, industrially, and ethnically diverse set of businesses. Not to mention Bob who owns five bars on the main strip. And they all vote.

These college towns are centered around these gigantic patronage organizations, where local assemblymen are funneling student loan money into areas that have no other industry whatsoever. Do you think these people are foolish enough to tamper with the gravy train?

Prediction: State legislatures will begin requiring in-person classes at all public institutions, and then grant immunity (legal, not viral). Athens, Ohio has got to keep harvesting these middle-class kids to stay afloat!


Bowling Green (the Ohio one) has the same two people own 90% of the bars near campus.

So yeah, they'll be massacred by the lack of students going out to drink.
 
2020-06-28 4:48:58 PM  
College towns are the herpes of settlements.

They might fade into remission, but they never go away.
 
2020-06-28 5:21:35 PM  

Surrender your boo-tah: AngryDragon: [Fark user image 550x413]

I love how right-wingers are more than happy to tell us who they are in their usernames.

Yes, we know, you dislike education because smart people make you feel bad with their big words and left-leaning attitudes.


I have a masters degree and an executive position in a large corporation.  My issue isn't with education.  My issue is with the culture around college towns.

And if you woke liberals realized that the price and culture around a college town is directly driving the student loan crisis that you also supposedly rail against, you would too.
 
2020-06-28 6:18:46 PM  

Enigmamf: FrancoFile: TedCruz'sCrazyDad: 12349876: TWX: I don't agree with the assessment.

I can't read NYT.  Is it talking about Tempe specifically?  I think of that as a Phoenix suburb, not a college town.

The only Pac-12 schools that I would call "college towns" are Eugene, Corvallis and Pullman.

And then there's the really small liberal arts college towns.  I'm not sure there are many of those in the West, but there are ton in the East. I'll guess I'll go Ivy League for the most recognizable example here, Dartmouth College in Hanover NH.

I think a lot of small colleges will not survive the coronavirus.

If their sales pitch is "We have a small, intimate environment, which is why we charge $25,000 a semester", and yet have to do distance learning, then yeah.

The value proposition of a UC stands up better - "learn from world-class researchers" isn't all THAT different on zoom vs. a 400-seat lecture hall, and I think actually makes it even easier to ask questions and get personal attention.


None of it is justifiable. The American system is completely broken, and it took a worldwide pandemic for some to realize it. And the fact that even entry-level jobs require some kind of paper from one of these over-priced diploma mills is insane
 
2020-06-28 6:22:03 PM  

TWX: Enigmamf: FrancoFile: TedCruz'sCrazyDad: 12349876: TWX: I don't agree with the assessment.

I can't read NYT.  Is it talking about Tempe specifically?  I think of that as a Phoenix suburb, not a college town.

The only Pac-12 schools that I would call "college towns" are Eugene, Corvallis and Pullman.

And then there's the really small liberal arts college towns.  I'm not sure there are many of those in the West, but there are ton in the East. I'll guess I'll go Ivy League for the most recognizable example here, Dartmouth College in Hanover NH.

I think a lot of small colleges will not survive the coronavirus.

If their sales pitch is "We have a small, intimate environment, which is why we charge $25,000 a semester", and yet have to do distance learning, then yeah.

The value proposition of a UC stands up better - "learn from world-class researchers" isn't all THAT different on zoom vs. a 400-seat lecture hall, and I think actually makes it even easier to ask questions and get personal attention.

Theoretically professors and lecturers are supposed to host office-hours, when they're in their offices, basically available for consultation from the students, and they're supposed to be receptive to requests for assistance.

Obviously theory and reality rarely completely overlap.


Some professors are impossible to track down. I tried to get ahold of a guy for an entire semester once, and he kept saying that he was way too busy with his course load and research. Around the end of that semester I'm sitting with a buddy and he says "You know I'm Facebook friends with XYZ professor. You should see this, man. He's in the studio with Kendrick Lamar." That would put him on an entirely different continent. Holding a cigar that probably wasn't a cigar.
 
2020-06-28 6:41:14 PM  

germ78: In a census year too. Enjoy that lack of representation built on having out-of-town kids being there for the census you twats.

Prison towns need to lose their representation too.


The university in the town where I live has been telling students that they are to fill out the census using the town/city they normally spend the most time in as their place of residence. That would of course be here, not at their parents' homes.
 
2020-06-28 8:45:37 PM  

Frank N Stein: Aar1012: Frank N Stein: Nothing of value lost

Seeing my Alma Mater in this article plus reading the stories of the loss of jobs on campus and the impact it'll have on the town, I can only say one thing to you

Fark you

*clicks profile. Ohio State*

Thanks for proving my point.


I didn't go to Ohio State. Try again.
 
2020-06-28 8:54:08 PM  
Think of all the cheap land realtors will buy up, and flip for profit!

/DNRTFA
 
2020-06-28 8:55:13 PM  
Good, higher education has ruined this planet
 
2020-06-28 8:55:46 PM  

TWX: I don't agree with the assessment.

I've lived in Tempe, AZ off and on for many years.  When I first got to college and started spending time downtown and got to know the place as it was, then heard the discussion of people only a few years older and what they remembered of downtown, the two sounded nothing alike.  Many of the businesses they reminisced over weren't there anymore, and even many of the buildings and complexes themselves were different.

Over the years I've watched how the area has changed.  Businesses come and go, whole complexes face the wreckingball and get rebuilt, some shopping like Centerpoint have never really filled up ever.  There's always something changing downtown, and I have no doubt that businesses that fail will simply be replaced with new attempts at profitability in the area once the college's tens of thousands of students finally do return to on-campus learning and living.  Frankly I give it a year or two, and while the names will have changed, the business storefronts will be as full as they ever are again.

The captive-audience of the student body is what makes the area valuable, and is why businesses will continue to try to make it there, and since the school isn't going anywhere, it'll just mean everyone has to wait a bit.


No offense, but Tempe is a bad example of a college town. Tempe is a suburb of Phoenix and although losing Arizone would be bad for it there arw millions of people surrounding it.

Look across the midwest and you will  find actual college towns like Carbondale IL home to Southern Illinois University.

Carbondale's population is around 25K it is easily the biggest size town for 50 miles in all directions.

The university has been shrinking from around 20K to 10K over the past twenty years and now COVID might be the final nail in is coffin for SIU and Carbondale.
 
2020-06-28 9:20:22 PM  

HighOnCraic: The Boston gig's been cancelled?


Tom Scholz hurt his back again.
 
2020-06-28 9:29:54 PM  

Aar1012: Frank N Stein: Aar1012: Frank N Stein: Nothing of value lost

Seeing my Alma Mater in this article plus reading the stories of the loss of jobs on campus and the impact it'll have on the town, I can only say one thing to you

Fark you

*clicks profile. Ohio State*

Thanks for proving my point.

I didn't go to Ohio State. Try again.


Go Bobcats.
/Fellow Alum
//Miss Athens every day
///3s
 
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