Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Medical Xpress)   Many patients with kidney failure regret initiating dialysis, that 17th beer   (medicalxpress.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Nephrology, kidney failure regret, Chronic kidney disease, Renal failure, patients experience regret, Dialysis, family members, kidney failure  
•       •       •

1439 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Jun 2020 at 11:07 AM (15 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



22 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-06-05 9:27:14 AM  
Article fails to mention any reasons why the patients regret going on dialysis and is therefore completely farking useless.
 
2020-06-05 11:26:42 AM  
I was a volunteer driver for the elderly.  I'm among the younger volunteers, so I got most of the long distance trips.  I drove one 90ish year old woman to dialysis twice a week, to a distant hospital for years.  She had avoided dialysis for nearly 20 years, by carefully watching her diet.  By carefully, I mean she ended up with joint issues due to lacking certain nutrients.  Twenty years of a perfect diet, that's some serious commitment/self control.

She kind of hated the treatments, but she wouldn't dream of ending them.  She also got annoyed by the old people who whined about the length and the discomfort of the treatments.
 
2020-06-05 11:28:50 AM  

Mollari: Article fails to mention any reasons why the patients regret going on dialysis and is therefore completely farking useless.


Yeah, I was kind of looking for that as well.

My mom (87) has kidney problems and we suspect that might come up. The rest of her health is not great so I'm not seeing it. She has DNR, etc., and I know she doesn't want all that done. I'm not looking forward to that coming up.
 
2020-06-05 11:32:27 AM  
My grandfather was on dialysis for years before a kidney transplant became possible. As a teenager with a new drivers license, I would drive him to/from treatments during the summer months. This was about 22 years ago, and it's probably improved, but at the time it was a god-awful treatment for the folks receiving it. A huge physical and mental toll to be sure.
 
2020-06-05 11:50:01 AM  
When the alternative is a horribly painful death why would regret even enter the equation.
 
2020-06-05 11:55:50 AM  
Because few studies have examined regret in patients after they've started dialysis as a treatment for kidney failure, a team led by Fahad Saeed, MD (University of Rochester Medical Center) and Paul R. Duberstein, Ph.D. (Rutgers School of Public Health) analyzed survey responses related to regret in patients receiving maintenance dialysis from 7 dialysis units in the Cleveland, Ohio area.

I can see why they regret it.
 
2020-06-05 12:07:40 PM  
My grandfather was faced with getting another year while on dialysis when his kidney's failed or a short two weeks max.

He chose the shorter time. He asked for a beer and some chocolate and told his family goodbye.
 
2020-06-05 12:07:41 PM  

sparkeyjames: When the alternative is a horribly painful death why would regret even enter the equation.


My dad did dialysis for about ten years, but eventually just decided to quit.  It took a few days, but he eventually just lost consciousness and died in hospice.
 
2020-06-05 12:09:51 PM  
All of the subjects were receiving hemodialysis, which explains a lot. If you're so desperate that you're answering random-ass 41-question surveys while having your blood sucked, then yeah, you probably feel some regret.
 
2020-06-05 12:10:25 PM  
I had kidney failure, and did 18 months of peritoneal dialysis.  It sucked being hooked up to a machine over night for 8 hours every day, but it kept me alive until I could get a transplant.  It was 4 years ago yesterday that I got my new kidney, and I have been healthier for those 4 years than I had for the 10 previously.

It sucked, but I don't regret any bit of it.
 
2020-06-05 12:27:57 PM  

Lovesandwich: I had kidney failure, and did 18 months of peritoneal dialysis.  It sucked being hooked up to a machine over night for 8 hours every day, but it kept me alive until I could get a transplant.  It was 4 years ago yesterday that I got my new kidney, and I have been healthier for those 4 years than I had for the 10 previously.

It sucked, but I don't regret any bit of it.


Wow, what a story. Glad to hear it worked out so well for you. I don't often get to hear the after story for people getting transplants.  Thanks for sharing.
 
2020-06-05 12:46:02 PM  

sparkeyjames: When the alternative is a horribly painful death why would regret even enter the equation.


A very good friend of mine died of kidney failure. It was a painless death. He just got weaker a bit and then one night passed away quietly in his sleep
 
2020-06-05 1:06:29 PM  

meanmutton: sparkeyjames: When the alternative is a horribly painful death why would regret even enter the equation.

A very good friend of mine died of kidney failure. It was a painless death. He just got weaker a bit and then one night passed away quietly in his sleep


It is 'painless", although I would hardly call it that.  I was very nearly dead at work before I knew that I was sick with kidney failure, gasping for air, unable to stand, wondering why I was so weak.

After starting dialysis, things got moderately better, although I was in slow decline.  Depression set in and I was put on medication for it.  Eating was difficult as I was severely restricted to a special diet to prevent my body from getting sicker.  Near the end, I was wishing that it was just over with so that I wouldn't have to deal with it anymore.

And I consider myself a strong person, as do those around me.

It isn't "painful"in the physical sense, but the emotional pain is intense to the point that you just want it done with so that you don't need to go through it anymore.
 
2020-06-05 1:19:53 PM  

Mollari: Article fails to mention any reasons why the patients regret going on dialysis and is therefore completely farking useless.


This. What options do the patients have beyond dialysis? What are the cost/benefits of each approach?
 
2020-06-05 1:49:25 PM  
They regret it, but what is the alternative?  Death?  They'd rather be dead?  When it comes down to it, it'll be dialysis or death, right?
 
2020-06-05 1:51:05 PM  
Y'all have lived some blessed lives if you really can't wrap your head around some people choosing death over continued suffering.
 
2020-06-05 2:10:22 PM  

Esroc: Y'all have lived some blessed lives if you really can't wrap your head around some people choosing death over continued suffering.


Oh, I can imagine it all right: But death is still on the table.

They can still choose it.

Do they?  Why or why not?  They--evidently (I don't mean to be a dick, I'm trying to figure out what it is they actually regret, and what this article means) regret "initiating dialysis" but I have to assume that they would regret being dead even more?
 
2020-06-05 2:21:35 PM  

SecondaryControl: Esroc: Y'all have lived some blessed lives if you really can't wrap your head around some people choosing death over continued suffering.

Oh, I can imagine it all right: But death is still on the table.

They can still choose it.

Do they?  Why or why not?  They--evidently (I don't mean to be a dick, I'm trying to figure out what it is they actually regret, and what this article means) regret "initiating dialysis" but I have to assume that they would regret being dead even more?


My friend decided not to go on dialysis and knew it meant death in a few weeks. At the time, he was having issues with his liver as well, his lungs had never been super strong, and he was ineligible for a kidney transplant. The options for him were to stay in the hospital or a hospital-like setting getting regular dialysis treatments and other interventions with no hope of ever getting better or go home, get his affairs in order, spend his last few weeks surrounded by friends and family.
 
2020-06-05 2:28:30 PM  
I thought swilling 3.2% beer all day was better for your kidneys than slamming a few liquor shots in short order?
 
2020-06-05 2:49:51 PM  
My Dad was on dialysis for about 3 years before he died, which is right in the ballpark for life expectancy for elderly patients (he was 78). It kept him alive and gave him a few more years with my Mom, but he got progressively worse and more miserable as time went on. If you're old and your kidneys are failing, it's highly unlikely you'll get a transplant.
If it weren't for Medicare, I'm not sure how many old people would go through with the treatments which just prolong the inevitable. Dad would get upset every month when the "bill" came from the dialysis center which totaled about $65k  (per month). I finally got him to understand that it was covered totally by Medicare (one of the few good things President  Nixon did) and Mom wouldn't be saddled with enormous debt after he died. Ultimately, I think he was unhappy he went through all the treatments.


According to data from the U.S. Renal Data System:
70- to 74-year-olds on dialysis live 3.6 years on average, compared with 12.2 years for their healthy peers;
75- to 79-year-olds on dialysis live 3.1 years on average, compared to 9.2 years;
80- to 85-year-olds on dialysis live 2.5 years on average, compared to 6.7 years; and
Patients on dialysis ages 85 and up live two years on average, compared to 3.5 years for their healthy peers.
 
2020-06-05 3:56:22 PM  
I've had 2 uncles stop dialysis in the last year and a half.  I used to work crisis intervention and the most depressing place I ever went was a giant dialysis center.
 
2020-06-05 8:58:11 PM  
My ex MIL was on dialysis for 10 years before she stopped. Between the dialysis and all of the complications and complications from complications, she'd get maybe 4 "good" days a year. She barely got to see her beloved granddaughter and really wasn't living.

If you have high blood pressure and/or diabetes, please take care of yourself.
 
Displayed 22 of 22 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.