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(South China Morning Post)   Frugal Indian cooks rediscover vegetable peel and fruit rinds during lockdown, ingredients they had ignored when mom and grandma cooked. "A lot of us took abundance and availability of fresh produce, packaged food and exotic ingredients for granted"   (scmp.com) divider line
    More: Unlikely, Cooking, Frugal Indian cooks, frugal cooking, vegetable peel, fruit rinds, India, Indian housewives, food supplies  
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423 clicks; posted to Food » on 27 Jun 2020 at 5:50 AM (12 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-06-27 8:33:26 AM  
6 votes:
"A lot of us took abundance and availability of fresh produce, packaged food and exotic ingredients for granted"

...you think?!

Welcome to growing up poor, folks, where the idea of a fresh vegetable was a treat and a salad with dinner meant that you "made it." My wife & I both grew up poor. It's hard sometimes to relate to friends & co-workers, who've seemingly never had to experience real hunger, or had to figure out how to eat what was at hand.

Orange peel used to be a treat - we used to get it from the Big Apple when we were little kids living in Webster, MA - because you could make marmalade from it. Sugar, water, and orange peel was all it took, and we could make tons of it from relatively little orange peel.
 
2020-06-27 9:01:50 PM  
3 votes:
Going to McDonald's was normally outside of our family budget. Now, our family eats out every week. I'm not sure our kids even think it's special.

I didn't taste an avocado until I was 18 or a mango until I was 23. Neither were sold anywhere near where we lived.

Growing up, the local stores stocked tangerines only at Christmas. I still associate tangerines with Christmas. My kids never understood why they got a tangerine for Christmas every year when the markets here are piled with fruits from all over the nation and from around the world all year long. Now, I can't find tangerines at all. The markets stock piles of clementines with names like "Lil' Cuties," but the squashed ball looking tangerines are nowhere to be found.

I also remember government cheese and butter. We kids normally didn't wait in the lines. We whined and carried on so much, our mothers would leave us at home, responsible for watching one another. We normally couldn't afford real butter. So, when our parents got home, thrilled to have real butter, would spread it thin on a few crackers just to relish it. We kids, however, complained that it "didn't taste right" because we were accustomed to the cheapest margarine.

We had a very large garden and ate greens every day. We rotated: collards, turnips, cabbage, collards, turnips, cabbage. We got broccoli once or twice a year. Even my S.O. can't understand the concept of broccoli as a huge treat.

Another treat we loved was squash blossoms. Once a year, when the squash plants had stopped producing, our mothers picked the blossoms, gently flattened them, battered them, and fried them in a lightly greased pan. Every couple of years, the local market has squash blossoms and I try to make them. The girl-child is the only one who likes them. The S.O. declared them weird without so much as a bite and my son can't tolerate them.

I think the saddest part of how we live now is how many things people no longer enjoy.
 
2020-06-27 6:08:39 PM  
3 votes:
We freeze:
-onion, garlic, chive, & leek peels/stalks for marinades & veg stock;
-leftover lettuces, greens, & root veg scraps for veg stock;
-over ripe bananas, plantains & pawpaws for desserts & breads;
-stale bread for bread pudd'n.

Fruit skins, esp citrus, get added to liquors for marinades & sauces.

The rest goes to red worms in the composting bed.
 
2020-06-27 10:00:10 AM  
3 votes:

FormlessOne: I should probably clarify - the Big Apple was a farmer's market near where we lived. They put out useable fruit & vegetable waste, everything from stuff that they couldn't sell to things like lemon & orange peel, for the poor - think "food bank," but privately and quietly run to try & keep some of our friggin' dignity intact.


Years ago, getting Gub-mint yellow cheese from friends who weren't nearly as poor as I was, was a big deal. I was livin' large.

CSB: What really grinds my gears is when on Chopped, chefs get snotty with (perceived) low grade food. Really? F 'em.
 
2020-06-27 10:05:00 AM  
2 votes:

Artist: FormlessOne: I should probably clarify - the Big Apple was a farmer's market near where we lived. They put out useable fruit & vegetable waste, everything from stuff that they couldn't sell to things like lemon & orange peel, for the poor - think "food bank," but privately and quietly run to try & keep some of our friggin' dignity intact.

Years ago, getting Gub-mint yellow cheese from friends who weren't nearly as poor as I was, was a big deal. I was livin' large.

CSB: What really grinds my gears is when on Chopped, chefs get snotty with (perceived) low grade food. Really? F 'em.


...right?!

Culinary skill meant elevating foodstuffs. "Look, I slathered a piece of toast with foie gras - I AM A GOD!" isn't cooking.

About the only cooking show I can tolerate these days is The Great British Bake Off, now that original AB's off the air (I check out the recycled stuff he's put out lately, but it's just not the same.) Shows like Chopped and MasterChef are a farking waste of time to me.
 
2020-06-27 8:36:12 AM  
2 votes:
I should probably clarify - the Big Apple was a farmer's market near where we lived. They put out useable fruit & vegetable waste, everything from stuff that they couldn't sell to things like lemon & orange peel, for the poor - think "food bank," but privately and quietly run to try & keep some of our friggin' dignity intact.
 
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