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(ArtNet)   It doesn't belong in a museum   (news.artnet.com) divider line
    More: Fake, Archaeology, Eliseo Gil, Roman world, Roman Empire, lead police officer, Spanish language, Basque language, Roman town  
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1558 clicks; posted to Geek » on 15 Jun 2020 at 2:50 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



29 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-06-14 11:33:15 PM  
Wait, what?  How was this guy celebrated for anything, or taken seriously in the first place?  Those fakes are comically fake, and the list of mistakes cited in TFA is practically a Monty Python sketch.

He inscribed "Jupiter" with a J.  He put "RIP" on the drawing of the cross.  In a linked article, it's pointed out that the the fake inscriptions included references to Queen Nefertiti and Rene Descartes, which would require the 3rd century Basques to be time-traveling Egyptologists.   Did they call Cardinal Richelieu to the stand during the trial?
 
2020-06-14 11:53:25 PM  

Xcott: Wait, what?  How was this guy celebrated for anything, or taken seriously in the first place?  Those fakes are comically fake, and the list of mistakes cited in TFA is practically a Monty Python sketch.

He inscribed "Jupiter" with a J.  He put "RIP" on the drawing of the cross.  In a linked article, it's pointed out that the the fake inscriptions included references to Queen Nefertiti and Rene Descartes, which would require the 3rd century Basques to be time-traveling Egyptologists.   Did they call Cardinal Richelieu to the stand during the trial?


And it took the 12 years to finally figure this out?
 
2020-06-14 11:55:38 PM  
Wrong crosses. That is not how they made them in that place or that time.

A Saint Andrew's cross a a common T cross would have been so easy to fake--but not as convincing for the moroni of Spain.
 
2020-06-14 11:56:53 PM  
You remember the brilliant mathematician who bought fake letters written by famous people from Ancient Times, including Jesus?

They were written in English, as I recall, or possibly French.
 
2020-06-15 12:01:32 AM  
I mean yeah fark that guy... Buy creating fake antiquities is a crime?
 
2020-06-15 12:35:45 AM  

NateAsbestos: I mean yeah fark that guy... Buy creating fake antiquities is a crime?


"The court ordered the men to pay the local government which funded the archaeological dig €12,500 ($14,000)."
 
2020-06-15 12:38:38 AM  
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2020-06-15 2:58:17 AM  
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2020-06-15 3:08:16 AM  
Wanted for questioning:

imgix.bustle.comView Full Size
 
2020-06-15 3:18:07 AM  
Benevolent Misanthrope:
And it took the 12 years to finally figure this out?

"Today, however, Gil is facing criminal charges in three courts for fraud and attacks on national heritage" autumn 2009
 
2020-06-15 3:19:50 AM  

Xcott: Wait, what?  How was this guy celebrated for anything, or taken seriously in the first place?  Those fakes are comically fake, and the list of mistakes cited in TFA is practically a Monty Python sketch.

He inscribed "Jupiter" with a J.  He put "RIP" on the drawing of the cross.  In a linked article, it's pointed out that the the fake inscriptions included references to Queen Nefertiti and Rene Descartes, which would require the 3rd century Basques to be time-traveling Egyptologists.   Did they call Cardinal Richelieu to the stand during the trial?


I am curious what the reference to Descartes is, none of the linked articles was more specific.  I'm guessing the schmuck tried to be cute and scratched "cogito ergo sum" somewhere.
 
2020-06-15 3:20:41 AM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Xcott: Wait, what?  How was this guy celebrated for anything, or taken seriously in the first place?  Those fakes are comically fake, and the list of mistakes cited in TFA is practically a Monty Python sketch.

He inscribed "Jupiter" with a J.  He put "RIP" on the drawing of the cross.  In a linked article, it's pointed out that the the fake inscriptions included references to Queen Nefertiti and Rene Descartes, which would require the 3rd century Basques to be time-traveling Egyptologists.   Did they call Cardinal Richelieu to the stand during the trial?

And it took the 12 years to finally figure this out?


It's Spain.  They probably napped though half of it.
 
2020-06-15 4:47:48 AM  
Paleoanthropology Division
Smithsonian Institute
207 Pennsylvania Avenue
Washington, DC 20078
Dear Sir:
Thank you for your latest submission to the Institute, labeled "211-D, layer seven, next to the clothesline post. Hominid skull." We have given this specimen a careful and detailed examination, and regret to inform you that we disagree with your theory that it represents "conclusive proof of the presence of Early Man in Charleston County two million years ago." Rather, it appears that what you have found is the head of a Barbie doll, of the variety one of our staff, who has small children, believes to be the "Malibu Barbie". It is evident that you have given a great deal of thought to the analysis of this specimen, and you may be quite certain that those of us who are familiar with your prior work in the field were loathe to come to contradiction with your findings. However, we do feel that there are a number of physical attributes of the specimen which might have tipped you off to it's modern origin:

1. The material is molded plastic. Ancient hominid remains are typically fossilized bone.

2. The cranial capacity of the specimen is approximately 9 cubic centimeters, well below the threshold of even the earliest identified proto-hominids.

3. The dentition pattern evident on the "skull" is more consistent with the common domesticated dog than it is with the "ravenous man-eating Pliocene clams" you speculate roamed the wetlands during that time. This latter finding is certainly one of the most intriguing hypotheses you have submitted in your history with this institution, but the evidence seems to weigh rather heavily against it. Without going into too much detail, let us say that:

A. The specimen looks like the head of a Barbie doll that a dog has chewed on.
B. Clams don't have teeth.

It is with feelings tinged with melancholy that we must deny your request to have the specimen carbon dated. This is partially due to the heavy load our lab must bear in it's normal operation, and partly due to carbon dating's notorious inaccuracy in fossils of recent geologic record. To the best of our knowledge, no Barbie dolls were produced prior to 1956 AD, and carbon dating is likely to produce wildly inaccurate results. Sadly, we must also deny your request that we approach the National Science Foundation's Phylogeny Department with the concept of assigning your specimen the scientific name "Australopithecus spiff-arino." Speaking personally, I, for one, fought tenaciously for the acceptance of your proposed taxonomy, but was ultimately voted down because the species name you selected was hyphenated, and didn't really sound like it might be Latin.
However, we gladly accept your generous donation of this fascinating specimen to the museum. While it is undoubtedly not a hominid fossil, it is, nonetheless, yet another riveting example of the great body of work you seem to accumulate here so effortlessly. You should know that our Director has reserved a special shelf in his own office for the display of the specimens you have previously submitted to the Institution, and the entire staff speculates daily on what you will happen upon next in your digs at the site you have discovered in your back yard. We eagerly anticipate your trip to our nation's capital that you proposed in your last letter, and several of us are pressing the Director to pay for it. We are particularly interested in hearing you expand on your theories surrounding the "trans-positating fillifitation of ferrous ions in a structural matrix" that makes the excellent juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex femur you recently discovered take on the deceptive appearance of a rusty 9-mm Sears Craftsman automotive crescent wrench.
Yours in Science,
Harvey Rowe
Curator, Antiquities
 
2020-06-15 4:48:44 AM  
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2020-06-15 5:13:49 AM  
Professor Henry Jones: But in the Latin alphabet, "Jehovah" begins with an "I".
 
2020-06-15 5:18:24 AM  
Banksy did it better.
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2020-06-15 5:51:32 AM  
I'm just glad they nailed the guy
 
2020-06-15 6:24:00 AM  
You do of course realize that "Elisio Gil" is an anagram of "IS LOG, I LIE", right?
 
2020-06-15 6:34:34 AM  

NateAsbestos: I mean yeah fark that guy... Buy creating fake antiquities is a crime?


He vandalized real antiquities in order to create the fakes.  It wasn't a matter of forging from scratch, rather he was 'upgrading' boring antiquities by inscribing stuff on them to make them more interesting.
 
2020-06-15 6:45:05 AM  
Nah, I'm sure there's a museum for archeological forgeries out there somewhere.
 
2020-06-15 7:11:11 AM  
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2020-06-15 7:11:49 AM  
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Looks  like sandpaper and puffy paint to me.
 
2020-06-15 8:25:45 AM  
Crucifiction
 
2020-06-15 8:40:46 AM  

brantgoose: You remember the brilliant mathematician who bought fake letters written by famous people from Ancient Times, including Jesus?

They were written in English, as I recall, or possibly French.


French. He was turned in 18 years after the first sale, when the dupe finally became suspicious.
 
2020-06-15 8:41:05 AM  

dittybopper: You do of course realize that "Elisio Gil" is an anagram of "IS LOG, I LIE", right?


Not in Spanish, it's not.
 
2020-06-15 8:48:27 AM  

seelorq: NateAsbestos: I mean yeah fark that guy... Buy creating fake antiquities is a crime?

"The court ordered the men to pay the local government which funded the archaeological dig €12,500 ($14,000)."


And 2 years 3 months in prison for one guy. Seems a little harsh.
 
2020-06-15 10:44:16 AM  

Vlad_the_Inaner: Crucifiction


It's a doddle !
 
2020-06-15 11:30:37 AM  

Earguy: [news.artnet.com image 537x600]

Looks  like sandpaper and puffy paint to me.


Which is funny because the pottery is absolutely genuine 2k year-old Roman pottery, just with modern graffiti.
 
2020-06-15 12:52:13 PM  
I am actually more interested in WHO fell for this BS??  Like, oh here is pottery from 200 BC?  Oh, they liked AC/DC and RATT too?  how interesting?

Like some who fell for it should be in much hotter water!
 
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