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(Fox News)   Food bank receives 33-year-old can of anchovies   (foxnews.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Donation, Giving, food bank, Norwich Foodbank, Food, 33-year-old can of anchovies, donated food item, date of April  
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694 clicks; posted to Food » on 20 Jun 2020 at 9:48 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



33 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-06-20 6:31:41 AM  
Who's got the can opener?
 
2020-06-20 7:01:37 AM  
vignette2.wikia.nocookie.netView Full Size
 
2020-06-20 7:08:21 AM  
I would have at least tried them, and most likely ate them all. Heck the can was airtight and they were packed in liquid.

I have ate much worse fishy smelling things.
 
2020-06-20 8:08:45 AM  
i.gifer.comView Full Size
 
2020-06-20 8:48:57 AM  
Just bought a can of anchovies myself. Along with a ball of mozzarella, pizza dough, stick of pepperoni. Canned pizza sauce...no way I'm making the sauce myself, I'm not that ambitious.

/I sound fat
 
2020-06-20 10:16:44 AM  
Oblig:
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-06-20 10:39:44 AM  
pbs.twimg.comView Full Size
 
2020-06-20 10:42:29 AM  
I volunteered to sort items at a local food bank and it's amazing what people donate.  Everything from those sample packets you get in the mail to an unbelievable assortment of cock rings.  I think people just empty out their junk drawer.
 
2020-06-20 10:51:16 AM  
Make Worcestershire sauce
 
2020-06-20 11:02:24 AM  
The Olsen Twins are 34 years old a piece.
 
2020-06-20 11:20:16 AM  
I only get the fancy stuff

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-06-20 11:28:12 AM  
So, worth just as much as when they were canned.  Unless Mom's Robot Oil comes along.
 
2020-06-20 1:57:12 PM  
could be worse could have been 33 year old canned stromming.   Mind the tin may have aslpoded before then.
 
2020-06-20 1:59:24 PM  
thumbs.gfycat.comView Full Size
 
2020-06-20 2:24:13 PM  

TAOCHOW: I would have at least tried them, and most likely ate them all. Heck the can was airtight and they were packed in liquid.

I have ate much worse fishy smelling things.


Surstromming?
 
2020-06-20 3:57:10 PM  
Give it to Steve1989.  He'll eat anything!
 
2020-06-20 5:54:59 PM  
I always thought turmeric was just for color and had no taste until I noticed the date on the jar I was using - 1991. I guess I should go through the kitchen cupboards and throw out anything more than two years old.
 
2020-06-20 6:39:24 PM  

bababa: I always thought turmeric was just for color and had no taste until I noticed the date on the jar I was using - 1991. I guess I should go through the kitchen cupboards and throw out anything more than two years old.


Two decades. At very least.
 
2020-06-20 11:13:43 PM  
I volunteer at a food bank twice a week. We do get some crap, but that's expected. If you haven't eaten it in three years, why should someone else? But what makes me laugh is the expensive ingredients we get sometimes. Like three cans of San Marzano tomatoes in a box of otherwise ramen. Or really good smoked salmon or pricey cooking oils. Thanks Cooking Channel for making Millennials think they could cook if they just bought everything at Whole Foods.
 
2020-06-20 11:36:06 PM  

slobberbone: I volunteer at a food bank twice a week. We do get some crap, but that's expected. If you haven't eaten it in three years, why should someone else? But what makes me laugh is the expensive ingredients we get sometimes. Like three cans of San Marzano tomatoes in a box of otherwise ramen. Or really good smoked salmon or pricey cooking oils. Thanks Cooking Channel for making Millennials think they could cook if they just bought everything at Whole Foods.


Yep. It's the foodie equivalent of middle-class suburban househerrs buying expensive, top-of-the-line tools and equipment from Home Depot, only to have it slowly become useless through misuse as they make shop-class-nightmare "furniture" at home, then selling them on Craigslist for pennies on the dollar after a few years.
 
2020-06-20 11:36:52 PM  
Heck, I'd coin "Rockler Ranger" for those schmucks, at least when it comes to woodworking.
 
2020-06-21 3:02:32 AM  
Not my fault. They said they were already well-stocked with Creamed Eel and Ham Nog.
/I'm keeping the swollen can of pumpkin pie filling, may need that
 
2020-06-21 9:20:54 AM  

FormlessOne: slobberbone: I volunteer at a food bank twice a week. We do get some crap, but that's expected. If you haven't eaten it in three years, why should someone else? But what makes me laugh is the expensive ingredients we get sometimes. Like three cans of San Marzano tomatoes in a box of otherwise ramen. Or really good smoked salmon or pricey cooking oils. Thanks Cooking Channel for making Millennials think they could cook if they just bought everything at Whole Foods.

Yep. It's the foodie equivalent of middle-class suburban househerrs buying expensive, top-of-the-line tools and equipment from Home Depot, only to have it slowly become useless through misuse as they make shop-class-nightmare "furniture" at home, then selling them on Craigslist for pennies on the dollar after a few years.


I have watched Craigslist for a lot of years, but have only rarely found any good deals. People that take care of their tools (and are only selling them because they have stepped up a grade) know what they are worth. People that don't take care of them, or have "inherited" them, are generally selling junk. I just gave up and buy what I want, new, and take care of them. I'm still a wood butcher, but I can't blame the tools. I think the only used tool I bought was a jointer, and it took so much time to make it right I should have just bought a new one. It was a lesson learned the hard way.
 
2020-06-21 9:55:07 AM  

Al Tsheimers: I have watched Craigslist for a lot of years, but have only rarely found any good deals. People that take care of their tools (and are only selling them because they have stepped up a grade) know what they are worth. People that don't take care of them, or have "inherited" them, are generally selling junk. I just gave up and buy what I want, new, and take care of them. I'm still a wood butcher, but I can't blame the tools. I think the only used tool I bought was a jointer, and it took so much time to make it right I should have just bought a new one. It was a lesson learned the hard way.


But the tools are "really nice and I paid a lot for it when I bought them." Kind of like the six-year-old PC mom complains about on every call is "slow."
 
2020-06-21 9:59:55 AM  
was the can swollen or leaking? then they are ok... I mean I'd throw them away because they are anchovies.
 
2020-06-21 10:18:57 AM  

slobberbone: Al Tsheimers: I have watched Craigslist for a lot of years, but have only rarely found any good deals. People that take care of their tools (and are only selling them because they have stepped up a grade) know what they are worth. People that don't take care of them, or have "inherited" them, are generally selling junk. I just gave up and buy what I want, new, and take care of them. I'm still a wood butcher, but I can't blame the tools. I think the only used tool I bought was a jointer, and it took so much time to make it right I should have just bought a new one. It was a lesson learned the hard way.

But the tools are "really nice and I paid a lot for it when I bought them." Kind of like the six-year-old PC mom complains about on every call is "slow."


The jointer was a train wreck when I bought it, but it was nearly free, and had obviously not been used in years, and probably never by the guy selling it. He had the fence mounted upside down. But the motor worked, and in the dark I didn't see what else needed to be fixed. Which was a lot. Stripping it down and shimming the ways. Remove rust and repaint several fence pieces. Replace v-belt with a link belt, etc.
 
2020-06-21 10:28:59 AM  

Al Tsheimers: The jointer was a train wreck when I bought it, but it was nearly free, and had obviously not been used in years, and probably never by the guy selling it. He had the fence mounted upside down. But the motor worked, and in the dark I didn't see what else needed to be fixed. Which was a lot. Stripping it down and shimming the ways. Remove rust and repaint several fence pieces. Replace v-belt with a link belt, etc.


Yer fine. I was talking in general about people's stupid attachment to shiat as if it is a family heirloom. And pricing accordingly.
 
2020-06-21 10:46:51 AM  

slobberbone: Al Tsheimers: The jointer was a train wreck when I bought it, but it was nearly free, and had obviously not been used in years, and probably never by the guy selling it. He had the fence mounted upside down. But the motor worked, and in the dark I didn't see what else needed to be fixed. Which was a lot. Stripping it down and shimming the ways. Remove rust and repaint several fence pieces. Replace v-belt with a link belt, etc.

Yer fine. I was talking in general about people's stupid attachment to shiat as if it is a family heirloom. And pricing accordingly.


I agree with your assessment. I have tried to deal with people that have no idea what they are selling, or how to use it, but they looked it up on the internet, found the going price for a new item, and think they should get 10% less because it was used.
 
2020-06-21 11:05:55 AM  

theflinx: was the can swollen or leaking? then they are ok... I mean I'd throw them away because they are anchovies.


Yes. You don't like anchovies. That is the point.
 
2020-06-21 3:41:57 PM  

Al Tsheimers: FormlessOne: slobberbone: I volunteer at a food bank twice a week. We do get some crap, but that's expected. If you haven't eaten it in three years, why should someone else? But what makes me laugh is the expensive ingredients we get sometimes. Like three cans of San Marzano tomatoes in a box of otherwise ramen. Or really good smoked salmon or pricey cooking oils. Thanks Cooking Channel for making Millennials think they could cook if they just bought everything at Whole Foods.

Yep. It's the foodie equivalent of middle-class suburban househerrs buying expensive, top-of-the-line tools and equipment from Home Depot, only to have it slowly become useless through misuse as they make shop-class-nightmare "furniture" at home, then selling them on Craigslist for pennies on the dollar after a few years.

I have watched Craigslist for a lot of years, but have only rarely found any good deals. People that take care of their tools (and are only selling them because they have stepped up a grade) know what they are worth. People that don't take care of them, or have "inherited" them, are generally selling junk. I just gave up and buy what I want, new, and take care of them. I'm still a wood butcher, but I can't blame the tools. I think the only used tool I bought was a jointer, and it took so much time to make it right I should have just bought a new one. It was a lesson learned the hard way.



Totally agree, except oftentimes, buying new isn't an option.

Do I get a lawn tractor used for $350, or a new one for $3500?
 
2020-06-21 3:58:09 PM  

SoundOfOneHandWanking: Totally agree, except oftentimes, buying new isn't an option.

Do I get a lawn tractor used for $350, or a new one for $3500?


Realize you need to live on a compound and get boostrappy.

Or move to a one-bedroom apartment and reconsider your purchase plan.

I mean, it's your money. 

Username totally checks.
 
2020-06-21 5:01:07 PM  

Al Tsheimers: FormlessOne: slobberbone: I volunteer at a food bank twice a week. We do get some crap, but that's expected. If you haven't eaten it in three years, why should someone else? But what makes me laugh is the expensive ingredients we get sometimes. Like three cans of San Marzano tomatoes in a box of otherwise ramen. Or really good smoked salmon or pricey cooking oils. Thanks Cooking Channel for making Millennials think they could cook if they just bought everything at Whole Foods.

Yep. It's the foodie equivalent of middle-class suburban househerrs buying expensive, top-of-the-line tools and equipment from Home Depot, only to have it slowly become useless through misuse as they make shop-class-nightmare "furniture" at home, then selling them on Craigslist for pennies on the dollar after a few years.

I have watched Craigslist for a lot of years, but have only rarely found any good deals. People that take care of their tools (and are only selling them because they have stepped up a grade) know what they are worth. People that don't take care of them, or have "inherited" them, are generally selling junk. I just gave up and buy what I want, new, and take care of them. I'm still a wood butcher, but I can't blame the tools. I think the only used tool I bought was a jointer, and it took so much time to make it right I should have just bought a new one. It was a lesson learned the hard way.


I never buy power tools on Craigslist for that very reason, but I sometimes buy hand tools, especially if they're high-quality tools that are being sold because they're "rusty" or neglected, but otherwise intact.

I have a few leatherworking tools, including a C.S. Osborne #55, purchased for pennies on the dollar from Craigslist. I've picked up about $400-500 worth of high-end leatherworking & woodworking tools for probably less than a tenth of that price, then spent a bit of time restoring them for my use.
 
2020-06-21 5:03:25 PM  

Al Tsheimers: slobberbone: Al Tsheimers: I have watched Craigslist for a lot of years, but have only rarely found any good deals. People that take care of their tools (and are only selling them because they have stepped up a grade) know what they are worth. People that don't take care of them, or have "inherited" them, are generally selling junk. I just gave up and buy what I want, new, and take care of them. I'm still a wood butcher, but I can't blame the tools. I think the only used tool I bought was a jointer, and it took so much time to make it right I should have just bought a new one. It was a lesson learned the hard way.

But the tools are "really nice and I paid a lot for it when I bought them." Kind of like the six-year-old PC mom complains about on every call is "slow."

The jointer was a train wreck when I bought it, but it was nearly free, and had obviously not been used in years, and probably never by the guy selling it. He had the fence mounted upside down. But the motor worked, and in the dark I didn't see what else needed to be fixed. Which was a lot. Stripping it down and shimming the ways. Remove rust and repaint several fence pieces. Replace v-belt with a link belt, etc.


Yep, exactly - if I can restore a high-end tool, I'm happy to buy it & put in a bit of sweat equity to reap the benefits.

It's a crime to me to buy such tools and not use them. I feel like I'm performing a public service, a redemptive one, when I restore a tool to a proper, usable state, then use it to make something for someone else.
 
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