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(Inquisitr)   COVID-19 antibodies projected to stick around for only 2 months, which is still longer than my ex, sniff   (inquisitr.com) divider line
    More: Fail, Immune system, Vaccination, new study, Bacteria, Immunology, Antibody, Humoral immunity, Immunity  
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2177 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Jun 2020 at 5:20 PM (9 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-06-24 4:55:09 PM  
I'll wait for confirmation, but this doesn't bode well for an effective vaccine.

/adjusts mask
 
2020-06-24 5:10:24 PM  
It was about two months after I got sick that I got an antibody test.  Negative.

And yet, the illness I had really only fits covid.
 
2020-06-24 5:11:10 PM  

Tr0mBoNe: I'll wait for confirmation, but this doesn't bode well for an effective vaccine.

/adjusts mask


No, it doesn't. Just like the symptoms, the life of antibodies differs from person to person from what I've read. Some people have definitely had the virus twice already.
 
2020-06-24 5:12:08 PM  

Chris Ween: It was about two months after I got sick that I got an antibody test.  Negative.

And yet, the illness I had really only fits covid.


Any aftereffects, or are you ok now?
 
2020-06-24 5:22:22 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-06-24 5:23:19 PM  
Not seeing that here in Switzerland. The roche test is the most accurate and shows a high antibody response. This article is probably with shiatty Chinese made antibody tests.
 
2020-06-24 5:23:45 PM  

lindalouwho: Tr0mBoNe: I'll wait for confirmation, but this doesn't bode well for an effective vaccine.

/adjusts mask

No, it doesn't. Just like the symptoms, the life of antibodies differs from person to person from what I've read. Some people have definitely had the virus twice already.


And there are other parts of the immune system that are involved other than antibodies.
 
2020-06-24 5:26:05 PM  
FTFA:  "However, the Chinese study was small and limited in scope"

Yeah.  Wake me up when you have a better study.  Preferably one that's been subjected to peer review.
 
2020-06-24 5:26:05 PM  
We can't reopen. We need to quarantine this thing into submission. Nobody can afford to get a medium case of COVID twice a year.
 
2020-06-24 5:29:41 PM  
Among the patients who weren't sick, 40 percent had no antibodies in their system just 2 months after they were diagnosed.

That's bad news, the next time they don't get sick they wont have any antibodies to keep them from getting sick.
 
2020-06-24 5:29:42 PM  

null: lindalouwho: Tr0mBoNe: I'll wait for confirmation, but this doesn't bode well for an effective vaccine.

/adjusts mask

No, it doesn't. Just like the symptoms, the life of antibodies differs from person to person from what I've read. Some people have definitely had the virus twice already.

And there are other parts of the immune system that are involved other than antibodies.


Yeah, I don't think this means you would need to get a vaccine every two months or something stupid like that.

/at least I hope not
 
2020-06-24 5:29:43 PM  

Chris Ween: It was about two months after I got sick that I got an antibody test.  Negative.

And yet, the illness I had really only fits covid.


I was sick in March with a temperature of 103.8 right when cars were spiking. I just had an antibody test and it came back negative.
 
2020-06-24 5:29:58 PM  

comrade: Not seeing that here in Switzerland. The roche test is the most accurate and shows a high antibody response. This article is probably with shiatty Chinese made antibody tests.


Lets hope so
 
2020-06-24 5:29:59 PM  
*cases were spiking
 
2020-06-24 5:30:03 PM  
Isn't that super common in other coronavirus-family viruses? The rapid mutation paired with the limited immunity response.

I'm not a doctor, just a guy who reads a lot so I'd value actual professional input.
 
2020-06-24 5:31:08 PM  
The virus will eventually get tired of mutating because we're so stupid.
 
2020-06-24 5:31:53 PM  

Bennie Crabtree: Nobody can afford to get a medium case of COVID twice a year.


What with all the shelter in place, work from home, the stimulus check and all the bars being closed... I think I can afford a few nice things... and as soon as we get a vaccine I swear I will crack open my wallet.
 
2020-06-24 5:32:36 PM  

CarnySaur: The virus will eventually get tired of mutating because we're so stupid.


...which is why it's called the "Trump Virus" around here.
 
2020-06-24 5:32:55 PM  

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: Isn't that super common in other coronavirus-family viruses? The rapid mutation paired with the limited immunity response.

I'm not a doctor, just a guy who reads a lot so I'd value actual professional input.


I think you may have forgotten which site you are posting on.
 
2020-06-24 5:33:42 PM  

geekbikerskum: FTFA:  "However, the Chinese study was small and limited in scope"

Yeah.  Wake me up when you have a better study.  Preferably one that's been subjected to peer review.


^^^^^
 
2020-06-24 5:34:01 PM  
This study used the Bioscience assay to test for antibodies, not the Roche test.

It looks like antibody levels decreased over time, not that they were gone. Did antibodies against SARS/MERS also decrease over time? What amount of antibody is needed to maintain immunity in general?
 
2020-06-24 5:34:08 PM  
The article's from Homer.
 
2020-06-24 5:34:17 PM  

Tr0mBoNe: I'll wait for confirmation, but this doesn't bode well for an effective vaccine.

/adjusts mask


There was a great post on this in r/askscience the other day. Several experts pretty much debunked the idea that this was even real or if it was big as it was. This was based on a 37 person study.

Here is teh thread (dont' like linking Reddit here, but this is pretty good stuff):
https://www.reddit.com/r/askscience/c​o​mments/hekhgw/a_study_today_showed_cov​id_antibodies_drop_off/fvs7dgh/

Relevant quote:

So those two studies, looking at nearly 500 patients, find no evidence for antibody decline, while this study, with just 37 patients, does find evidence. We can't ignore it, but we can discount it and wait for more evidence.
 
2020-06-24 5:34:40 PM  
Good one, God.
 
2020-06-24 5:35:54 PM  

geekbikerskum: FTFA:  "However, the Chinese study was small and limited in scope"

Yeah.  Wake me up when you have a better study.  Preferably one that's been subjected to peer review.


Yup.  This is the same study that was released last week and there was a Fark article on it; these guys just noticed it and are reporting on it.  Certainly doesn't mean it's wrong on it's own, but it hasn't been peer reviewed yet.

It doesn't mean a thing regarding a vaccine though.  You'd just need a booster shot, like we do for many other diseases already.
 
2020-06-24 5:36:30 PM  

lindalouwho: Some people have definitely had the virus twice already.


I wouldn't go that far. There are scattered anecdotes without proper testing performed to indicate true infection in either the primary or secondary case.  It may very well be that either was a false positive or there are long-term carriers of this virus as there are with several other well-studied coronaviruses (e.g. feline coronaviruses and FIP, and transmissible gastroenteritis of swine).

On top of that, measurable antibodies may or may not correlate with an effective immune response, and lower than detectable antibody levels do not mean that the plasma cells which produce them have disappeared, leaving the host defenseless.  Perhaps more importantly, antibodies are not the body's sole means of viral defense, with T cell responses (antibody independent) likely playing an important role in ongoing and long-term immunity to COVID.

But hey, I've been wrong before as you well know.
 
2020-06-24 5:37:03 PM  
I asked my doctor on Friday about getting an antibody test to explain my late March illness.  He recommended against it because some of them are 20% false negative.

He also says the last Covid case he saw was 2 weeks ago, but in March he had 3-4 a day.  We got it pretty early here in Atlanta.  Two people in my office had it.
 
2020-06-24 5:37:20 PM  
COVID-19 antibodies projected to stick around for only 2 months, which is still longer than my ex, sniff

I did, she smells fine.
 
2020-06-24 5:37:50 PM  

Tom Marvolo Bombadil: Among the patients who weren't sick, 40 percent had no antibodies in their system just 2 months after they were diagnosed.

That's bad news, the next time they don't get sick they wont have any antibodies to keep them from getting sick.


It's possible that they're just not susceptible.  (although they could be in the future if something about their immune status changes)
 
2020-06-24 5:39:41 PM  

Bennie Crabtree: We can't reopen. We need to quarantine this thing into submission. Nobody can afford to get a medium case of COVID twice a year.


Yeah but think of the profits the hospitals and the insurance companies will make
 
2020-06-24 5:39:49 PM  
Also, can't the memory cells just make more antibodies if the body is re-exposed? Immunology 101 was so farking long ago.
 
2020-06-24 5:42:17 PM  

fiddlehead: What amount of antibody is needed to maintain immunity in general?


There is almost no good data on this, no studies in humans to show "you need an antibody titer of (e.g.) 1:40 to prevent you from getting measles/tetanus/whatever" because those studies are almost impossible to do ethically and effectively.

And as I mentioned above, antibody responses are not the only ones involved in viral immunity.

I recommend against having titers taken when clients have a question about the need for vaccination for this reason.  It's a big black box.
 
2020-06-24 5:46:43 PM  

Tomfoolery Rules Over Logical Living: You'd just need a booster shot, like we do for many other diseases already.


I've been predicting that we'll be getting yearly COVID booster vaccinations, likely included in our yearly influenza vaccines.  It's also possible the first will require a booster in 2-3mos, but I think they'd want to have a general level of initial vaccines given across the public before they start considering boosters.  Also, I don't think any of the Phase II/III trials include a booster given soon after the initial, but it may be something they continue to work on as things progress.
 
2020-06-24 5:48:22 PM  
... ?

Isn't it more important whether the body can quickly ramp antibody production back up?
 
2020-06-24 5:48:27 PM  
man, this just keeps getting better
 
2020-06-24 5:52:49 PM  

Bennie Crabtree: We can't reopen. We need to quarantine this thing into submission. Nobody can afford to get a medium case of COVID twice a year.


Even if a vaccine can be developed to knock this thing out - quarantining it into submission would be faster and healthier for the economy anyway!
 
2020-06-24 5:55:42 PM  
I don't even claim to play a doctor on tv but something that make you this sick. I gotta believe your body is going to recognize this farker for a while. The flu mutates, from the little I've read this virus doesn't to a large degree.
Anyone who has any medical qualifications please chime in.
 
2020-06-24 6:03:27 PM  

sgarri7777: I don't even claim to play a doctor on tv but something that make you this sick. I gotta believe your body is going to recognize this farker for a while. The flu mutates, from the little I've read this virus doesn't to a large degree.
Anyone who has any medical qualifications please chime in.


First, see all the comments above, but second the declining antibodies (if the results are to be believed) seem to be more pronounced in asymptomatic and mildly symptomatic cases. Therse folks were either exposed to a sub-critical dose or perhaps they're just not susceptible, due to expression patterns of the ACE2 receptor or perhaps their ACE2 receptor subtype.
 
2020-06-24 6:03:41 PM  

comrade: Not seeing that here in Switzerland. The roche test is the most accurate and shows a high antibody response. This article is probably with shiatty Chinese made antibody tests.


This from a comrade?  We are disappointed in you comrade!
 
2020-06-24 6:05:22 PM  

lindalouwho: Tr0mBoNe: I'll wait for confirmation, but this doesn't bode well for an effective vaccine.

/adjusts mask

No, it doesn't. Just like the symptoms, the life of antibodies differs from person to person from what I've read. Some people have definitely had the virus twice already.


Also, T-cells are extremely important in the process and even after the antibodies fade, the T-cells are active far longer.  In fact, some studies have shown the people who are asymptomatic harbor T-cells that react to COVID-19, even though they had not been exposed before.
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/scienc​e​-nature/coronavirus-immunity-complicat​ed-180974970/
 
2020-06-24 6:06:00 PM  

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: Isn't that super common in other coronavirus-family viruses? The rapid mutation paired with the limited immunity response.

I'm not a doctor, just a guy who reads a lot so I'd value actual professional input.


Are you lost?  You're looking for professional input on Fark?
 
2020-06-24 6:06:41 PM  

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: Isn't that super common in other coronavirus-family viruses? The rapid mutation paired with the limited immunity response.

I'm not a doctor, just a guy who reads a lot so I'd value actual professional input.


No, they don't mutate super-fast in the sense of like how the flu does it.

SARS v1 and MERS antibodies showed up for >18 months based on severity of case though.

The questions start with how good the tests being used are and if they pick up the right antibodies.

I would expect that if you get it once there is some antibody protection for a while and also immune system memory cells would remember it and get to work on it sooner.

Another thing is the swab testing picking up fragments of it, so you can get a test result of infected and not actually have the full virus.  Consider also there is a third kind of antibody in mucous membranes that also could be involved in stopping it there before it gets too much further so you might not have the antibodies that show up on tests or not enough to show up.

My final thought is that consider that this is really the first pandemic of the modern (Internet) era and how many eyes are focused on it and how many resources are working on it.

In the middle of everything else we are probably learning tons about the immune system and viruses and the human body that we didn't know before and it's gonna take decades to sort it all out.  Instead of a few research grants with piddly-fark money behind them we have multiple nations and corporations throwing beaucoup bucks at coronavirus research, and everyone throwing out pre-press/pre-review papers out as fast as they can write 'em and the media making them into headlines as fast as they can misread them.  So while I believe the stories about blood type and vitamin D playing roles in severity of illness, we haven't had as much focus on checking the testing front.

I've worked in banks and schools and I figured I was always swimming in a sea of crud, and I am in IT so I got to touch all the gross keyboards, mice, control panels and buttons, and got to blow the dust out of everything, so ultimately I figure constant repeat exposure to COVID-19 (or anything else, really) is expected and if anything that means my body ought to be keeping up its stock of antibodies.  If ya don't use it ya lose it so staying completely isolated after getting it (or a vaccine) is probably more problematic in the long term.
 
2020-06-24 6:09:15 PM  
I have a buddy who had this and finally tested negative. He put his test results up on his Tinder profile and got some hits from it. He's going to be sad that it's only good for two months.
 
2020-06-24 6:09:34 PM  

Tr0mBoNe: I'll wait for confirmation, but this doesn't bode well for an effective vaccine.

/adjusts mask


Even if true - that not what the article says.  It says people who did not get sick had the antibodies fade in as little as two months.  So that is a lack of immunity among people the virus does not make sick anyways.  Among people who become sick, only 13% had antibodies fade that quickly.

There is no reason to believe a COVID-19 vaccine wouldn't be good for a year.
 
2020-06-24 6:10:43 PM  

oa330_man: I have a buddy who had this and finally tested negative. He put his test results up on his Tinder profile and got some hits from it. He's going to be sad that it's only good for two months.


Only if he never got sick.  If got sick, he might have a much longer immunity.
 
2020-06-24 6:14:05 PM  

null: Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: Isn't that super common in other coronavirus-family viruses? The rapid mutation paired with the limited immunity response.

I'm not a doctor, just a guy who reads a lot so I'd value actual professional input.

No, they don't mutate super-fast in the sense of like how the flu does it.

SARS v1 and MERS antibodies showed up for >18 months based on severity of case though.

The questions start with how good the tests being used are and if they pick up the right antibodies.

I would expect that if you get it once there is some antibody protection for a while and also immune system memory cells would remember it and get to work on it sooner.

Another thing is the swab testing picking up fragments of it, so you can get a test result of infected and not actually have the full virus.  Consider also there is a third kind of antibody in mucous membranes that also could be involved in stopping it there before it gets too much further so you might not have the antibodies that show up on tests or not enough to show up.

My final thought is that consider that this is really the first pandemic of the modern (Internet) era and how many eyes are focused on it and how many resources are working on it.

In the middle of everything else we are probably learning tons about the immune system and viruses and the human body that we didn't know before and it's gonna take decades to sort it all out.  Instead of a few research grants with piddly-fark money behind them we have multiple nations and corporations throwing beaucoup bucks at coronavirus research, and everyone throwing out pre-press/pre-review papers out as fast as they can write 'em and the media making them into headlines as fast as they can misread them.  So while I believe the stories about blood type and vitamin D playing roles in severity of illness, we haven't had as much focus on checking the testing front.

I've worked in banks and schools and I figured I was always swimming in a sea of crud, and I ...


I believe this is the last influenza type pandemic humanity will ever experience.  New deadly strains will pop-up but based on everything learned, it will never result in a global pandemic again.
 
2020-06-24 6:20:16 PM  

Chris Ween: It was about two months after I got sick that I got an antibody test.  Negative.

And yet, the illness I had really only fits covid.


A friend was deathly ill in January and tested positive for antibodies in late April.  His doc believes the January illness was Covid.

/shrug
 
2020-06-24 6:26:05 PM  

Tr0mBoNe: I'll wait for confirmation, but this doesn't bode well for an effective vaccine.

/adjusts mask


======================================​=======

Because moron trollmitter fails to point out that this is for ASYMPTOMATIC cases... and is true of basically any disease where you're asymptomatic.

It's literally much ado about nothing.
 
2020-06-24 6:26:24 PM  
img2.looper.comView Full Size


Approves.........
 
2020-06-24 6:28:10 PM  

Keys dude: COVID-19 antibodies projected to stick around for only 2 months, which is still longer than my ex, sniff

I did, she smells fine.


Joe? Is that you?
 
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