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(WJAC TV Johnstown)   Not News: man caught driving with a suspended license. Fark: License is suspended until 2076   (wjactv.com) divider line
    More: Dumbass, Centre County man's driver, Driver's license, Driver's license in the United States, Driver's education, State College, Pennsylvania, license  
•       •       •

1751 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Jun 2020 at 2:42 PM (9 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



37 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2020-06-24 12:17:36 PM  
A lot of people get into a cycle where they keep piling up suspensions. They need to drive. They are suspended. If they get caught driving while suspended, they get a consecutive suspension. 56 years is unusually long, probably rarer than a lifetime ban, but it doesn't surprise me.
 
2020-06-24 2:44:17 PM  

ZAZ: A lot of people get into a cycle where they keep piling up suspensions. They need to drive. They are suspended. If they get caught driving while suspended, they get a consecutive suspension. 56 years is unusually long, probably rarer than a lifetime ban, but it doesn't surprise me.


The shiat public transport in the US doesn't help.
 
2020-06-24 2:47:27 PM  
Suspend it some more! That should work.
 
2020-06-24 2:47:55 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-06-24 2:49:19 PM  

ZAZ: A lot of people get into a cycle where they keep piling up suspensions. They need to drive. They are suspended. If they get caught driving while suspended, they get a consecutive suspension. 56 years is unusually long, probably rarer than a lifetime ban, but it doesn't surprise me.


Except they have this thing called an occupational license (not sure if every State has this), where as long as it is to and from work only, they can drive.  While I agree 56 years seems extremely excessive, something tells me the man wasn't following proper procedure to have earned such excess.
 
2020-06-24 2:51:06 PM  

ZAZ: A lot of people get into a cycle where they keep piling up suspensions. They need to drive. They are suspended. If they get caught driving while suspended, they get a consecutive suspension. 56 years is unusually long, probably rarer than a lifetime ban, but it doesn't surprise me.


And most of the time the suspensions are waiting on payment of some fee to undo it. So people are driving to go to work to pay to get their license suspension ended and they get another suspension that extends it longer, raises the fee they have to pay, or both.
 
2020-06-24 2:54:11 PM  
In the early 90s I worked with two guys who had their licenses suspended into the early years of this century. DUIs were a factor.
 
2020-06-24 2:54:13 PM  

Resident Muslim: Suspend it some more! That should work.


i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2020-06-24 2:54:58 PM  
They didn't even bother putting his age in there? Half-ass reporting here.
 
2020-06-24 2:55:36 PM  
They will definitely have flying cars by then.  For real this time.
 
2020-06-24 2:59:48 PM  

Vorpal: They will definitely have flying cars by then.  For real this time.


So? We can watch a man with a suspended FLYING license crash his car into another flying car?
 
2020-06-24 3:00:10 PM  

mottsnil: Except they have this thing called an occupational license (not sure if every State has this), where as long as it is to and from work only, they can drive.  While I agree 56 years seems extremely excessive, something tells me the man wasn't following proper procedure to have earned such excess.


That system is rigged to where you have to hire a lawyer to get your restricted license.

In my state it's where you go to a hearing officer at the DMV. They ask you some basic questions about what you need to drive for, what you will do to ensure you drive safely, etc. and then forward some paperwork to headquarters. Then you wait. And you wait. And you wait some more. And you call headquarters to ask and they say they haven't made a decision yet. And then you wait some more.

In my suspended license case, I was suspended from December through February. As soon as I got the suspension letter I went to file for a restricted license to drive for work and school. And I waited, and waited, and waited. Meanwhile, while suspended, I drove everywhere I needed to go. And I waited, and waited, and waited. Finally, during the next to last week of the suspension, I got a letter denying a restricted license. One of the reasons stated for denial was that I didn't provide a very specific list of routes that I needed to drive for work. They apparently require you to list every single street you will drive on, the direction of travel that you take to and from work, the times you will be driving (because they can apparently restrict it during some hours like at night). I was working a job for a beverage distributor that had a variable schedule, started as early as 4am, and I could be assigned to go work at any grocery store in the area of distribution to put product on the shelves. The DMV said they didn't think I needed to be driving during early morning hours (despite my work starting that early), they said I didn't provide a regular work schedule (because it changed week to week), and it wasn't acceptable that I said I needed to drive to any grocery store in the distribution area (which I could be assigned to do depending on my work route).

Meanwhile, if you hire a lawyer to show up at your hearing, it's overwhelming likely that your license is approved. It's almost as if by making you spend the money to have a lawyer show up and answer the questions for you, the just approve it because you spent the money.

On top of that, if you hire THE RIGHT LAWYER in town, it's a 100% approval rate. I discovered this much later when I talked to someone else who had a suspended license and hired a specific lawyer that he was told to go to. Turns out this was because the lawyer charged $1,000 for a restricted license hearing, $500 of which is kicked to the hearing officer at the DMV who approves the license and the paperwork sails right through HQ to get your license approved.
 
2020-06-24 3:01:46 PM  

Pavia_Resistance: In the early 90s I worked with two guys who had their licenses suspended into the early years of this century. DUIs were a factor.


I worked with a guy who was permanently revoked. He had enough DUIs that he was never going to get a driver license again, period, no appeals. He's now in prison for the rest of his life (got sentenced to 64 years at 100% and he was in his 40s, so he's not getting out) so the driver license is a moot issue.
 
2020-06-24 3:05:58 PM  

inglixthemad: ZAZ: A lot of people get into a cycle where they keep piling up suspensions. They need to drive. They are suspended. If they get caught driving while suspended, they get a consecutive suspension. 56 years is unusually long, probably rarer than a lifetime ban, but it doesn't surprise me.

The shiat public transport in the US doesn't help.


Public Transportation is European socialisms!
 
2020-06-24 3:07:25 PM  

mrmopar5287: Pavia_Resistance: In the early 90s I worked with two guys who had their licenses suspended into the early years of this century. DUIs were a factor.

I worked with a guy who was permanently revoked. He had enough DUIs that he was never going to get a driver license again, period, no appeals. He's now in prison for the rest of his life (got sentenced to 64 years at 100% and he was in his 40s, so he's not getting out) so the driver license is a moot issue.


I was going to "Good. Before he killed someone."
But looking at that sentence he received I'm not that sure.
 
2020-06-24 3:13:36 PM  
Elwood?
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-06-24 3:14:21 PM  

mrmopar5287: mottsnil: Except they have this thing called an occupational license (not sure if every State has this), where as long as it is to and from work only, they can drive.  While I agree 56 years seems extremely excessive, something tells me the man wasn't following proper procedure to have earned such excess.

That system is rigged to where you have to hire a lawyer to get your restricted license.

In my state it's where you go to a hearing officer at the DMV. They ask you some basic questions about what you need to drive for, what you will do to ensure you drive safely, etc. and then forward some paperwork to headquarters. Then you wait. And you wait. And you wait some more. And you call headquarters to ask and they say they haven't made a decision yet. And then you wait some more.

In my suspended license case, I was suspended from December through February. As soon as I got the suspension letter I went to file for a restricted license to drive for work and school. And I waited, and waited, and waited. Meanwhile, while suspended, I drove everywhere I needed to go. And I waited, and waited, and waited. Finally, during the next to last week of the suspension, I got a letter denying a restricted license. One of the reasons stated for denial was that I didn't provide a very specific list of routes that I needed to drive for work. They apparently require you to list every single street you will drive on, the direction of travel that you take to and from work, the times you will be driving (because they can apparently restrict it during some hours like at night). I was working a job for a beverage distributor that had a variable schedule, started as early as 4am, and I could be assigned to go work at any grocery store in the area of distribution to put product on the shelves. The DMV said they didn't think I needed to be driving during early morning hours (despite my work starting that early), they said I didn't provide a regular work schedule (because it changed week to week), and it wasn't acceptable that I said I needed to drive to any grocery store in the distribution area (which I could be assigned to do depending on my work route).

Meanwhile, if you hire a lawyer to show up at your hearing, it's overwhelming likely that your license is approved. It's almost as if by making you spend the money to have a lawyer show up and answer the questions for you, the just approve it because you spent the money.

On top of that, if you hire THE RIGHT LAWYER in town, it's a 100% approval rate. I discovered this much later when I talked to someone else who had a suspended license and hired a specific lawyer that he was told to go to. Turns out this was because the lawyer charged $1,000 for a restricted license hearing, $500 of which is kicked to the hearing officer at the DMV who approves the license and the paperwork sails right through HQ to get your license approved.


So I always had this thought:

Who makes laws? Lawyers. They help in the drafting, the breakdowns, the severity.
Do you think, by human tendency, that they will make laws that makes them, as lawyers, less needed or more needed?

/any law that can't be understood by a 9th grader (who could be tried as an adult) should be thrown out the window and redrafted
//difficulty, today's 9th graders
///yes, "back in my day" and get off my lawn
 
2020-06-24 3:15:34 PM  
It's important to note that a lot of license suspensions have nothing to do with operating a motor vehicle improperly, or even unpaid fines for motor vehicle violations.  Driver license suspension is an all-purpose administrative punishment that routinely gets imposed for all sorts of stuff that has no connection whatsoever to operating a motor vehicle unsafely or failing to obey traffic laws.
 
2020-06-24 3:15:41 PM  
He'll wind up driving a taxi in NYC.
 
2020-06-24 3:20:42 PM  

Resident Muslim: I was going to "Good. Before he killed someone."
But looking at that sentence he received I'm not that sure.


I worked with him at a restaurant where he was a cook. He was a total drunk before (obviously, with the DUIs) and he was a chronic weed user to self-medicate. Anyways, he was convicted of 19 counts of child molestation. He was friends with some of the waitresses at the restaurant and he would babysit their kids (and molest a bunch of them).
 
2020-06-24 3:22:10 PM  

MBooda: Elwood?
[Fark user image 703x703]


License number is a little off. It implies he was born in 1952 but was first licensed in 1987 (after the movie came out, and also long after he turned 16-18 and would expect to first be licensed in Illinois.
 
2020-06-24 3:27:49 PM  

Resident Muslim: Do you think, by human tendency, that they will make laws that makes them, as lawyers, less needed or more needed?


It has a lot to do with the bureaucracy of the Illinois Secretary of State Office. Dealing with them is like dealing with Volgons. Their ability and willingness to be obstinate in order to generate more revenue (fees) to them is unparalleled.

With my experience recounted above, it shouldn't take about 80% of the length of a license suspension to get an answer back about getting a restricted license. And it shouldn't be so rigid as to be unable to comprehend that someone works a job, needs to drive, and needs to drive a variety of places for said job. Their belief that I must provide all specific addresses of place I go for work, at specific times, and along specific routes is entirely unworkable for the job I was doing. It was literally impossible to do, and I suspect it was purposely designed that way to make it impossible to attain a restricted permit for most people.

Sure, there are people who work 8-5 jobs, M-F, at some specific location that they can commute there and back within whatever arbitrary time restrictions are placed on it. No driving at night? What about people who work a 3rd shift job?

I don't know if it changed. Following getting my license back I promptly got a license in another state that they couldn't suspend and used that for a number of years just to get past their bullshiat.
 
2020-06-24 3:28:15 PM  

mrmopar5287: mottsnil: Except they have this thing called an occupational license (not sure if every State has this), where as long as it is to and from work only, they can drive.  While I agree 56 years seems extremely excessive, something tells me the man wasn't following proper procedure to have earned such excess.

That system is rigged to where you have to hire a lawyer to get your restricted license.

In my state it's where you go to a hearing officer at the DMV. They ask you some basic questions about what you need to drive for, what you will do to ensure you drive safely, etc. and then forward some paperwork to headquarters. Then you wait. And you wait. And you wait some more. And you call headquarters to ask and they say they haven't made a decision yet. And then you wait some more.

In my suspended license case, I was suspended from December through February. As soon as I got the suspension letter I went to file for a restricted license to drive for work and school. And I waited, and waited, and waited. Meanwhile, while suspended, I drove everywhere I needed to go. And I waited, and waited, and waited. Finally, during the next to last week of the suspension, I got a letter denying a restricted license. One of the reasons stated for denial was that I didn't provide a very specific list of routes that I needed to drive for work. They apparently require you to list every single street you will drive on, the direction of travel that you take to and from work, the times you will be driving (because they can apparently restrict it during some hours like at night). I was working a job for a beverage distributor that had a variable schedule, started as early as 4am, and I could be assigned to go work at any grocery store in the area of distribution to put product on the shelves. The DMV said they didn't think I needed to be driving during early morning hours (despite my work starting that early), they said I didn't provide a regular work schedule (because it changed week to we ...


Thank you Mrmopar for that perspective.  While I have never (and hope to never) had to apply for one, I was unaware that some (I hope not all!) would make it a very difficult process.  It really shouldn't be, I mean if you have already been punished for whatever infraction it was that suspended your license, that should be enough to make it a lesson learned.  There shouldn't be more punishment meted out in the process of obtaining an occupational license.
 
2020-06-24 3:30:00 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
Not quite the same but it'll do.
 
2020-06-24 3:42:26 PM  
Wow, look at the empathy you guys are expressing for this man! So I'm going to express the opposite view from my side of towns street.

Throw his ass in jail for 5-10 years. Once he's out, have him retake the test and give him back his license. Easy peasy.

Oh wait, that would ruin his life? *Studies my too long, natural nails.* So what? Fark him.

What's good for the black goose is good for the white gander. Apply the farking laws equally or don't enforce them at all.
 
2020-06-24 3:47:19 PM  

mottsnil: Thank you Mrmopar for that perspective.  While I have never (and hope to never) had to apply for one, I was unaware that some (I hope not all!) would make it a very difficult process.  It really shouldn't be, I mean if you have already been punished for whatever infraction it was that suspended your license, that should be enough to make it a lesson learned.  There shouldn't be more punishment meted out in the process of obtaining an occupational license.


In the bureaucracy in Illinois, there are two ways to get a limited driving permit.

If the suspension is being imposed as part of a crime (a traffic crime of some sort), the judge has the discretion to authorize a "judicial driving permit." This is where the judge rules that you can drive for work, to church, doctor appointments, etc. but are not allowed to drive for other reasons for the length of the suspension. I think it's also been codified in law for DUIs where you can get a breathalyzer ignition interlock on your personal vehicle to drive to/from work, and if you drive a work vehicle you can do that without an interlock as long as your employer has a policy in place (which can be as simple as them saying "No employee is allowed to drive while drunk").

However, if the suspension is administrative (meaning it's done by the Secretary of State as opposed to a court action), you are in the nightmare of dealing with the most evil bureaucracy to ever exist: the wretched hive of scum and villainy that is the DMV. In my case, the law in Illinois used to be that if you had 3 moving violation convictions within a 12 month period of time, your license is automatically suspended for 3 months. At some point after I got my driver license they changed that rule to be if you had 2 moving violation convictions within a 24 month period of time while under the age of 21, you got a 3 month suspension. So, before that was changed I had pleaded guilty to a speeding ticket because I did it. Then, after the change, I got a ticket for an "improper left turn" when I turned left on a green arrow, got t-boned by someone else running a red light, and police believed their story because I was just the young punk who got clobbered by a middle-aged woman in a Cadillac. The ticket was $75 and I didn't want to deal with trying to go to a trial (and lose, and get more court fines attached) so I just paid it. At no point during the plea hearing was I advised that it could lead to my license being suspended because that wasn't a court action being done, so it wasn't necessary. A couple months after the guilty plea hits the computer at the Secretary of State office, I get a letter in the mail telling me my license was going to be suspended for 3 months for something I knew absolutely nothing about and was never warned as part of the plea agreement.

I went back to see if the judge could undo the guilty plea and get a plea agreement that was for traffic school or court supervision (both keep a conviction off your record) but they couldn't do it after the guilty plea was already submitted.
 
2020-06-24 3:53:48 PM  

BlackChickWhiteAccent: *Studies my too long, natural nails.*


Funny enough, it was nails too long that got me a driver license with the wrong DOB on it. To this day it's 10 days off because the clerk with the long nails typing ticky-tacky on the computer keyboard entered 13 instead of 03 for the day of the month. She was white, though. No real harm done no matter who did it.
 
2020-06-24 3:55:36 PM  

BlackChickWhiteAccent: What's good for the black goose is good for the white gander. Apply the farking laws equally or don't enforce them at all.


I favor equal enforcement of the laws. I want to know the specific reasons for his suspension[s]. If it's solely because money hasn't been paid to end the suspension, that shiat needs to stop for everyone.
 
2020-06-24 3:57:36 PM  
People like that, should have a 25 pound block of concrete attached to their foot, or given the option
of spending time in jail until the suspension is over.

I remember when I was working 911 back in the late 80's, dispatched fire/rescue to a motorcycle/car
accident.  Motorcycle was sitting at a red light, drunk driver who had multiple DWI's & suspensions
rear ended him, killed the cyclist.  Never knew what happened to him but hopefully he is still in
prision.
 
2020-06-24 4:00:20 PM  
Yeah, a quick Googling of this guy reveals that he's no angel. He was sentenced to 9 to 30 years in prison in 2014, so he really shouldn't be out. I found some drug trafficking and gun charges, but that's it.
 
2020-06-24 4:13:47 PM  

ZAZ: A lot of people get into a cycle where they keep piling up suspensions. They need to drive. They are suspended. If they get caught driving while suspended, they get a consecutive suspension. 56 years is unusually long, probably rarer than a lifetime ban, but it doesn't surprise me.


When I worked in IT  at DMV there was a driver whose license we would use to test with that had over 400 suspensions. He would get a ticket, not show up, Get suspended, then show up and not pay the fines so would get suspended again.
 
2020-06-24 4:18:05 PM  

geekbikerskum: It's important to note that a lot of license suspensions have nothing to do with operating a motor vehicle improperly, or even unpaid fines for motor vehicle violations.  Driver license suspension is an all-purpose administrative punishment that routinely gets imposed for all sorts of stuff that has no connection whatsoever to operating a motor vehicle unsafely or failing to obey traffic laws.


True. In NY you can get suspended for not paying child support. In Florida for smoking tobacco under the age of 21.
 
2020-06-24 5:26:09 PM  

Flashlight: [Fark user image 850x850]Not quite the same but it'll do.


Nope, sorry, he's in Darby, PA, not  Philly.
 
2020-06-24 5:45:39 PM  
I know someone who should have his license suspended until 2085 or so.  It's not this guy, but some idiot who treats a license as a right and not a privilege.
 
2020-06-24 6:58:53 PM  

kdawg7736: Resident Muslim: Suspend it some more! That should work.

[i.pinimg.com image 800x800]


You know that quote is from a book, I believe.
 
2020-06-24 9:31:47 PM  
...and thus proof positive that gun licenses and registration won't work. SHALL NOT BE ABRIDGED!

/s
 
2020-06-24 11:24:14 PM  

mrmopar5287: ZAZ: A lot of people get into a cycle where they keep piling up suspensions. They need to drive. They are suspended. If they get caught driving while suspended, they get a consecutive suspension. 56 years is unusually long, probably rarer than a lifetime ban, but it doesn't surprise me.

And most of the time the suspensions are waiting on payment of some fee to undo it. So people are driving to go to work to pay to get their license suspension ended and they get another suspension that extends it longer, raises the fee they have to pay, or both.


The United States, home of the legal treadmill...
 
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