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2135 clicks; posted to Food » and Business » on 27 Jun 2020 at 1:53 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-06-26 8:12:10 PM  
10 votes:
I'm totally okay with that.
 
2020-06-26 10:22:26 PM  
6 votes:
thumbs.gfycat.comView Full Size
 
2020-06-27 9:56:11 AM  
3 votes:
Smart idea, except for the customers were not social-distanced and the robot was not cleaned between customers.
 
2020-06-27 1:53:26 PM  
2 votes:
Not sure what the point of having 6 robots per server is when you have an aisleway that's only wide enough for one. Seems like you could get by with one per aisle.

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It's just the robot version of a sushi belt.
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2020-06-27 5:27:51 AM  
2 votes:

starlost: that was a huge portion of food. and i'm a fat american who only went to buffets before covid.


its a serving for two, the guy puts it in the middle of the table.


About the tech:
I wrote about that in sci fi thirty years ago.

The thing was we had robotics, but not robots per se. So instead of some robot waiter with a tuxedo painted on his chest, "an automated tray slid down the counter and stopped right in front of him, delivering the lunch he had ordered through thought-mail moments ago."

now we just need the wetware.
 
2020-06-27 3:21:44 AM  
2 votes:
that was a huge portion of food. and i'm a fat american who only went to buffets before covid.
 
2020-06-27 2:29:54 AM  
2 votes:

TWX: Something along these lines might be a component.

I could see the kitchen having labeled slots on the ready-line, where a given table's order might be cued.  When the order is ready for service, the cook notes the order and the robot then cross-references the order to the table, retrieves it without requiring a human to load it (so probably standardized plates or a system configured to understand the restaurant's plate sizes) where it then roams the open floor of the restaurant instead of a special track.  The robot could be basically a hollow tube that can lower the food down within like the tiers of those automated parking garages, allowing a narrow footprint for an entire table's order.

On arrival, the robot would start offloading after confirming the edge of the table is clear, and the patrons would initially have to hand around plates.  A more complicated system to deploy the plates could be created but confirming a kitchen-prepared plate to a patron-seat might be a bit much initially.

Most likely restaurants would still want to have a human hostess and the manager would probably still walk around asking diners how their meals are, and bussing staff would probably still be necessary for cleaning at least initially.

Now, where this could really shine is if it turns out that we're stuck with SARS-CoV-2 and its ilk for a long time, and restaurants have to switch to an alcove-type dining experience, where there's a greater degree of separation and privacy.  Automated serving robots might further allow for isolation to reduce the spread.


Pfff. Too complicated. Too many parts. We already have the perfect technology, it's called the pneumatic tube.
 
2020-06-27 6:26:25 AM  
1 vote:

TWX: Something along these lines might be a component.

I could see the kitchen having labeled slots on the ready-line, where a given table's order might be cued.  When the order is ready for service, the cook notes the order and the robot then cross-references the order to the table, retrieves it without requiring a human to load it (so probably standardized plates or a system configured to understand the restaurant's plate sizes) where it then roams the open floor of the restaurant instead of a special track.  The robot could be basically a hollow tube that can lower the food down within like the tiers of those automated parking garages, allowing a narrow footprint for an entire table's order.

On arrival, the robot would start offloading after confirming the edge of the table is clear, and the patrons would initially have to hand around plates.  A more complicated system to deploy the plates could be created but confirming a kitchen-prepared plate to a patron-seat might be a bit much initially.

Most likely restaurants would still want to have a human hostess and the manager would probably still walk around asking diners how their meals are, and bussing staff would probably still be necessary for cleaning at least initially.

Now, where this could really shine is if it turns out that we're stuck with SARS-CoV-2 and its ilk for a long time, and restaurants have to switch to an alcove-type dining experience, where there's a greater degree of separation and privacy.  Automated serving robots might further allow for isolation to reduce the spread.


I read on rocketnews a couple months ago, that kaitenzushi places in Japan were shutting off their conveyor belts simply due to the excess amount of human contact/interaction.

it seems now they are trying out exactly that alcove situation - and the kaitens are, well, ...kaitening... again, but individual custom orders from the tabletop pad only, no more "also a bunch of random popular stuff rolling around" - so I think it might work as an acceptable (and pre existing proven tech) alternative to the robutts. but you know Japan, JAPAN GOTTA ROBOT.

https://twitter.com/TakaYama_Web3/sta​t​us/1268134507841912832

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TWX [TotalFark]
2020-06-26 11:39:34 PM  
1 vote:
Something along these lines might be a component.

I could see the kitchen having labeled slots on the ready-line, where a given table's order might be cued.  When the order is ready for service, the cook notes the order and the robot then cross-references the order to the table, retrieves it without requiring a human to load it (so probably standardized plates or a system configured to understand the restaurant's plate sizes) where it then roams the open floor of the restaurant instead of a special track.  The robot could be basically a hollow tube that can lower the food down within like the tiers of those automated parking garages, allowing a narrow footprint for an entire table's order.

On arrival, the robot would start offloading after confirming the edge of the table is clear, and the patrons would initially have to hand around plates.  A more complicated system to deploy the plates could be created but confirming a kitchen-prepared plate to a patron-seat might be a bit much initially.

Most likely restaurants would still want to have a human hostess and the manager would probably still walk around asking diners how their meals are, and bussing staff would probably still be necessary for cleaning at least initially.

Now, where this could really shine is if it turns out that we're stuck with SARS-CoV-2 and its ilk for a long time, and restaurants have to switch to an alcove-type dining experience, where there's a greater degree of separation and privacy.  Automated serving robots might further allow for isolation to reduce the spread.
 
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