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(Poynter Institute)   And the hits keep coming: A glass shortage could be a huge problem for distributing a COVID-19 vaccine   (poynter.org) divider line
    More: Followup, Unemployment, NAIRU, May unemployment rate, solid waste, doses of a COVID-19 vaccine, way of people, face shields, May figures  
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2238 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Jun 2020 at 8:32 PM (19 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

 
2020-06-08 10:29:42 PM  
10 votes:

Prof. Frink: There is water
At the bottom of the ocean.


The ocean is a desert with its life underground
And a perfect disguise above
 
2020-06-08 8:36:17 PM  
10 votes:
Why didn't they realize that they were going to run out of food in the winter?

This is the question the children of survivors of the American Perdition will be asking a hundred years from now.
 
2020-06-08 8:41:24 PM  
9 votes:

bd1709h9t: Well this is weird.  The city in which I reside has for years had recycling that has included plastics, aluminum and glass.  Two months ago, we received notice that glass would no longer be accepted for recycling due to "difficult economic realities."  Aluminum cans, plastic and whatnot still recyclable.  Not glass.  WTF ?


It's not as cost effective to recycle glass
 
2020-06-08 8:39:47 PM  
9 votes:
Well this is weird.  The city in which I reside has for years had recycling that has included plastics, aluminum and glass.  Two months ago, we received notice that glass would no longer be accepted for recycling due to "difficult economic realities."  Aluminum cans, plastic and whatnot still recyclable.  Not glass.  WTF ?
 
2020-06-08 9:04:32 PM  
8 votes:

GrogSmash: Ivo Shandor: erik-k: I mentioned this to dad when I first saw it in my news feed a while ago and got ever the engineer's response: "why can't they use plastic?"

Another approach would be to send out the first batch, then collect the empties and re-fill them as needed. If they could do it for milk bottles a hundred years ago, they can figure out a way to do it for vaccines in 2020. Put a $10 deposit on each bottle if people need an incentive beyond saving lives.

I suspect there is a giant raft of sterility issues with that particular plan.

Crap ike this is generally treated in a 'clean room' manner.


Glass can be heated to a temperature which will take care of any biological contamination, and/or washed with chemicals to accomplish the same goal.
 
2020-06-08 8:42:35 PM  
8 votes:
thesaurus.plusView Full Size
 
2020-06-08 8:40:38 PM  
7 votes:
media.gettyimages.comView Full Size


get in line, Private.
 
2020-06-08 9:27:49 PM  
6 votes:

Tad_Waxpole: [thesaurus.plus image 650x400]


For years I've warned that people might describe Cassandra as a fear monger irather than a prophetess telling people the actual truth, but alas, no one listened.
 
2020-06-08 9:11:15 PM  
5 votes:
 
2020-06-08 9:04:07 PM  
5 votes:
Glass? Who gives a shit about glass?
Youtube rxEAxH2nx9k
 
2020-06-08 8:56:08 PM  
5 votes:

erik-k: I mentioned this to dad when I first saw it in my news feed a while ago and got ever the engineer's response: "why can't they use plastic?"


Another approach would be to send out the first batch, then collect the empties and re-fill them as needed. If they could do it for milk bottles a hundred years ago, they can figure out a way to do it for vaccines in 2020. Put a $10 deposit on each bottle if people need an incentive beyond saving lives.
 
2020-06-08 8:44:02 PM  
5 votes:

AcneVulgaris: There are 7 BILLION of us, FFS, and we can't make some glass?


The manufacturing capacity to make 2 billion single dose vials isn't there.

Fortunately the 'scienticians' remembered that you can use containers that hold 5, 10, 25, 100, or even thousands of doses, making this a non-issue
 
2020-06-08 9:48:18 PM  
4 votes:
Given the historical success rate of developing corona virus vaccines I'd say subby has nothing to worry about.
 
2020-06-08 9:19:04 PM  
4 votes:

Smirky the Wonder Chimp: Other than enraged people, morons and sickness, is there ANYTHING we have in ample smounts?


Assholes
 
2020-06-08 9:17:19 PM  
4 votes:
Other than enraged people, morons and sickness, is there ANYTHING we have in ample smounts?
 
2020-06-08 8:51:41 PM  
4 votes:

bd1709h9t: Well this is weird.  The city in which I reside has for years had recycling that has included plastics, aluminum and glass.  Two months ago, we received notice that glass would no longer be accepted for recycling due to "difficult economic realities."  Aluminum cans, plastic and whatnot still recyclable.  Not glass.  WTF ?


Glass is just melted sand.  There really isn't much of an energy benefit to reusing glass vs sand (as opposed to mining tons of earth to get a pound of aluminum).
Glass is heavy, so it is more expensive to ship than to just build a glass plant next to where sand comes from.
There isn't a great way to sort clear glass from colored glass, so it is easily contaminated.
 
2020-06-08 8:47:30 PM  
4 votes:
I mentioned this to dad when I first saw it in my news feed a while ago and got ever the engineer's response: "why can't they use plastic?"
 
2020-06-08 8:42:25 PM  
4 votes:
"The challenge is not so much to make the vaccine itself, it's to fill vials," said Pascal Soriot, CEO of AstraZeneca

media.giphy.comView Full Size
 
2020-06-08 10:28:58 PM  
3 votes:

RogermcAllen: bd1709h9t: Well this is weird.  The city in which I reside has for years had recycling that has included plastics, aluminum and glass.  Two months ago, we received notice that glass would no longer be accepted for recycling due to "difficult economic realities."  Aluminum cans, plastic and whatnot still recyclable.  Not glass.  WTF ?

Glass is just melted sand.  There really isn't much of an energy benefit to reusing glass vs sand (as opposed to mining tons of earth to get a pound of aluminum).
Glass is heavy, so it is more expensive to ship than to just build a glass plant next to where sand comes from.
There isn't a great way to sort clear glass from colored glass, so it is easily contaminated.


It's economic viability is exactly in proportion to how severe the shortage of sand is.
 
2020-06-08 10:07:17 PM  
3 votes:

Smirky the Wonder Chimp: Other than enraged people, morons and sickness, is there ANYTHING we have in ample smounts?


I thought for a bit about it and came to the conclusion that those three categories pretty much covered any other possibilities I could think of.
 
2020-06-08 9:31:58 PM  
3 votes:
Uhhh just tell the Coca Cola Company thy can't use glass for making bottles for the rest of the year. There is hardly a shortage of glass, there is just a really stupid misdirection of glass.
 
2020-06-08 11:31:22 PM  
2 votes:
Pascal Soriot, CEO of AstraZeneca, on a conference call hosted by an industry trade group last week. "There's not enough vials in the world."

Oh, fark off. You're not even trying to look. Did you even try to look for the local or smaller companies that will gladly fill that need for you?

"The capacity is not there to do it in the billions."

Again. You're not even trying. You're farking lazy and you own the company that's measuring your profits to do it.

Csb, I've spent a lot of years in printing and working with with manufaturers of everything from pens to Pokemon to the buttons on Pepsi machines. The last ginormous company was a subsidiary of Consolodated Printing, that bought out the company I worked for in 2008 (PBM Graphics in NC). They were the exclusive printers of Pokemon, Magic the Gathering and a big supplier of Warcraft cards. Upper Deck, Hasbro, Sports Illustrated, Maxxim Magazine, Playboy, McDonalds, Starbucks....lots of shiat came off our presses. I was a press assistant and a maintenance manager (not a lead, I wasn't THAT cool apparently). We had 3 facilites running 24/7. We printed Magic cards by the billions. Each new release took about 4 months from print to fullfillment of games, blister packs and the little figurines.  That was ONE game. ONE customer. And since then I've worked at a couple news papers and hometown printing companies. We invented products. Or found people that could to fulfill their orders.

/end csb.

Point is if this guy can't get 2 billion vials or have 40 billion already for any other reason, then he's farking stalling. And lazy. Get farking busy.
 
2020-06-08 10:26:57 PM  
2 votes:

Gyrfalcon: albuquerquehalsey: Gyrfalcon: synithium: Good lord, we've run out of good sand!

How? HOW??

Vince Beiser: "So the sand that we use, is what you call 'marine sand.' It's the sand that you find at the bottom of rivers, and on beaches and at the bottom of lakes and oceans." I know what you're thinking, and no, we can't use sand from the desert. Wind erosion makes the grains too round for most purposes. We need angular sand that interlocks like pieces to a puzzle. Like the sand generated from mountain rocks, pelted by rain, wind, and rivers for over 25 thousand years.

There's no more sand in the oceans?!? How? HOW???


There is water
At the bottom of the ocean.
 
2020-06-08 10:06:25 PM  
2 votes:

Gyrfalcon: albuquerquehalsey: Gyrfalcon: synithium: Good lord, we've run out of good sand!

How? HOW??

Vince Beiser: "So the sand that we use, is what you call 'marine sand.' It's the sand that you find at the bottom of rivers, and on beaches and at the bottom of lakes and oceans." I know what you're thinking, and no, we can't use sand from the desert. Wind erosion makes the grains too round for most purposes. We need angular sand that interlocks like pieces to a puzzle. Like the sand generated from mountain rocks, pelted by rain, wind, and rivers for over 25 thousand years.

There's no more sand in the oceans?!? How? HOW???


You'd need deep sand. It also needs to be clean. Currently we just haul up oil from that deep. Because it's more valuable than sand.

Not sure all about why the need for such high purity, but that's how we source that type of fused silica.
 
2020-06-08 9:36:50 PM  
2 votes:
The magnificently stupid thing is that we've *definitively* known about the glass (ok, the raw materials) shortage for a few years... and could've guessed it was highly likely to be a BFD for years longer.  There's a goddamned thriving black market, it's so bad, FFS.

/gee i can't believe private industry didn't solve this critical problem on their own, since they're so great at that
//anyhow, first time i recall seeing anything about it: https://www.npr.org/2017/07/21/53​84726​71/world-faces-global-sand-shortage
 
2020-06-08 9:09:59 PM  
2 votes:

El Trolo: How can we make a lot of glass very quickly?


atomicheritage.orgView Full Size
 
2020-06-08 9:09:55 PM  
2 votes:
I have some soda bottles they can have for a nickel a pop.
 
2020-06-08 8:48:47 PM  
2 votes:

albuquerquehalsey: [media.gettyimages.com image 561x612]

get in line, Private.


I remember those. They -really- sucked.
 
2020-06-08 8:45:09 PM  
2 votes:
I know a guy who can help with that (nsfw audio).

Trailer Park Boys - Ray's Liquor-Lanche
Youtube CfCrnhRCIgw
 
2020-06-08 8:44:19 PM  
2 votes:
Vaccine?
 
2020-06-08 8:41:51 PM  
2 votes:
So the wealthy countries will get all the vaccines, got it.

Not worried about glass up here, we drink a lot of bottled beer.
 
2020-06-08 8:38:24 PM  
2 votes:
Good lord, we've run out of good sand!
 
2020-06-08 8:35:12 PM  
2 votes:
How can we make a lot of glass very quickly?
 
2020-06-09 5:06:39 AM  
1 vote:

Ivo Shandor: GrogSmash: Ivo Shandor: erik-k: I mentioned this to dad when I first saw it in my news feed a while ago and got ever the engineer's response: "why can't they use plastic?"

Another approach would be to send out the first batch, then collect the empties and re-fill them as needed. If they could do it for milk bottles a hundred years ago, they can figure out a way to do it for vaccines in 2020. Put a $10 deposit on each bottle if people need an incentive beyond saving lives.

I suspect there is a giant raft of sterility issues with that particular plan.

Crap ike this is generally treated in a 'clean room' manner.

Glass can be heated to a temperature which will take care of any biological contamination, and/or washed with chemicals to accomplish the same goal.


This supposed to be the reason beer comes in glass bottles . Pasteurisation will melt plastic bottles.
 
2020-06-09 1:32:28 AM  
1 vote:

fark'emfeed'emfish: bd1709h9t: Well this is weird.  The city in which I reside has for years had recycling that has included plastics, aluminum and glass.  Two months ago, we received notice that glass would no longer be accepted for recycling due to "difficult economic realities."  Aluminum cans, plastic and whatnot still recyclable.  Not glass.  WTF ?

Not sure about your area, but the US was exporting 1/3rd of recyclables to... China!

Seems they got tired of the quality of the garbage they were getting and in 2018 they shut down everything.

https://www.npr.org/2017/12/09/5687973​88/recycling-chaos-in-u-s-as-china-ban​s-foreign-waste


And yet they keep shipping low quality stuff to us
 
2020-06-09 1:29:14 AM  
1 vote:

Sean VasDeferens: Given the historical success rate of developing corona virus vaccines I'd say subby has nothing to worry about.


Of the seven coronaviruses that are known to infect humans:

- Four cause a common cold
- One is extinct (but a prototype vaccine was developed for it in 3 years)
- One is very rare outside of a single epidemic of human transmission

None of which are priority targets for vaccine development, though token work on MERS is ongoing

- The 7th is SARS-CoV-2

Three prototype vaccines have ALREADY successfully demonstrated efficacy after only 6 months. So it appears altogether likely that there will be multiple vaccines available for Covid, faster than any vaccine has ever been developed in history. Which means the scientists were right and you're full of crap, which is entirely in keeping with every other post of yours I have ever wasted the time to read.
 
2020-06-08 11:36:52 PM  
1 vote:

fanbladesaresharp: Pascal Soriot, CEO of AstraZeneca, on a conference call hosted by an industry trade group last week. "There's not enough vials in the world."

Oh, fark off. You're not even trying to look. Did you even try to look for the local or smaller companies that will gladly fill that need for you?

"The capacity is not there to do it in the billions."

Again. You're not even trying. You're farking lazy and you own the company that's measuring your profits to do it.

Csb, I've spent a lot of years in printing and working with with manufaturers of everything from pens to Pokemon to the buttons on Pepsi machines. The last ginormous company was a subsidiary of Consolodated Printing, that bought out the company I worked for in 2008 (PBM Graphics in NC). They were the exclusive printers of Pokemon, Magic the Gathering and a big supplier of Warcraft cards. Upper Deck, Hasbro, Sports Illustrated, Maxxim Magazine, Playboy, McDonalds, Starbucks....lots of shiat came off our presses. I was a press assistant and a maintenance manager (not a lead, I wasn't THAT cool apparently). We had 3 facilites running 24/7. We printed Magic cards by the billions. Each new release took about 4 months from print to fullfillment of games, blister packs and the little figurines.  That was ONE game. ONE customer. And since then I've worked at a couple news papers and hometown printing companies. We invented products. Or found people that could to fulfill their orders.

/end csb.

Point is if this guy can't get 2 billion vials or have 40 billion already for any other reason, then he's farking stalling. And lazy. Get farking busy.


Sounds like you have some selling to do.
 
2020-06-08 9:42:43 PM  
1 vote:

Ivo Shandor: erik-k: I mentioned this to dad when I first saw it in my news feed a while ago and got ever the engineer's response: "why can't they use plastic?"

Another approach would be to send out the first batch, then collect the empties and re-fill them as needed. If they could do it for milk bottles a hundred years ago, they can figure out a way to do it for vaccines in 2020. Put a $10 deposit on each bottle if people need an incentive beyond saving lives.


There's no reason for a deposit, it's not like it's being sold on store shelves. It's a closed loop supply chain
 
2020-06-08 9:31:48 PM  
1 vote:

albuquerquehalsey: [media.gettyimages.com image 561x612]

get in line, Private.


Yeah, which is worse, COVID-19 or hepatitis from the guy at the head of the line?
 
2020-06-08 9:24:50 PM  
1 vote:
dimebag the vaccine sure there is no lack of those.
 
2020-06-08 9:22:28 PM  
1 vote:

Ivo Shandor: albuquerquehalsey: Gyrfalcon: synithium: Good lord, we've run out of good sand!

How? HOW??

Vince Beiser: "So the sand that we use, is what you call 'marine sand.' It's the sand that you find at the bottom of rivers, and on beaches and at the bottom of lakes and oceans." I know what you're thinking, and no, we can't use sand from the desert. Wind erosion makes the grains too round for most purposes. We need angular sand that interlocks like pieces to a puzzle. Like the sand generated from mountain rocks, pelted by rain, wind, and rivers for over 25 thousand years.

We need to start breeding more parrotfish.


Some day I'll teach you about the difference between carbonates and silica.
 
2020-06-08 9:14:06 PM  
1 vote:
Corning's busy. Sorry.

Fark user imageView Full Size


Gorilla out front shoulda told ya.
 
2020-06-08 9:13:58 PM  
1 vote:

albuquerquehalsey: Gyrfalcon: synithium: Good lord, we've run out of good sand!

How? HOW??

Vince Beiser: "So the sand that we use, is what you call 'marine sand.' It's the sand that you find at the bottom of rivers, and on beaches and at the bottom of lakes and oceans." I know what you're thinking, and no, we can't use sand from the desert. Wind erosion makes the grains too round for most purposes. We need angular sand that interlocks like pieces to a puzzle. Like the sand generated from mountain rocks, pelted by rain, wind, and rivers for over 25 thousand years.


We need to start breeding more parrotfish.
 
2020-06-08 9:09:33 PM  
1 vote:

Dr. DJ Duckhunt: [media.comicbook.com image 640x320]
Inconsolable


ya know, given all the shows and movies and programs out there, I did miss the 'sequel' to that, and given how farking evil this world is today, the ending of unbreakable was a hopeful one, and I am terrified to watch the newest movie since it might not have a good "happy" ending with a positive resolution like unbreakable had. So tell me guys, did the follow up movie turn dark or did it have any good guys in it at all anywhere?
 
2020-06-08 9:06:48 PM  
1 vote:

Ivo Shandor: GrogSmash: Ivo Shandor: erik-k: I mentioned this to dad when I first saw it in my news feed a while ago and got ever the engineer's response: "why can't they use plastic?"

Another approach would be to send out the first batch, then collect the empties and re-fill them as needed. If they could do it for milk bottles a hundred years ago, they can figure out a way to do it for vaccines in 2020. Put a $10 deposit on each bottle if people need an incentive beyond saving lives.

I suspect there is a giant raft of sterility issues with that particular plan.

Crap ike this is generally treated in a 'clean room' manner.

Glass can be heated to a temperature which will take care of any biological contamination, and/or washed with chemicals to accomplish the same goal.


I know that, you know that.

Tell that to a federal regulator :P. Or the general (read half as smart as a bruised turnip) public.  Reused vials would have its own giant outcry.
 
2020-06-08 9:05:59 PM  
1 vote:

El Trolo: How can we make a lot of glass very quickly?


Well, it DOES start with an onerous healthcare system ironically....
 
2020-06-08 9:02:07 PM  
1 vote:
Not to worry farkers. The odds on a vaccine this year... approach zero as  a limit.

Now, EFFECTIVE TREATMENT, on the other hand, is a high probability.
 
2020-06-08 8:50:10 PM  
1 vote:
Whiny shiats will take every oppoturnity to whine some more
 
2020-06-08 8:45:07 PM  
1 vote:

Salmon: Not worried about glass up here, we drink a lot of bottled beer.


But what will you do when you have to choose between beer or a vaccine?
 
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