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(Laughing Squid)   Clock magic =12   (laughingsquid.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Elena G, Face, Concept, elusive concept, point  
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1484 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Jun 2020 at 11:23 AM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



33 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-06-04 10:49:14 AM  
I was today-years-old when I learned this.
 
2020-06-04 11:24:54 AM  
I'm shocked.
 
2020-06-04 11:26:59 AM  
Get out!!
*gives subby an Elaine Bennis shove*
 
2020-06-04 11:31:03 AM  
Obvious tag sighing and rolling its eyes?
 
2020-06-04 11:31:16 AM  
No shiat.

/unless you use a duodecimal clock
 
2020-06-04 11:38:47 AM  
Why didn't I know this until now?

I don't know, because it's not important? It's just how the numbers line up when you put them in a circle, which was the easiest way to build a clock before we had digital displays
It's a coincidence, not a secret of the universe or anything... I mean it's cool, but I wouldn't write and article about it. Of course, that was 3 sentences talking about a TiikTok video, so I guess the author didn't really write an 'article' either...
 
2020-06-04 11:40:49 AM  
What about the 6?
 
2020-06-04 11:41:05 AM  
Well there's 15 seconds of my life I'll never get back.
 
2020-06-04 11:42:03 AM  
Unpossible!!!
 
2020-06-04 11:43:47 AM  
Holy shiat, when numbers are arranged geometrically, patterns may emerge!
 
2020-06-04 11:44:36 AM  
Opposite sides of dice add up to 7!

/at least the legal ones
//and I am referring to the standard d6
///yes, the d4 has issues
 
2020-06-04 11:50:16 AM  
It's called modular arithmetic.  Put simply, 11 is one hour before noon (0 time) and 1 o'clock is one hour after.  11+1=0.  Similarly with the rest.
\now do multiplication; note a*b=0 doesn't imply a or b is 0
\\ who's ready to learn about algebraic structures?!?!
 
2020-06-04 11:54:41 AM  

Schubert'sCell: It's called modular arithmetic.  Put simply, 11 is one hour before noon (0 time) and 1 o'clock is one hour after.  11+1=0.  Similarly with the rest.
\now do multiplication; note a*b=0 doesn't imply a or b is 0
\\ who's ready to learn about algebraic structures?!?!


But I was told there would be no math.

\there's always math
 
2020-06-04 11:55:26 AM  
Quick, post it to the PolTab as an evil liberal plot.

Is the "writer" of the article so fundamentally ignorant, or is it "bring your two-year-old to the home-office day" at Laughing Squid?
 
2020-06-04 11:57:00 AM  
lh3.googleusercontent.comView Full Size
 
2020-06-04 12:00:01 PM  
Numbers, man. Wild, wacky, unpredictable things.
 
2020-06-04 12:10:39 PM  
Maybe people don't know it because it isn't true?

If you count the number at the top and the bottom as being a single number, it's not true of the 6.  If you count them as two numbers opposed to each other, it's not true of the 12.  So no matter how you interpret it it's not true.
 
2020-06-04 12:11:10 PM  

MythDragon: [lh3.googleusercontent.com image 512x288]


Came here for this.

*High five*
 
2020-06-04 12:11:25 PM  
Hehe came
 
2020-06-04 12:14:38 PM  
You mean (n) + (12 - n) always equals twelve?!!?

BURN THE WITCH
 
2020-06-04 12:54:02 PM  
Oh wow, so if you take one number away from one side and add it to the other side, it'll keep the same sum ??? My mind is blown!
 
2020-06-04 1:16:28 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-06-04 1:16:53 PM  

skyotter: You mean (n) + (12 - n) always equals twelve?!!?

BURN THE WITCH


Mathemagician
Youtube KLdCsKCUiQA
 
db2
2020-06-04 1:53:32 PM  
Numbers going down from the left of 12: 12-x

Numbers going down from the right of 12: x

12-x+x = 12
 
2020-06-04 2:17:42 PM  
Mmm?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-06-04 2:44:22 PM  

SansNeural: Mmm?

[Fark user image image 837x842]


Same pattern, but now they add up to 24.

Or 60 for the inner ring.
 
2020-06-04 3:03:08 PM  
Base 60 and those CRRRAAAAZZZZYY Sumerians. How does that work?
 
2020-06-04 5:46:16 PM  
Last time I checked, (n-x) + x = n for pretty much every value of n and x.
 
2020-06-04 9:33:30 PM  
It's analogous to the quiz question from one of my grammar school classes: what's the sum of the integers from 1 to 100?

1+99 = 100
2+98 = 100
.
.
49+51 = 100

so that's 4900 + 50 + 100 = 5050
 
2020-06-04 11:31:00 PM  

brachiopod: It's analogous to the quiz question from one of my grammar school classes: what's the sum of the integers from 1 to 100?

1+99 = 100
2+98 = 100
.
.
49+51 = 100

so that's 4900 + 50 + 100 = 5050


Euler made this simpler. (n*(n+1))/2
 
2020-06-05 2:15:43 AM  
If you're nerdy enough to comment on this thread, I highly recommend: https://www.goodreads.com/​book/show/68​2027.The_Book_of_Numbers
/Sigh, lost John Conway to Covid earlier this year...
 
2020-06-05 11:57:30 AM  

tkil: If you're nerdy enough to comment on this thread, I highly recommend: https://www.goodreads.com/b​ook/show/682027.The_Book_of_Numbers
/Sigh, lost John Conway to Covid earlier this year...


Interesting that the book was first published in 1995, but the prose style is in the, what I call "stilted, educated, convolute formal" style that seems to have mostly faded before the 1950's and was rampant in scholarly texts for a few hundred years before.

Example from your cited book:

"Most languages have interesting features about their number words, which repay studyWe content ourselves with exhibiting whose in Welsh."

I've sometimes entertained myself by translating that type of prose into "human speak".  Here's the above example translated:

"Number words in most languages have interesting features.  Welsh is an excellent example."
 
2020-06-05 12:05:20 PM  
Meh, maybe that style hasn't gone away completely in scholarly publications.  Perhaps it's still expected that you must make your prose a puzzle, even if the topic isn't linguistic.

But this book's preface says "our aim is to bring to the inquisitive reader without particular mathematical background..." which I take as being the "everyman".  Not "everyman with a degree in English".

More bizarrely, it's like they're saying, "Here's a cool book about numbers that you don't have to be a mathematician to enjoy.  Oh, but you do have to be able to slog through weighty passive voice, unnecessarily complex sentence structure and show-off word choice.
 
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