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(YouTube)   This is 1 of 2 things. Either it is fake w/ trained animals... or we have an instance of English being a common language between species. Your dog/cat/bird understands some of your talk, but we understand nothing of theirs. So who is smarter?   (youtube.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy  
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771 clicks; posted to D'awww » on 30 May 2020 at 12:28 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



27 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-05-30 10:01:12 AM  
Even if fake it is funny.
 
2020-05-30 11:02:14 AM  
It's an African Gray. It 100% understands what it's saying. Look up Irene Pepperberg's research with Alex.
 
2020-05-30 11:47:07 AM  

LaViergeNoire: Irene Pepperberg's research with Alex


Thank you!
 
2020-05-30 12:15:01 PM  
It's not fake. The bird is simply mimicking what it's heard.  That dog barks constantly - enough that the bird has learned the humans' responses.

I had a friend whose mom had several birds - one would screech, and the mom would say "Zorro" to shut it up.  Over time, one of the other birds, a parrot I think, started saying, "Zorro" every time that damn bird screeched.  Then, eventually, the parrot started spontaneously going "*SCREECH* Zorro".

I do not know how they lived with those f*cking birds.
 
2020-05-30 12:15:11 PM  
what? i have been able to speak cat and dog since i was a child.
 
2020-05-30 12:22:46 PM  
woof woof!
What's that Lassie, Timmy fell down the well again?
 
2020-05-30 12:25:25 PM  
It's funny how a raven's "mimicry" of a human voice seems so much clearer to me than a parrot's.
 
2020-05-30 12:26:16 PM  

KarmicDisaster: woof woof!
What's that Lassie, Timmy fell down the well again?


Timmy is a goddamn idiot.
 
2020-05-30 12:27:17 PM  
Over time, people and animals learn certain sounds are associated with them. For example, when I used to work in a warehouse, I didn't really understand what the Hispanic guys that worked there were saying. After a bit, I learned what my name was in Spanish because they kept yelling it to me. I wouldn't have guessed that my name translates to "Pinche Pendejo" but it was great to learn and I responded immediately!
 
2020-05-30 12:36:03 PM  

scottydoesntknow: Over time, people and animals learn certain sounds are associated with them. For example, when I used to work in a warehouse, I didn't really understand what the Hispanic guys that worked there were saying. After a bit, I learned what my name was in Spanish because they kept yelling it to me. I wouldn't have guessed that my name translates to "Pinche Pendejo" but it was great to learn and I responded immediately!


LMAO. Very good.
 
2020-05-30 1:00:13 PM  
I have an African Grey. He is 31 and I've had him since he was 3 months old. He does understand language and at times he talks in context. Very little of what he knows I taught him, he just observes and learns to comment on his own. But like someone else says, he's learned to mimic what his humans say when the dog barks. If I tell the cat to get down from the counter, my bird usually chimes in with "good boy" when the cat minds me. It's because he knows what I usually say then. I've had lots of cats and dogs and I've learned over time that my AG is smarter than a cat or a dog in different ways. But they do learn by paying attention to context and response, which is what this is. It's been said they have the cognitive ability of a two year old child. That has fit my bird pretty accurately.
 
2020-05-30 1:02:08 PM  

xanadian: It's funny how a raven's "mimicry" of a human voice seems so much clearer to me than a parrot's.


Depends on the bird. My Grey sounds exactly like me.
 
2020-05-30 3:32:57 PM  

dodecahedron: I have an African Grey. He is 31 and I've had him since he was 3 months old. He does understand language and at times he talks in context. Very little of what he knows I taught him, he just observes and learns to comment on his own. But like someone else says, he's learned to mimic what his humans say when the dog barks. If I tell the cat to get down from the counter, my bird usually chimes in with "good boy" when the cat minds me. It's because he knows what I usually say then. I've had lots of cats and dogs and I've learned over time that my AG is smarter than a cat or a dog in different ways. But they do learn by paying attention to context and response, which is what this is. It's been said they have the cognitive ability of a two year old child. That has fit my bird pretty accurately.


And how different is "mimicking" from how a baby learns from parents and other people in his or her environment. We coo at babies and say things like "Da-Da!" and they respond with "Da-Da". They learn cue-and-response like when they cry they get a response from a parent. It's actually the scientific method applied to understanding the world about them. They hear a sound and they see a response (both babies and birds). They apply the sound to see if they elicit the same response. For one thing, it does indicate that birds have a sense of temporal relationships: action A -- some elapsed time --> response B. In general, for most pets, if response B isn't immediately after action A, they can't connect the two.
 
2020-05-30 4:54:42 PM  
My favorite African Gray story:  It learned to imitate police sirens, which drove the family dog nuts.
 
2020-05-30 5:09:13 PM  

Harlee: LaViergeNoire: Irene Pepperberg's research with Alex

Thank you!

Alex remains the only non-human animal I know of to have ever been observed to have asked a question of its own initiative, to satisfy its own curiosity ("What color am I?" when looking in a mirror).
 
2020-05-30 5:12:13 PM  
People with more knowledge about birds have already chimed in.

For what I know (dogs) their language is 90 percent non verbal. My dog communicates with me just fine. He's not going to regale me with a long story about his day, but I know when he's scared, excited, hungry, ready to fight, playful, happy, nervous, tired, or bored. That's his language, and it works great for those who stop to listen.

Most humans can't pull their head out of their asses long enough to read what an animal is saying.


But trust me. You see this coming at you it's communicating a message:

static.boredpanda.comView Full Size
 
2020-05-30 5:29:08 PM  

natazha: My favorite African Gray story:  It learned to imitate police sirens, which drove the family dog nuts.


Mine does the smoke detector, but only when he has exhausted other attention tactics.
 
2020-05-30 5:30:38 PM  

dericwater: dodecahedron: I have an African Grey. He is 31 and I've had him since he was 3 months old. He does understand language and at times he talks in context. Very little of what he knows I taught him, he just observes and learns to comment on his own. But like someone else says, he's learned to mimic what his humans say when the dog barks. If I tell the cat to get down from the counter, my bird usually chimes in with "good boy" when the cat minds me. It's because he knows what I usually say then. I've had lots of cats and dogs and I've learned over time that my AG is smarter than a cat or a dog in different ways. But they do learn by paying attention to context and response, which is what this is. It's been said they have the cognitive ability of a two year old child. That has fit my bird pretty accurately.

And how different is "mimicking" from how a baby learns from parents and other people in his or her environment. We coo at babies and say things like "Da-Da!" and they respond with "Da-Da". They learn cue-and-response like when they cry they get a response from a parent. It's actually the scientific method applied to understanding the world about them. They hear a sound and they see a response (both babies and birds). They apply the sound to see if they elicit the same response. For one thing, it does indicate that birds have a sense of temporal relationships: action A -- some elapsed time --> response B. In general, for most pets, if response B isn't immediately after action A, they can't connect the two.


The difference is humans generally are able to complete much more complex cognitive tasks than a parrot can after 30 years?*

*Does not apply to humanities facilty.
 
2020-05-30 6:26:39 PM  
#3 Subby-The owner says the same thing when the dog barks, and the parrot is smart enough to know when the dog barks that the correct response is "Stop it!".

This is how parrots work, nothing mysterious about it.
 
2020-05-30 6:29:44 PM  

dericwater: dodecahedron: I have an African Grey. He is 31 and I've had him since he was 3 months old. He does understand language and at times he talks in context. Very little of what he knows I taught him, he just observes and learns to comment on his own. But like someone else says, he's learned to mimic what his humans say when the dog barks. If I tell the cat to get down from the counter, my bird usually chimes in with "good boy" when the cat minds me. It's because he knows what I usually say then. I've had lots of cats and dogs and I've learned over time that my AG is smarter than a cat or a dog in different ways. But they do learn by paying attention to context and response, which is what this is. It's been said they have the cognitive ability of a two year old child. That has fit my bird pretty accurately.

And how different is "mimicking" from how a baby learns from parents and other people in his or her environment. We coo at babies and say things like "Da-Da!" and they respond with "Da-Da". They learn cue-and-response like when they cry they get a response from a parent. It's actually the scientific method applied to understanding the world about them. They hear a sound and they see a response (both babies and birds). They apply the sound to see if they elicit the same response. For one thing, it does indicate that birds have a sense of temporal relationships: action A -- some elapsed time --> response B. In general, for most pets, if response B isn't immediately after action A, they can't connect the two.


The difference is that children grow up, learn to communicate, and do things like initiate conversations, and go in new directions. Parrots are smart, but this one isn't going to sit down and discuss existentialism or physics with you, no matter how long it lives. A baby mimicking words and a parrot mimicking words are two vastly different things. There is no potential for a parrot to take the words they know and create a story out of them...
 
2020-05-30 6:31:15 PM  

dodecahedron: xanadian: It's funny how a raven's "mimicry" of a human voice seems so much clearer to me than a parrot's.

Depends on the bird. My Grey sounds exactly like me.


My foster parents' parrot would talk like my foster mother and laugh just like my foster sister. He(or she) also learned to cry and sound like my nephew. Each time, you could tell which person the parrot was repeating.
 
2020-05-30 10:16:04 PM  
Starlings can imitate the human voice perfectly right down to a smokers cough. They also can use the words and phrases in context such as "good night" when they want to go to bed. My partner had one for 15 years he would remind us it was time for Hill Street Blues by repeating the intro for the show perfectly. Many birds crows, mocking birds catbirds can do this. A favourite wild starling trick is to do the redtail hawk whistle and grab the food when everyone scatters.
 
2020-05-31 1:24:41 AM  

xanadian: It's funny how a raven's "mimicry" of a human voice seems so much clearer to me than a parrot's.


That's because parrots are learning the words, but ravens are learning the sounds.
 
2020-05-31 9:37:16 AM  

COMALite J: Harlee: LaViergeNoire: Irene Pepperberg's research with Alex

Thank you!
Alex remains the only non-human animal I know of to have ever been observed to have asked a question of its own initiative, to satisfy its own curiosity ("What color am I?" when looking in a mirror).


Chimpanzees (particularly Bonobos) and Gorillas have also been observed asking questions, they just do so through signing or pointing to lexigrams.  Alex is probably the only non-primate animal observed to do this (so far).  My guess would be that dolphins, at least, also have the capability, but they've always been harder to test than other animals because of the constraints of their water-based lifestyle.

Incidentally, if you've never heard of Kanzi, look him up.
 
2020-05-31 12:41:35 PM  

ZephyrHawk: COMALite J: Harlee: LaViergeNoire: Irene Pepperberg's research with Alex

Thank you!
Alex remains the only non-human animal I know of to have ever been observed to have asked a question of its own initiative, to satisfy its own curiosity ("What color am I?" when looking in a mirror).

Chimpanzees (particularly Bonobos) and Gorillas have also been observed asking questions, they just do so through signing or pointing to lexigrams.  Alex is probably the only non-primate animal observed to do this (so far).  My guess would be that dolphins, at least, also have the capability, but they've always been harder to test than other animals because of the constraints of their water-based lifestyle.

Incidentally, if you've never heard of Kanzi, look him up.

Thanks for the tip on Kanzi.

I remember reading an intriguing speculation regarding cetaceans (dolphins and whales) decades ago. Someone had noticed that recordings of whale songs from formerly captive whales released into the ocean exhibited reverbation similar to the reverb of their former captive tanks, while the wild whales did not.

What if they can basically fake reverb with their sonar? Similar to modern digital audio convolution processing where reverb from a real physical space such as a certain performance venue is mapped onto a non-reverberant vocal or instrumental recording to give the impression that it was performed in that particular space? Imagine it: they could project any sonar imagery they desire to any sonar-capable individual within hearing range. It'd be tantamount to image-based non-verbal telepathy. Who needs words to describe things when you can simply project the shape of what you're wanting to convey directly to the listener?

Could this be why dolphin brains are bigger than ours even on a body-mass ratio basis?

With modern digital software, perhaps this hypothesis could be tested.
 
2020-05-31 4:14:31 PM  

COMALite J: ZephyrHawk: COMALite J: Harlee: LaViergeNoire: Irene Pepperberg's research with Alex

Thank you!
Alex remains the only non-human animal I know of to have ever been observed to have asked a question of its own initiative, to satisfy its own curiosity ("What color am I?" when looking in a mirror).

Chimpanzees (particularly Bonobos) and Gorillas have also been observed asking questions, they just do so through signing or pointing to lexigrams.  Alex is probably the only non-primate animal observed to do this (so far).  My guess would be that dolphins, at least, also have the capability, but they've always been harder to test than other animals because of the constraints of their water-based lifestyle.

Incidentally, if you've never heard of Kanzi, look him up.
Thanks for the tip on Kanzi.

I remember reading an intriguing speculation regarding cetaceans (dolphins and whales) decades ago. Someone had noticed that recordings of whale songs from formerly captive whales released into the ocean exhibited reverbation similar to the reverb of their former captive tanks, while the wild whales did not.

What if they can basically fake reverb with their sonar? Similar to modern digital audio convolution processing where reverb from a real physical space such as a certain performance venue is mapped onto a non-reverberant vocal or instrumental recording to give the impression that it was performed in that particular space? Imagine it: they could project any sonar imagery they desire to any sonar-capable individual within hearing range. It'd be tantamount to image-based non-verbal telepathy. Who needs words to describe things when you can simply project the shape of what you're wanting to convey directly to the listener?

Could this be why dolphin brains are bigger than ours even on a body-mass ratio basis?

With modern digital software, perhaps this hypothesis could be tested.


I'm so stealing this idea to play with somewhere in my writing. Thank you.
 
2020-05-31 8:20:08 PM  

Boudyro: COMALite J: ZephyrHawk: COMALite J: Harlee: LaViergeNoire: Irene Pepperberg's research with Alex

Thank you!
Alex remains the only non-human animal I know of to have ever been observed to have asked a question of its own initiative, to satisfy its own curiosity ("What color am I?" when looking in a mirror).

Chimpanzees (particularly Bonobos) and Gorillas have also been observed asking questions, they just do so through signing or pointing to lexigrams.  Alex is probably the only non-primate animal observed to do this (so far).  My guess would be that dolphins, at least, also have the capability, but they've always been harder to test than other animals because of the constraints of their water-based lifestyle.

Incidentally, if you've never heard of Kanzi, look him up.
Thanks for the tip on Kanzi.

I remember reading an intriguing speculation regarding cetaceans (dolphins and whales) decades ago. Someone had noticed that recordings of whale songs from formerly captive whales released into the ocean exhibited reverbation similar to the reverb of their former captive tanks, while the wild whales did not.

What if they can basically fake reverb with their sonar? Similar to modern digital audio convolution processing where reverb from a real physical space such as a certain performance venue is mapped onto a non-reverberant vocal or instrumental recording to give the impression that it was performed in that particular space? Imagine it: they could project any sonar imagery they desire to any sonar-capable individual within hearing range. It'd be tantamount to image-based non-verbal telepathy. Who needs words to describe things when you can simply project the shape of what you're wanting to convey directly to the listener?

Could this be why dolphin brains are bigger than ours even on a body-mass ratio basis?

With modern digital software, perhaps this hypothesis could be tested.

I'm so stealing this idea to play with somewhere in my writing. Thank you.

Be sure to send me a copy.
$myEmail = str_replace(' ', '.', $myFARKusername) . [nospam-﹫-backwards]lia­mg*c­om';

As I said, tantamount to imagery telepathy, but without having to resort to metaphysics. With an actual physics explanation.
 
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