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(Consequence of Sound)   At least one act has nope'd out of the Herd Immunity Fest once they heard it was called "Herd Immunity Fest." Amazingly the promoters got the hint and dropped the name   (consequenceofsound.net) divider line
    More: Followup, Festival, band Nonpoint, Smallpox, Eventing, The Bill, The Band, Spider One, The Lineup  
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4829 clicks; posted to Politics » and Entertainment » on 25 Jun 2020 at 4:31 AM (18 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-06-25 4:40:53 AM  
How american. These people need to be curdstomped. What kind of muensters would set something like this up just for some cheddar. Limburger
 
2020-06-25 4:45:09 AM  
Now renamed "Darwin Rocks!"
 
2020-06-25 4:47:58 AM  
Who?.jpg
 
2020-06-25 4:53:17 AM  
This is probably a stupid question, but as far as I know you can contract Covid more than once.
Doesn't the concept of herd immunity fall apart in this scenario; whereas for something like smallpox it does work because it's a one-and-done disease?
 
2020-06-25 4:59:14 AM  

Ostman: This is probably a stupid question, but as far as I know you can contract Covid more than once.
Doesn't the concept of herd immunity fall apart in this scenario; whereas for something like smallpox it does work because it's a one-and-done disease?


Latest stuff I've seen says 2 months.  That is bad news.
 
2020-06-25 5:07:25 AM  

haknudsen: Ostman: This is probably a stupid question, but as far as I know you can contract Covid more than once.
Doesn't the concept of herd immunity fall apart in this scenario; whereas for something like smallpox it does work because it's a one-and-done disease?

Latest stuff I've seen says 2 months.  That is bad news.


The concept of herd immunity falls apart without a vaccine. There is no disease in which herd immunity exists because of natural immunity.
 
2020-06-25 5:09:24 AM  

Ostman: This is probably a stupid question, but as far as I know you can contract Covid more than once.
Doesn't the concept of herd immunity fall apart in this scenario; whereas for something like smallpox it does work because it's a one-and-done disease?


Not a stupid question. It's not an all or nothing equation though. Usually limited exposure to a virus allows most healthy immune systems to begin building some level of resistance to said virus. Not sure sharing a public concert venue with 2000 strangers for three days qualifies as limited exposure though.

There seems to be a good chance a high percentage of the population will eventually be exposed to this virus. Doing what can be done to strengthen your own immune system is important.
 
2020-06-25 5:10:02 AM  

Maturin: haknudsen: Ostman: This is probably a stupid question, but as far as I know you can contract Covid more than once.
Doesn't the concept of herd immunity fall apart in this scenario; whereas for something like smallpox it does work because it's a one-and-done disease?

Latest stuff I've seen says 2 months.  That is bad news.

The concept of herd immunity falls apart without a vaccine. There is no disease in which herd immunity exists because of natural immunity.


Chicken pox, after you've had it once. (Not everyone gets shingles later).
 
2020-06-25 5:10:15 AM  
I've never heard of any of these bands. And I think I feel good about that.
 
2020-06-25 5:11:21 AM  

KodosZardoz: I've never heard of any of these bands. And I think I feel good about that.


Why would any of them still be considering this given the promoters being jerks?
 
2020-06-25 5:16:32 AM  

haknudsen: Ostman: This is probably a stupid question, but as far as I know you can contract Covid more than once.
Doesn't the concept of herd immunity fall apart in this scenario; whereas for something like smallpox it does work because it's a one-and-done disease?

Latest stuff I've seen says 2 months.  That is bad news.


That study wasn't peer reviewed and it only covered 37 people. Another larger study had the opposite results that immunity is still present months later. Either way still need a vaccine for it to actually be effective herd immunity.
 
2020-06-25 5:26:41 AM  
I must have missed the first thread but am curious about the ratio of Wisconsin Death Trip puns to other comments.
 
2020-06-25 5:28:28 AM  

Sid Deuces: Ostman: This is probably a stupid question, but as far as I know you can contract Covid more than once.
Doesn't the concept of herd immunity fall apart in this scenario; whereas for something like smallpox it does work because it's a one-and-done disease?

Not a stupid question. It's not an all or nothing equation though. Usually limited exposure to a virus allows most healthy immune systems to begin building some level of resistance to said virus. Not sure sharing a public concert venue with 2000 strangers for three days qualifies as limited exposure though.

There seems to be a good chance a high percentage of the population will eventually be exposed to this virus. Doing what can be done to strengthen your own immune system is important.


Sensitivity, not strength is the way to go. Being able to more quickly produce antibodies early on is the real winner. Even a day or two will give you a chance to kill it before it makes it to the lungs.

Too bad we never did many studies on such a topic.
 
2020-06-25 5:35:21 AM  

Stibium: Sid Deuces: Ostman: This is probably a stupid question, but as far as I know you can contract Covid more than once.
Doesn't the concept of herd immunity fall apart in this scenario; whereas for something like smallpox it does work because it's a one-and-done disease?

Not a stupid question. It's not an all or nothing equation though. Usually limited exposure to a virus allows most healthy immune systems to begin building some level of resistance to said virus. Not sure sharing a public concert venue with 2000 strangers for three days qualifies as limited exposure though.

There seems to be a good chance a high percentage of the population will eventually be exposed to this virus. Doing what can be done to strengthen your own immune system is important.

Sensitivity, not strength is the way to go. Being able to more quickly produce antibodies early on is the real winner. Even a day or two will give you a chance to kill it before it makes it to the lungs.

Too bad we never did many studies on such a topic.


Well, I mean, SARS and MERS were scary and there were plenty of researchers wanting to counteract them but they only hit a couple thousand over in Asia so who knew only years later we'd face another similar respiratory disease where that research would've been useful?  The pharma companies needed to make money now.
 
2020-06-25 5:36:19 AM  
A better name would be "The Herd Experiment Concert."
 
2020-06-25 5:38:30 AM  
"The Polio Pajama Party."
 
2020-06-25 5:46:24 AM  

Summoner101: Well, I mean, SARS and MERS were scary and there were plenty of researchers wanting to counteract them but they only hit a couple thousand over in Asia so who knew only years later we'd face another similar respiratory disease where that research would've been useful?  The pharma companies needed to make money now.


.. .A vaccine for SARS was almost completed, then wasn't needed anymore. They *were* researching it. It kind of takes time to develop something like that, and by the time they were close to ready, the threat had passed.
 
2020-06-25 5:47:52 AM  

Maturin: haknudsen: Ostman: This is probably a stupid question, but as far as I know you can contract Covid more than once.
Doesn't the concept of herd immunity fall apart in this scenario; whereas for something like smallpox it does work because it's a one-and-done disease?

Latest stuff I've seen says 2 months.  That is bad news.

The concept of herd immunity falls apart without a vaccine. There is no disease in which herd immunity exists because of natural immunity.


Well yes, but that's survivorship bias. Plenty of novel pathogens have burned out once their host populations developed herd immunity. We just don't have them any more.

(Or, like the Black Death, they would come in waves, then burn out due to herd immunity, then come roaring back a generation later once that herd immunity subsided with the birth of a large number of new and non-immune children)

There's no guarantee that natural herd immunity will make covid-19 go away, but there's no guarantee it won't, either. Right now we're still in "who knows" territory.
 
2020-06-25 5:52:07 AM  
So, they are saying they were... Misled?
 
2020-06-25 5:55:58 AM  

Felgraf: Summoner101: Well, I mean, SARS and MERS were scary and there were plenty of researchers wanting to counteract them but they only hit a couple thousand over in Asia so who knew only years later we'd face another similar respiratory disease where that research would've been useful?  The pharma companies needed to make money now.

.. .A vaccine for SARS was almost completed, then wasn't needed anymore. They *were* researching it. It kind of takes time to develop something like that, and by the time they were close to ready, the threat had passed.


Right, and because there was no profit incentive any longer they never finished it.  Might've been helpful.
 
2020-06-25 6:06:17 AM  

Bennie Crabtree: Maturin: haknudsen: Ostman: This is probably a stupid question, but as far as I know you can contract Covid more than once.
Doesn't the concept of herd immunity fall apart in this scenario; whereas for something like smallpox it does work because it's a one-and-done disease?

Latest stuff I've seen says 2 months.  That is bad news.

The concept of herd immunity falls apart without a vaccine. There is no disease in which herd immunity exists because of natural immunity.

Chicken pox, after you've had it once. (Not everyone gets shingles later).


We have a vaccine for that now. But even when I was a kid and we didn't, that's not herd immunity, that's just regular immunity. Because when I was younger, chicken pox was definitely a thing and lots of kids got it. Shingles doesn't come because you get reinfected with the virus - the virus is permanently in your system once you get chicken pox. It's forever. Shingles happens because it, for reasons not entirely known, decides to reactivate itself.

Herd immunity says that the most vulnerable people who may not be able to achieve immunity via other means (vaccine or simply infection) can be protected despite a lack of immunity because the vast majority of people around them are immune, so the disease has minimal vectors for infection and transmission. But that requires nearly EVERYBODY to be immune to work. If also requires that immunity to be long-lasting.
 
2020-06-25 6:06:52 AM  

haknudsen: Latest stuff I've seen says 2 months. That is bad news.


That was fark hyperbole. 13% of cases in a tiny (36 patient) survey in China showed no antibodies after two month. Which could just be bad tests, since the many antibody tests out there are still horribly unreliable. COVID-19 was rampant in many countries four months ago and there are no reports of widespread re-infection.
 
2020-06-25 6:07:56 AM  

Summoner101: Felgraf: Summoner101: Well, I mean, SARS and MERS were scary and there were plenty of researchers wanting to counteract them but they only hit a couple thousand over in Asia so who knew only years later we'd face another similar respiratory disease where that research would've been useful?  The pharma companies needed to make money now.

.. .A vaccine for SARS was almost completed, then wasn't needed anymore. They *were* researching it. It kind of takes time to develop something like that, and by the time they were close to ready, the threat had passed.

Right, and because there was no profit incentive any longer they never finished it.  Might've been helpful.


This is why medical research should be done my universities, for the sake of medicine and skills development. The vaccine would still have been completed if a university was working on it. It would have probably given us a few PhD projects and a vaccine, that could be used for development of future vaccines.
 
2020-06-25 6:08:44 AM  

Felgraf: Summoner101: Well, I mean, SARS and MERS were scary and there were plenty of researchers wanting to counteract them but they only hit a couple thousand over in Asia so who knew only years later we'd face another similar respiratory disease where that research would've been useful?  The pharma companies needed to make money now.

.. .A vaccine for SARS was almost completed, then wasn't needed anymore. They *were* researching it. It kind of takes time to develop something like that, and by the time they were close to ready, the threat had passed.


The Oxford vaccine under trial at the moment is a repurposed SARS one which had already gone through all the preliminary trials. Maybe that's the one you meant?
 
2020-06-25 6:13:48 AM  

Bennie Crabtree: Maturin: haknudsen: Ostman: This is probably a stupid question, but as far as I know you can contract Covid more than once.
Doesn't the concept of herd immunity fall apart in this scenario; whereas for something like smallpox it does work because it's a one-and-done disease?

Latest stuff I've seen says 2 months.  That is bad news.

The concept of herd immunity falls apart without a vaccine. There is no disease in which herd immunity exists because of natural immunity.

Chicken pox, after you've had it once. (Not everyone gets shingles later).


Not everyone gets chicken pox though. I did, (and now there's a vaccine), but some escaped it.
 
2020-06-25 6:42:10 AM  
How about "Box of Rocks" fest?
 
2020-06-25 7:06:21 AM  

snoproblem: How about "Box of Rocks" fest?


That's what Lilith Fair changed it's name to after booking heavier acts.
 
2020-06-25 7:32:50 AM  
Lol Bobaflex. Always groan-worthy. figures they're playing trumpy dipshiat fest.
 
2020-06-25 7:35:07 AM  

orbister: The Oxford vaccine under trial at the moment is a repurposed SARS one which had already gone through all the preliminary trials. Maybe that's the one you meant?


Repurposed vaccine method. The actual vaccine is different. If vaccines were wide spectrum Influenza wouldn't be a thing.
 
2020-06-25 7:35:34 AM  

haknudsen: Ostman: This is probably a stupid question, but as far as I know you can contract Covid more than once.
Doesn't the concept of herd immunity fall apart in this scenario; whereas for something like smallpox it does work because it's a one-and-done disease?

Latest stuff I've seen says 2 months.  That is bad news.


Antibodies are only part of an immune system. Another are the memory t-cells that can recognize pathogens long after antibodies are flushed out.

The purpose of some of these studies is to see how long an antibody test would be useful as part of a "passport" system.
 
2020-06-25 7:47:01 AM  

orbister: haknudsen: Latest stuff I've seen says 2 months. That is bad news.

That was fark hyperbole. 13% of cases in a tiny (36 patient) survey in China showed no antibodies after two month. Which could just be bad tests, since the many antibody tests out there are still horribly unreliable. COVID-19 was rampant in many countries four months ago and there are no reports of widespread re-infection.


Well, news hyperbole, amplified by Fark.

The number of times I've seen a news story with 'In a non-peer reviewed paper' or 'in a preprint article' is legion. The correct answer when you see those is to go to your image folder, find the "Stopped Reading There!" kid, and post that instead.

There have been, to my knowledge, exactly 0 confirmed cases of reinfection by SARS-CoV-2. Every single "case" discovered has turned out to be an error - a bad test, a lab screw up, or a misdiagnosis. Yes, I think the definition of suck is "getting influenza after getting out of the hospital with COVID-19" but that's not a reinfection, that's just shiatty luck. If you wish to offer proof that there was a case of reinfection in humans, I accept peer-reviewed articles in reliable journals only.

It's still unclear if dogs get infections or just carry the virus. It is clear that cats can be infected, some cats get a fairly serious upper respiratory tract infection. So far, no evidence for more severe cases but I'd bet there isn't that many people looking. The bigger risk for you with cats is if they're outdoor cats and bring the virus to you.

Immunity has been confirmed in a number of patients and in animal studies. How long? Well, we can't tell you longer than 6 months because we've only known about this virus in humans for 6 months so ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ but it's at least that, and if we can get to a year, then it's a simple case of "go get your flu and COVID shot, you farking idiot."

Indeed, if I were an insurance company, I'd write it so that if you don't get your COVID shot every year, you'd not be covered for COVID-19. A few years, we should have killed off enough anti-vaxxers to break the transmission chain. Or at least make them wear a "I'm a farking idiot who won't get my COVID-19 shot" masks.
 
2020-06-25 7:50:19 AM  
I've realized that a lot of people aren't even clear what herd immunity means.  They don't think of it as "when X% of people are immune, the disease can't efficiently spread."  They think of it as "eventually, the disease goes away."
 
2020-06-25 8:03:08 AM  

Medic Zero: Who?.jpg


Sadly (in my eyes anyway), thanks to the Balkanization of rock, most acts created in the past 20 years or so get this reaction from me. Record companies just don't care about rock acts anymore so they don't promote for shiat. At most I know most bands from a song or two; in this case, Nonpoint plays "Breaking Skin" and did a cover of "In the Air Tonight" for the Miami Vice movie with Colin Farrell and Jamie Foxx.
 
2020-06-25 8:08:42 AM  

Bennie Crabtree: Maturin: haknudsen: Ostman: This is probably a stupid question, but as far as I know you can contract Covid more than once.
Doesn't the concept of herd immunity fall apart in this scenario; whereas for something like smallpox it does work because it's a one-and-done disease?

Latest stuff I've seen says 2 months.  That is bad news.

The concept of herd immunity falls apart without a vaccine. There is no disease in which herd immunity exists because of natural immunity.

Chicken pox, after you've had it once. (Not everyone gets shingles later).


We do not have hard immunity to chicken pox.
 
2020-06-25 8:16:00 AM  
The website wants me to download their app made by WASP mobile LLC.   Sounds about right.
 
2020-06-25 8:27:18 AM  

rcain: "New posters for the event show that Adelitas Way have replaced Nonpoint on the bill, while the bands Sponge, Beyond Threshold, and The Night Crawlers have been added since yesterday. The rest of the lineup, including Static-X, Dope, Bobaflex, Royal Bliss, and more, remains intact"


Wow, what a bunch of shiat-tier nobodies. And that's their "big name" center stage acts. But I guess kiddos are so pent up from months of lock down they'd pay money and road trip it for a polka-fest at this point


I thought the guy from Static-X killed himself a while ago? Never even heard of the rest of those bands...guessing they're all aught rock power whiners?
 
2020-06-25 8:27:21 AM  

rcain: "New posters for the event show that Adelitas Way have replaced Nonpoint on the bill, while the bands Sponge, Beyond Threshold, and The Night Crawlers have been added since yesterday. The rest of the lineup, including Static-X, Dope, Bobaflex, Royal Bliss, and more, remains intact"


Wow, what a bunch of shiat-tier nobodies. And that's their "big name" center stage acts. But I guess kiddos are so pent up from months of lock down they'd pay money and road trip it for a polka-fest at this point


Depends on who's playing.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-06-25 8:32:03 AM  

Spartapuss: I must have missed the first thread but am curious about the ratio of Wisconsin Death Trip puns to other comments.


Difficulty: zombie Wayne
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-06-25 8:34:17 AM  

Abacus9: Not everyone gets chicken pox though. I did, (and now there's a vaccine), but some escaped it.


The vaccine does not last forever if you never had it. If someone has shingles they can actually infect someone with chicken pox. Happened to a guy I use to work with. He never had the vaccine and never had the pox. He was 27 and spent 6 days in the hospital. It also made him steril.
 
2020-06-25 8:36:00 AM  
Rebranded as Lollacorona Festival.
 
2020-06-25 8:36:58 AM  

Bennie Crabtree: Maturin: haknudsen: Ostman: This is probably a stupid question, but as far as I know you can contract Covid more than once.
Doesn't the concept of herd immunity fall apart in this scenario; whereas for something like smallpox it does work because it's a one-and-done disease?

Latest stuff I've seen says 2 months.  That is bad news.

The concept of herd immunity falls apart without a vaccine. There is no disease in which herd immunity exists because of natural immunity.

Chicken pox, after you've had it once. (Not everyone gets shingles later).


There are constant outbreaks of chicken pox, though not as much as when I was a kid because of vaccine.

There is still no herd immunity to chicken pox, because there are constantly new outbreaks. I think that's what he's driving at.
 
2020-06-25 8:46:26 AM  

Abacus9: Bennie Crabtree: Maturin: haknudsen: Ostman: This is probably a stupid question, but as far as I know you can contract Covid more than once.
Doesn't the concept of herd immunity fall apart in this scenario; whereas for something like smallpox it does work because it's a one-and-done disease?

Latest stuff I've seen says 2 months.  That is bad news.

The concept of herd immunity falls apart without a vaccine. There is no disease in which herd immunity exists because of natural immunity.

Chicken pox, after you've had it once. (Not everyone gets shingles later).

Not everyone gets chicken pox though. I did, (and now there's a vaccine), but some escaped it.


I got it twice...
 
2020-06-25 8:49:30 AM  
If you're willing to risk a gathering like this during a pandemic, you're evil. If you do it to see Static X and Bobaflex, you're evil AND pathetically tasteless.
 
2020-06-25 9:00:23 AM  

Ostman: This is probably a stupid question, but as far as I know you can contract Covid more than once.
Doesn't the concept of herd immunity fall apart in this scenario; whereas for something like smallpox it does work because it's a one-and-done disease?


Smallpox is the worst example for that... We have zero herd immunity for it, and hardly any vaccine stock. There is no smallpox now because WHO, with unilateral participation from damn near the entire planet in a way that hasn't been seen before or since, spend an ungogly amount of money and time ringing every documented outbreak with a massive isolation and inoculation response. They then managed to get nearly every country (looking at you, US and Russia...) to destroy their stocks and stop research on it. Countries aggressively developing bigger and better nuclear bombs, and more potent nerve gases, took a step back and agreed that smallpox was a real b*tch to have around. Luckily, it progresses fast enough and presents with glaringly obvious symptoms early enough that we could sort of get a handle on it if it escaped a lab somewhere. A concerted, distributed outbreak though, could knock humanity back to feudalism and local agrarian society for a couple generations.
 
2020-06-25 9:45:51 AM  
It is being held in Ringle. I was born 2 hours away from there and have lived in Wisconsin my entire life and never heard of it.

Looked it up and it is Up Nort. Nothing important will be in danger.
 
2020-06-25 9:53:43 AM  

Bennie Crabtree: Maturin: haknudsen: Ostman: This is probably a stupid question, but as far as I know you can contract Covid more than once.
Doesn't the concept of herd immunity fall apart in this scenario; whereas for something like smallpox it does work because it's a one-and-done disease?

Latest stuff I've seen says 2 months.  That is bad news.

The concept of herd immunity falls apart without a vaccine. There is no disease in which herd immunity exists because of natural immunity.

Chicken pox, after you've had it once. (Not everyone gets shingles later).


That is not herd immunity. That is individual immunity. We don't see chicken pox now because there is an effective vaccine.
 
2020-06-25 9:56:46 AM  

pkjun: Maturin: haknudsen: Ostman: This is probably a stupid question, but as far as I know you can contract Covid more than once.
Doesn't the concept of herd immunity fall apart in this scenario; whereas for something like smallpox it does work because it's a one-and-done disease?

Latest stuff I've seen says 2 months.  That is bad news.

The concept of herd immunity falls apart without a vaccine. There is no disease in which herd immunity exists because of natural immunity.

Well yes, but that's survivorship bias. Plenty of novel pathogens have burned out once their host populations developed herd immunity. We just don't have them any more.

(Or, like the Black Death, they would come in waves, then burn out due to herd immunity, then come roaring back a generation later once that herd immunity subsided with the birth of a large number of new and non-immune children)

There's no guarantee that natural herd immunity will make covid-19 go away, but there's no guarantee it won't, either. Right now we're still in "who knows" territory.


Bubonic plague was not human to human transmission but from flea bites. It burns out not from herd immunity but because the reservoir (rats) is controlled or no longer harbors the infection.
 
2020-06-25 10:14:07 AM  

Ostman: This is probably a stupid question, but as far as I know you can contract Covid more than once.
Doesn't the concept of herd immunity fall apart in this scenario; whereas for something like smallpox it does work because it's a one-and-done disease?


You are correct. Also early research has shown that your immunity collapses very quickly.
 
2020-06-25 10:21:45 AM  
So they bailed on the gig because of the festival's name, and not because it's an idiotic and irresponsible thing to do in the first place? WTF is that?
 
2020-06-25 10:31:11 AM  

solokumba: Abacus9: Not everyone gets chicken pox though. I did, (and now there's a vaccine), but some escaped it.

The vaccine does not last forever if you never had it. If someone has shingles they can actually infect someone with chicken pox. Happened to a guy I use to work with. He never had the vaccine and never had the pox. He was 27 and spent 6 days in the hospital. It also made him steril.


I might chance the vaccine just on the chance of sterility. Now which testicle do I inject it in agaiYOWWWWW NOT THAT ONE!
 
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