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(Forbes)   If an unexpected signal goes "bump" in a dark matter experiment, does that mean we've found dark matter?   (forbes.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Dark matter, Standard Model, Particle physics, international XENON collaboration, Neutrino, evidence of a mysterious particle, sensitive dark matter detector, XENON collaboration  
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760 clicks; posted to Geek » on 17 Jun 2020 at 4:18 PM (13 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



17 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-06-17 10:49:22 AM  
Although the most highly anticipated signals were expected to occur in the ~GeV range of energies (where 1 GeV corresponds to 1 billion electron-volts),


Its great that you explained the G in GeV is billion, but WTF is an electron-volt?
 
2020-06-17 2:52:23 PM  
I'm pretty sure Watterson et al. established that scientific progress goes "Boink".
 
2020-06-17 4:27:17 PM  

croesius: I'm pretty sure Watterson et al. established that scientific progress goes "Boink".


Frequently accompanied by either "aww shiat" or "that's weird."
 
2020-06-17 4:44:20 PM  
No, it means weeks of going over papers full of data and doing computer simulations to try and figure it out.


Wow, that took me 21 words to correctly answer that question. What kind of 4th rate hack needs over 1000 words to answer the same thing?
 
2020-06-17 4:46:55 PM  

lifeslammer: No, it means weeks of going over papers full of data and doing computer simulations to try and figure it out.


Wow, that took me 21 words to correctly answer that question. What kind of 4th rate hack needs over 1000 words to answer the same thing?


Forbes. Paid by the word.

/ But since it's Forbes it's like a half-penny per word and a Conservative lecture each paragraph.
 
2020-06-17 4:56:51 PM  

SoundOfOneHandWanking: Although the most highly anticipated signals were expected to occur in the ~GeV range of energies (where 1 GeV corresponds to 1 billion electron-volts),


Its great that you explained the G in GeV is billion, but WTF is an electron-volt?


It's approximately 1/3rd of purple.
 
2020-06-17 5:26:38 PM  
a surprising signal has emerged above the expected background in an unexpected place: at low, rather than high, energies.

It's repeatable. Pull my finger.
 
2020-06-17 5:30:17 PM  

Martian_Astronomer: SoundOfOneHandWanking: Although the most highly anticipated signals were expected to occur in the ~GeV range of energies (where 1 GeV corresponds to 1 billion electron-volts),


Its great that you explained the G in GeV is billion, but WTF is an electron-volt?

It's approximately 1/3rd of purple.


I'm pretty sure that's love, isn't it?
 
2020-06-17 5:47:54 PM  

SoundOfOneHandWanking: Although the most highly anticipated signals were expected to occur in the ~GeV range of energies (where 1 GeV corresponds to 1 billion electron-volts),


Its great that you explained the G in GeV is billion, but WTF is an electron-volt?


The amount of energy to raise or lower the voltage of an electron by 1.
 
2020-06-17 5:52:47 PM  
Fark user image
 
2020-06-17 6:03:16 PM  

SoundOfOneHandWanking: Although the most highly anticipated signals were expected to occur in the ~GeV range of energies (where 1 GeV corresponds to 1 billion electron-volts),


Its great that you explained the G in GeV is billion, but WTF is an electron-volt?


About a billionth of a Gigaelectron-volt.
 
2020-06-17 6:03:41 PM  

SoundOfOneHandWanking: Although the most highly anticipated signals were expected to occur in the ~GeV range of energies (where 1 GeV corresponds to 1 billion electron-volts),


Its great that you explained the G in GeV is billion, but WTF is an electron-volt?


Pretty sure it's one of those fancy new electric cars.
 
2020-06-17 6:44:53 PM  

SoundOfOneHandWanking: Although the most highly anticipated signals were expected to occur in the ~GeV range of energies (where 1 GeV corresponds to 1 billion electron-volts),


Its great that you explained the G in GeV is billion, but WTF is an electron-volt?


Your mom's "massager" that takes a couple pallets worth of batteries.
 
2020-06-17 7:47:59 PM  

covfefe: SoundOfOneHandWanking: Although the most highly anticipated signals were expected to occur in the ~GeV range of energies (where 1 GeV corresponds to 1 billion electron-volts),


Its great that you explained the G in GeV is billion, but WTF is an electron-volt?

The amount of energy to raise or lower the voltage of an electron by 1.


Technically it's the amount of energy needed to move an electron over a one volt potential barrier (or the energy gained going the other way) which is admittedly a very pedantic difference but I think it's a little more clear
 
2020-06-17 7:59:08 PM  

New Farkin User Name: covfefe: SoundOfOneHandWanking: Although the most highly anticipated signals were expected to occur in the ~GeV range of energies (where 1 GeV corresponds to 1 billion electron-volts),


Its great that you explained the G in GeV is billion, but WTF is an electron-volt?

The amount of energy to raise or lower the voltage of an electron by 1.

Technically it's the amount of energy needed to move an electron over a one volt potential barrier (or the energy gained going the other way) which is admittedly a very pedantic difference but I think it's a little more clear


I think if you need to understand electric fields and kinetics, it's harder. Why would anyone accelerate an electron anyway? It's not a car.
 
2020-06-17 8:13:38 PM  

covfefe: New Farkin User Name: covfefe: SoundOfOneHandWanking: Although the most highly anticipated signals were expected to occur in the ~GeV range of energies (where 1 GeV corresponds to 1 billion electron-volts),


Its great that you explained the G in GeV is billion, but WTF is an electron-volt?

The amount of energy to raise or lower the voltage of an electron by 1.

Technically it's the amount of energy needed to move an electron over a one volt potential barrier (or the energy gained going the other way) which is admittedly a very pedantic difference but I think it's a little more clear

I think if you need to understand electric fields and kinetics, it's harder. Why would anyone accelerate an electron anyway? It's not a car.


I totally would.
 
2020-06-18 10:45:38 AM  
Yes, with a but, no, with a maybe.
 
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