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(Axios)   Zoom bows and scrapes for its masters   (axios.com) divider line
    More: Asinine, Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, U.S. video-conferencing company Zoom, Zoom event, account of a group of prominent U.S., Tiananmen Square, Chinese activists, Zhou Fengsuo, popular meeting software  
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701 clicks; posted to Business » on 11 Jun 2020 at 3:41 AM (19 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-06-11 4:07:14 AM  
When a meeting is held across different countries, the participants within those countries are required to comply with their respective local laws.

i forget which country it was or why, but in one of our meetings we had to throw our it guy into a volcano
 
2020-06-11 5:40:26 AM  

crinz83: When a meeting is held across different countries, the participants within those countries are required to comply with their respective local laws.

i forget which country it was or why, but in one of our meetings we had to throw our it guy into a volcano


oh I remember that. the funniest part he never dropped his bagel. I damn near choked laughing.
 
2020-06-11 8:54:01 AM  
This is the kind of "soft power" that China flexes behind the scenes.

Here is another example:

https://techcrunch.com/2020/05/26/you​t​ube-china-comments-wumao-dang/

Obviously the PRC somehow manipulated the YouTube moderated AI to get it to instantly (well, within 15 seconds) delete any comment that contained certain terms the Chinese Communist Party doesn't like.

Is this what you want?  American media platforms censoring things at the behest of a foreign totalitarian state?

It's even happening here.  If you string together the words "Wuhan" and "virus", the Fark filter will turn them into "COVID-19", like it was the N-word or some other really offensive term.   I've been told it's "because racism", but Wuhan isn't a race, it's a city.

When you start going from censoring really offensive things like anagrams of ginger, to censoring terms that are actually neutral but that The Communist Party of the People's Republic of China decide are racist because it reminds people that Beijing lied about it and suppressed information about it.

Maybe "Winnie the Flu" really is a better term.
 
2020-06-11 9:13:37 AM  
 
2020-06-11 9:53:53 AM  

dittybopper: This is the kind of "soft power" that China flexes behind the scenes.

Here is another example:

https://techcrunch.com/2020/05/26/yout​ube-china-comments-wumao-dang/

Obviously the PRC somehow manipulated the YouTube moderated AI to get it to instantly (well, within 15 seconds) delete any comment that contained certain terms the Chinese Communist Party doesn't like.

Is this what you want?  American media platforms censoring things at the behest of a foreign totalitarian state?

It's even happening here.  If you string together the words "Wuhan" and "virus", the Fark filter will turn them into "COVID-19", like it was the N-word or some other really offensive term.   I've been told it's "because racism", but Wuhan isn't a race, it's a city.

When you start going from censoring really offensive things like anagrams of ginger, to censoring terms that are actually neutral but that The Communist Party of the People's Republic of China decide are racist because it reminds people that Beijing lied about it and suppressed information about it.

Maybe "Winnie the Flu" really is a better term.


Great, now I have the Winnie the Pooh song stick in my head but with your flu version.  And knowing my head, I'll be thinking of alternate verses that fit.  Thanks for that.
 
2020-06-11 9:59:38 AM  

Opacity: Here's a few more examples:
Marriott fires an hourly grunt in Omaha, NE for liking a tweet that pissed off China

Airlines have to hide the country "Taiwan" as a flights destination, only show the destination as Taipei


Oh, and let us not forget things like having MGM change the "bad guys" in the 2012 version of "Red Dawn" from Chinese to North Korean.  Not like China was going to allow the film in China, but the studio would have gotten a black mark for it and not be allowed access to the Chinese market.

And in fact it's become far more prevalent.  Major studios are not going to make a film that pisses off the Chinese Communist Party.

Remember back in the 1990's when you'd see films from major studios like Red Corner, Seven Years In Tibet, and Kundun?  Unless things change, you will never see another film like that.  Remember when Hollywood was all about justice for Tibet?  Not any more.  And they're not going to touch on the supression of the Uighurs in Xinjiang province with a ten foot pole.  A million people run through concentration camps for "re-education", based solely on their religion, and no major studio will ever make a film about it because they don't want to be blacklisted from China.
 
2020-06-11 10:05:11 AM  

zeroflight222: Great, now I have the Winnie the Pooh song stick in my head but with your flu version.  And knowing my head, I'll be thinking of alternate verses that fit.  Thanks for that.


没办法
 
2020-06-11 10:43:53 AM  
Capitalism and democracy are not synonymous
 
2020-06-11 8:22:03 PM  
"It's a fairly easy equation.  If you want the Chinese government to have all your shiat, use Zoom."*


*people are saying  <-- libel protection label
 
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