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(Guardian)   There's a stark difference between Whole Food's Starkey Springs water and their competitors. Mainly it's the extra arsenic   (theguardian.com) divider line
    More: Asinine, Water, Drinking water, Water supply network, Whole Foods, Starkey Spring Water, amount of arsenic, water brands, single bottle of Starkey  
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1305 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Jun 2020 at 5:50 PM (11 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



34 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-06-24 5:47:20 PM  
Meh, Third World problems.

/probably true of a lot of America's problems at this point
//more cynical than usual today
 
2020-06-24 5:49:22 PM  
Earth's Biggest Poison Store™
 
2020-06-24 5:53:40 PM  
Amazon and Jeff Bezos, killing everything they touch.
 
2020-06-24 5:54:29 PM  
CR recently tested dozens of bottled water brands and found that Starkey Spring Water, introduced by Whole Foods in 2015, had concerning levels of arsenic, ranging from 9.49 to 9.56 parts per billion (PPB), at least three times the level of every other brand tested. Federal regulations require manufacturers to limit the amount of arsenic, a potentially dangerous heavy metal, in bottled water to 10 PPB. CR experts believe that level does not adequately protect public health.

Let's see, 9.56 < 10. They don't even report the uncertainty in the measurements. Consumer Reports, which I'd barely trust to test ballpoint pens, is an expert on levels of arsenic in water. Everything about this is so untrustworthy it's not worth discussing further.
 
2020-06-24 5:56:08 PM  
Ahh, cool, crisp, clean and relaxing arsenic. Nothing calms your nerves like arsenic.
 
2020-06-24 5:57:06 PM  
Remember when Coke rolled out their Desani bottled water brand it was later discovered it was chock full of carcinogens?

Ya, it's like that. Good times

Seems our corporate mega brands can't make a damn thing that doesn't poison or outright kill you
 
2020-06-24 6:05:53 PM  
It's all natural!
 
2020-06-24 6:11:12 PM  
With every water purchase, some old lace is included!
 
2020-06-24 6:12:42 PM  
I guess the old lace on the label really should have given it away.
 
2020-06-24 6:13:05 PM  

Russ1642: Let's see, 9.56 < 10.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-06-24 6:14:21 PM  

Russ1642: CR recently tested dozens of bottled water brands and found that Starkey Spring Water, introduced by Whole Foods in 2015, had concerning levels of arsenic, ranging from 9.49 to 9.56 parts per billion (PPB), at least three times the level of every other brand tested. Federal regulations require manufacturers to limit the amount of arsenic, a potentially dangerous heavy metal, in bottled water to 10 PPB. CR experts believe that level does not adequately protect public health.

Let's see, 9.56 < 10. They don't even report the uncertainty in the measurements. Consumer Reports, which I'd barely trust to test ballpoint pens, is an expert on levels of arsenic in water. Everything about this is so untrustworthy it's not worth discussing further.


Yum yum yum.  I want my water to have three times the second closest brand's level of arsenic.  It's almost 5% under the maximum governmental limit, so it won't kill me!
 
2020-06-24 6:16:43 PM  

Russ1642: CR recently tested dozens of bottled water brands and found that Starkey Spring Water, introduced by Whole Foods in 2015, had concerning levels of arsenic, ranging from 9.49 to 9.56 parts per billion (PPB), at least three times the level of every other brand tested. Federal regulations require manufacturers to limit the amount of arsenic, a potentially dangerous heavy metal, in bottled water to 10 PPB. CR experts believe that level does not adequately protect public health.

Let's see, 9.56 < 10. They don't even report the uncertainty in the measurements. Consumer Reports, which I'd barely trust to test ballpoint pens, is an expert on levels of arsenic in water. Everything about this is so untrustworthy it's not worth discussing further.


If you're going to cherry pick, don't forget to include this gem from TFA.

But many of the 45 brands of bottled water CR scientists tested between February and May of this year had undetectable amounts of arsenic, demonstrating that lower levels are feasible, says Brian Ronholm, CR's director of food policy and former head of the US Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service. Starkey Spring Water was the only brand CR tested that exceeded 3 PPB.
 
2020-06-24 6:26:42 PM  

Cajnik: Russ1642: CR recently tested dozens of bottled water brands and found that Starkey Spring Water, introduced by Whole Foods in 2015, had concerning levels of arsenic, ranging from 9.49 to 9.56 parts per billion (PPB), at least three times the level of every other brand tested. Federal regulations require manufacturers to limit the amount of arsenic, a potentially dangerous heavy metal, in bottled water to 10 PPB. CR experts believe that level does not adequately protect public health.

Let's see, 9.56 < 10. They don't even report the uncertainty in the measurements. Consumer Reports, which I'd barely trust to test ballpoint pens, is an expert on levels of arsenic in water. Everything about this is so untrustworthy it's not worth discussing further.

If you're going to cherry pick, don't forget to include this gem from TFA.

But many of the 45 brands of bottled water CR scientists tested between February and May of this year had undetectable amounts of arsenic, demonstrating that lower levels are feasible, says Brian Ronholm, CR's director of food policy and former head of the US Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service. Starkey Spring Water was the only brand CR tested that exceeded 3 PPB.


Sorry, are we talking about ballpoint pens here? The whole thing is garbage simply because it's coming from Consumer Reports. I'd sooner base an opinion on something published in The Sun or Daily Mail.
 
2020-06-24 6:29:13 PM  

Russ1642: Cajnik: Russ1642: CR recently tested dozens of bottled water brands and found that Starkey Spring Water, introduced by Whole Foods in 2015, had concerning levels of arsenic, ranging from 9.49 to 9.56 parts per billion (PPB), at least three times the level of every other brand tested. Federal regulations require manufacturers to limit the amount of arsenic, a potentially dangerous heavy metal, in bottled water to 10 PPB. CR experts believe that level does not adequately protect public health.

Let's see, 9.56 < 10. They don't even report the uncertainty in the measurements. Consumer Reports, which I'd barely trust to test ballpoint pens, is an expert on levels of arsenic in water. Everything about this is so untrustworthy it's not worth discussing further.

If you're going to cherry pick, don't forget to include this gem from TFA.

But many of the 45 brands of bottled water CR scientists tested between February and May of this year had undetectable amounts of arsenic, demonstrating that lower levels are feasible, says Brian Ronholm, CR's director of food policy and former head of the US Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service. Starkey Spring Water was the only brand CR tested that exceeded 3 PPB.

Sorry, are we talking about ballpoint pens here? The whole thing is garbage simply because it's coming from Consumer Reports. I'd sooner base an opinion on something published in The Sun or Daily Mail.


What is your problem with CR?  They do good, science-based work.
 
2020-06-24 6:30:30 PM  

Geotpf: Russ1642: Cajnik: Russ1642: CR recently tested dozens of bottled water brands and found that Starkey Spring Water, introduced by Whole Foods in 2015, had concerning levels of arsenic, ranging from 9.49 to 9.56 parts per billion (PPB), at least three times the level of every other brand tested. Federal regulations require manufacturers to limit the amount of arsenic, a potentially dangerous heavy metal, in bottled water to 10 PPB. CR experts believe that level does not adequately protect public health.

Let's see, 9.56 < 10. They don't even report the uncertainty in the measurements. Consumer Reports, which I'd barely trust to test ballpoint pens, is an expert on levels of arsenic in water. Everything about this is so untrustworthy it's not worth discussing further.

If you're going to cherry pick, don't forget to include this gem from TFA.

But many of the 45 brands of bottled water CR scientists tested between February and May of this year had undetectable amounts of arsenic, demonstrating that lower levels are feasible, says Brian Ronholm, CR's director of food policy and former head of the US Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service. Starkey Spring Water was the only brand CR tested that exceeded 3 PPB.

Sorry, are we talking about ballpoint pens here? The whole thing is garbage simply because it's coming from Consumer Reports. I'd sooner base an opinion on something published in The Sun or Daily Mail.

What is your problem with CR?  They do good, science-based work.


They do advertizing masked as objective testing.
 
2020-06-24 6:30:40 PM  
Maybe they could send it to Flint.
 
2020-06-24 6:34:21 PM  

fragMasterFlash: I guess the old lace on the label really should have given it away.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-06-24 6:41:05 PM  
It's not my water.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-06-24 6:51:44 PM  

Russ1642: Geotpf: Russ1642: Cajnik: Russ1642: CR recently tested dozens of bottled water brands and found that Starkey Spring Water, introduced by Whole Foods in 2015, had concerning levels of arsenic, ranging from 9.49 to 9.56 parts per billion (PPB), at least three times the level of every other brand tested. Federal regulations require manufacturers to limit the amount of arsenic, a potentially dangerous heavy metal, in bottled water to 10 PPB. CR experts believe that level does not adequately protect public health.

Let's see, 9.56 < 10. They don't even report the uncertainty in the measurements. Consumer Reports, which I'd barely trust to test ballpoint pens, is an expert on levels of arsenic in water. Everything about this is so untrustworthy it's not worth discussing further.

If you're going to cherry pick, don't forget to include this gem from TFA.

But many of the 45 brands of bottled water CR scientists tested between February and May of this year had undetectable amounts of arsenic, demonstrating that lower levels are feasible, says Brian Ronholm, CR's director of food policy and former head of the US Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service. Starkey Spring Water was the only brand CR tested that exceeded 3 PPB.

Sorry, are we talking about ballpoint pens here? The whole thing is garbage simply because it's coming from Consumer Reports. I'd sooner base an opinion on something published in The Sun or Daily Mail.

What is your problem with CR?  They do good, science-based work.

They do advertizing masked as objective testing.


First I've heard of that. They have their problems, but they're pretty good at insulating themselves from the products they test - no ads in the magazines and they usually buy what they test at retail anonymously. Is there a reason you claim they 'do advertising' when they have zero advertizing revenue? Some under the table scam?
 
2020-06-24 6:57:20 PM  

Russ1642: CR recently tested dozens of bottled water brands and found that Starkey Spring Water, introduced by Whole Foods in 2015, had concerning levels of arsenic, ranging from 9.49 to 9.56 parts per billion (PPB), at least three times the level of every other brand tested. Federal regulations require manufacturers to limit the amount of arsenic, a potentially dangerous heavy metal, in bottled water to 10 PPB. CR experts believe that level does not adequately protect public health.

Let's see, 9.56 < 10. They don't even report the uncertainty in the measurements. Consumer Reports, which I'd barely trust to test ballpoint pens, is an expert on levels of arsenic in water. Everything about this is so untrustworthy it's not worth discussing further.


Which one do you work for; Nestle, Whole Foods, Amazon or Coca-Cola?
 
2020-06-24 6:57:32 PM  
Geotpf:

What is your problem with CR?  They do good, science-based work.

Er, no.  That myth was laid to rest with the Suzuki Samurai "tests".  For those who don't study history, or reporters, here's what happened:

1) Editor is given/bought for very cheap Suzuki Samurai (SS)
2) CR give Suzuki Samuari high ratings.
3) Editor one day spins out on ice covered road, sliding sideways hits a ditch, and flips over.
4) Editor demands that Suzuki give him a new one for free "or else".
5) Suzuki tells editor to stick it.
6) CR then does "tests" to prove the SS is prone to flipping more than other jeep-like vehicles.
7) All the vehicles including the SS pass the test.
8) Editor demands the test gets modified and weights added to raise the center of gravity until the SS will flip.
9) Test is run and re-run only on the SS until it flips.  None of the other vehicles had this modified test performed.
10) CR runs massive "expose" on how unsafe the SS is.
 
2020-06-24 6:57:36 PM  

Surpheon: Russ1642: Geotpf: Russ1642: Cajnik: Russ1642: CR recently tested dozens of bottled water brands and found that Starkey Spring Water, introduced by Whole Foods in 2015, had concerning levels of arsenic, ranging from 9.49 to 9.56 parts per billion (PPB), at least three times the level of every other brand tested. Federal regulations require manufacturers to limit the amount of arsenic, a potentially dangerous heavy metal, in bottled water to 10 PPB. CR experts believe that level does not adequately protect public health.

Let's see, 9.56 < 10. They don't even report the uncertainty in the measurements. Consumer Reports, which I'd barely trust to test ballpoint pens, is an expert on levels of arsenic in water. Everything about this is so untrustworthy it's not worth discussing further.

If you're going to cherry pick, don't forget to include this gem from TFA.

But many of the 45 brands of bottled water CR scientists tested between February and May of this year had undetectable amounts of arsenic, demonstrating that lower levels are feasible, says Brian Ronholm, CR's director of food policy and former head of the US Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service. Starkey Spring Water was the only brand CR tested that exceeded 3 PPB.

Sorry, are we talking about ballpoint pens here? The whole thing is garbage simply because it's coming from Consumer Reports. I'd sooner base an opinion on something published in The Sun or Daily Mail.

What is your problem with CR?  They do good, science-based work.

They do advertizing masked as objective testing.

First I've heard of that. They have their problems, but they're pretty good at insulating themselves from the products they test - no ads in the magazines and they usually buy what they test at retail anonymously. Is there a reason you claim they 'do advertising' when they have zero advertizing revenue? Some under the table scam?


They don't have to run traditional ads because they are bought by the brands that they give high ratings to, those brands then use their ratings to advertise their products
 
2020-06-24 6:57:42 PM  
They'll just rename it Ringo Creek and keep selling it.
 
2020-06-24 7:04:28 PM  

Russ1642: CR recently tested dozens of bottled water brands and found that Starkey Spring Water, introduced by Whole Foods in 2015, had concerning levels of arsenic, ranging from 9.49 to 9.56 parts per billion (PPB), at least three times the level of every other brand tested. Federal regulations require manufacturers to limit the amount of arsenic, a potentially dangerous heavy metal, in bottled water to 10 PPB. CR experts believe that level does not adequately protect public health.

Let's see, 9.56 < 10. They don't even report the uncertainty in the measurements. Consumer Reports, which I'd barely trust to test ballpoint pens, is an expert on levels of arsenic in water. Everything about this is so untrustworthy it's not worth discussing further.


If it's a matter of trust I will have to ask you to prove you actually exist.

Water quality testing however is basic science and is repeatable. Just send samples to multiple labs if you want to confirm the results.
 
2020-06-24 7:04:38 PM  

Avery614: Russ1642: CR recently tested dozens of bottled water brands and found that Starkey Spring Water, introduced by Whole Foods in 2015, had concerning levels of arsenic, ranging from 9.49 to 9.56 parts per billion (PPB), at least three times the level of every other brand tested. Federal regulations require manufacturers to limit the amount of arsenic, a potentially dangerous heavy metal, in bottled water to 10 PPB. CR experts believe that level does not adequately protect public health.

Let's see, 9.56 < 10. They don't even report the uncertainty in the measurements. Consumer Reports, which I'd barely trust to test ballpoint pens, is an expert on levels of arsenic in water. Everything about this is so untrustworthy it's not worth discussing further.

Which one do you work for; Nestle, Whole Foods, Amazon or Coca-Cola?


Don't give a shiat about the water stuff. Just can't stand Consumer Reports. They're just an ad agency.
 
2020-06-24 7:09:58 PM  

AlgaeRancher: Russ1642: CR recently tested dozens of bottled water brands and found that Starkey Spring Water, introduced by Whole Foods in 2015, had concerning levels of arsenic, ranging from 9.49 to 9.56 parts per billion (PPB), at least three times the level of every other brand tested. Federal regulations require manufacturers to limit the amount of arsenic, a potentially dangerous heavy metal, in bottled water to 10 PPB. CR experts believe that level does not adequately protect public health.

Let's see, 9.56 < 10. They don't even report the uncertainty in the measurements. Consumer Reports, which I'd barely trust to test ballpoint pens, is an expert on levels of arsenic in water. Everything about this is so untrustworthy it's not worth discussing further.

If it's a matter of trust I will have to ask you to prove you actually exist.

Water quality testing however is basic science and is repeatable. Just send samples to multiple labs if you want to confirm the results.


Of course. Have a respectable institution publish the same report with the same interpretation and conclusions and it'll have a whole lot more meaning.
 
2020-06-24 7:11:49 PM  

nobody11155: Geotpf:

What is your problem with CR?  They do good, science-based work.

Er, no.  That myth was laid to rest with the Suzuki Samurai "tests".  For those who don't study history, or reporters, here's what happened:

1) Editor is given/bought for very cheap Suzuki Samurai (SS)
2) CR give Suzuki Samuari high ratings.
3) Editor one day spins out on ice covered road, sliding sideways hits a ditch, and flips over.
4) Editor demands that Suzuki give him a new one for free "or else".
5) Suzuki tells editor to stick it.
6) CR then does "tests" to prove the SS is prone to flipping more than other jeep-like vehicles.
7) All the vehicles including the SS pass the test.
8) Editor demands the test gets modified and weights added to raise the center of gravity until the SS will flip.
9) Test is run and re-run only on the SS until it flips.  None of the other vehicles had this modified test performed.
10) CR runs massive "expose" on how unsafe the SS is.


i mean, im not discounting that as some bullshiat from 35 years ago.  but unless they have exactly one editor and its still the same one who pulled that stunt, then chances are the dude was a one off.
 
2020-06-24 7:24:13 PM  

Russ1642: Avery614: Russ1642: CR recently tested dozens of bottled water brands and found that Starkey Spring Water, introduced by Whole Foods in 2015, had concerning levels of arsenic, ranging from 9.49 to 9.56 parts per billion (PPB), at least three times the level of every other brand tested. Federal regulations require manufacturers to limit the amount of arsenic, a potentially dangerous heavy metal, in bottled water to 10 PPB. CR experts believe that level does not adequately protect public health.

Let's see, 9.56 < 10. They don't even report the uncertainty in the measurements. Consumer Reports, which I'd barely trust to test ballpoint pens, is an expert on levels of arsenic in water. Everything about this is so untrustworthy it's not worth discussing further.

Which one do you work for; Nestle, Whole Foods, Amazon or Coca-Cola?

Don't give a shiat about the water stuff. Just can't stand Consumer Reports. They're just an ad agency.


Ah, well then, carry on. I've got no issue with that. I've always viewed them as suspect at best as well but never really researched CR. I also have a deep hatred for "water profiteers" like Nestle & Coca-Cola.

This article reminded me of all their bullsh*t over the last 3 decades and my eye started to twitch.
 
2020-06-24 7:28:08 PM  
Wait till you learn the truth about brown rice.
 
2020-06-24 7:36:47 PM  
No distinction between organic and inorganic arsenic?
I mean ideally it would be neither but only one of those is actually harmful
 
2020-06-24 7:41:44 PM  
I was involved with a group of NIH researchers that advocated arsenic level warning rates of >20 ppb because 1) anything less did not harm people (the Stats showed a curve that ~5 people out of 100 million would get cancer from 10 bbp arsenic, which in reality means zero, as carcinogens generally require a threshold concentration 2) measures to remove arsenic actually created a greater problem with production of high arsenic concentrated waste. 3) people are not as dependent on a single well source, such as in Bangladesh, where arsenic poisoning is endemic.
 
2020-06-24 8:03:23 PM  

169th Cousin: fragMasterFlash: I guess the old lace on the label really should have given it away.

[Fark user image image 250x378]


Really? Nothing?
Obscure?
Old Lace and Gertrude Yorkes?
Slipping Farkers.
 
2020-06-24 8:05:35 PM  

NateAsbestos: No distinction between organic and inorganic arsenic?
I mean ideally it would be neither but only one of those is actually harmful


Mercury is another one where the chemical form is extremely important. You can drink a cup of elemental mercury and shiat it out later and, well, it's not great but not terrible. However, there are organic forms that will kill you if you so much as look at them. And then there's everything in between. It's why you get experts to not only do your testing but to prepare the damn reports and make the public health guidelines. So when someone's telling you something scary about your water supply if you don't see alphabet soup after their name you can probably just ignore them.
 
2020-06-24 8:31:56 PM  
Came here for Ringo. Leaving satisfied.
 
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