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(Daily Mail)   Two super earths discovered 11 light years away. It's good to have a couple of spares   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line
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716 clicks; posted to Geek » on 26 Jun 2020 at 11:46 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-06-26 11:26:17 AM  
8 votes:
11 light years....like it's just across the street

The fastest space probe we have took 9 years to get to Pluto.

Maybe in 500,000 years we'll have the technology to visit star systems but it's almost a certainty we'll destroy ourselves long before then.
 
2020-06-26 12:07:32 PM  
2 votes:

Circusdog320: 11 light years....like it's just across the street

The fastest space probe we have took 9 years to get to Pluto.

Maybe in 500,000 years we'll have the technology to visit star systems but it's almost a certainty we'll destroy ourselves long before then.


We have the technology to produce a fast-flyby probe of that system, such that we could have a probe examine the system in about 110 to 140 years, and we'd get the results back sometime between 121 years and 151 years-ish.

It would be expensive, yes, and require a long-term commitment to a mission that would span the working lifetime of roughly 3 to 4 generations of workers, but technologically it's within our grasp.

Though a more realistic target is Proxima Centauri or the Alpha Centauri system, since you could get usable data back within just a couple decades of launch, and you could have detailed data returned within 50 years of launch.  We know how to make machines that last that long.   Voyagers 1 and 2, and Pioneer 10 and 11, are and were limited not by equipment failure but by available power.  We could power an interstellar probe for most of the coast phase to Alpha or Proxima Centauri with conventional Plutonium fueled RTGs and then activate a dormant nuclear reactor to provide the gobs of power needed during the flyby.

For a longer term mission we could use Americium fueled RTGs for the coast phase.

How could we do this in such a short time?

i.gifer.comView Full Size



Nuclear Pulse Propulsion:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear​_​pulse_propulsion

It was perfectly feasible as a propulsion method using 1960's technology and materials.  It would probably be more efficient today with modern materials science.

Unfortunately, it's banned by the 1963 Partial Nuclear Test Ban Treaty.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Partial​_​Nuclear_Test_Ban_Treaty
 
2020-06-26 11:09:36 AM  
2 votes:
Earth First - we'll strip mine the other planet later!
 
2020-06-26 2:22:17 PM  
1 vote:

urger: some_beer_drinker: Circusdog320: 11 light years....like it's just across the street

The fastest space probe we have took 9 years to get to Pluto.

Maybe in 500,000 years we'll have the technology to visit star systems but it's almost a certainty we'll destroy ourselves long before then.

we have the technology now. we mastered gravitational drives in the 50's.

study it out. you think aliens are coming here? well, they are, and we back engineered lots of their stuff. some of the ufo's people see are ours. some are not.

Some are streetlights


about 80% are streetlights. the rest are not.
 
2020-06-26 11:48:16 AM  
1 vote:
Can we go now please?
 
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