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(History Channel)   On this day in history, in 1754, George Washington spilled the first blood of the French and Indian war, setting up a series of increasingly bloody sequels that critics claim miss the point of the original   (history.com) divider line
    More: Vintage, French and Indian War, George Washington, French reconnaissance party, Virginia militia, French soldiers, Washington's men, 22-Year-Old George Washington, French commander  
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1239 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 May 2020 at 1:20 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-05-28 12:22:31 PM  
He admitted to a war crime after this as well, in order to prevent the brother of the officer who he killed in his sleep, from massacring all his men.   This war...the French and Indian war was part of the real first World War involving fighting on 3 continents (if not 4), as well as naval battles in multiple oceans.
 
2020-05-28 12:54:02 PM  
 
2020-05-28 1:26:38 PM  
Ah yes, the war that eventually cost Louie and Marie their heads.
 
2020-05-28 1:33:55 PM  

Porkbelly: Ah yes, the war that eventually cost Louie and Marie their heads.


I don't think they were born yet?
 
2020-05-28 1:36:07 PM  

Porkbelly: Ah yes, the war that eventually cost Louie and Marie their heads.


Let them eat pemmican.
 
2020-05-28 1:37:08 PM  
Fake news!

The sedetion-mongering Southern planters want you to believe that Washington was a saint and a hero, but he was a war criminal, launching the first step towards sedition against the Church and Crown.

He is painted as a man who could not tell a lie, by the Reverend propagandist, Weems, but he told plenty of them.

Wake up, Sheeple! Things are never as cut and dried as they are in hagiography and political propaganda (aka history).

Just kidding (not kidding). The situation was more fluid and complicated, less inevitable and settled than hind-sight (which in reality is like, 50-50 or something) makes us all believe.

The Whig Fallacy is not just for Whigs any more. The Tories are up to their red, white and blue noses in it.

I consider myself a liberal or even radical Whig compared to my "Tory" ancestors, even the real Whigs among them. But that is in hindsight. Hard to say who or what I would fight for if plopped down in the midst of current events without Google. I expect I would do what about a third of the American colonists did: change sides on the news of arriving "troops" and not on seeing the white of their eyes.
 
2020-05-28 1:40:27 PM  
Then Mel Gibson's character from The Patriot was bought drinks for years afterwards.  Until he called a lady "Sugar Tits" anyway.
 
2020-05-28 1:40:29 PM  
media1.tenor.comView Full Size
 
2020-05-28 1:42:02 PM  

macadamnut: Porkbelly: Ah yes, the war that eventually cost Louie and Marie their heads.

I don't think they were born yet?


Hey, it was a long war.

But historians generally agree that most of the French national debt that disrupted and destablized France in favour of the Banker Party for the next two or three hundred years, was caused by French intervention at great cost on the Colonial Rebel side to thwart the British. 1789 was born long before 1776, let alone 1754. I'd have to look up the dates to be sure, but 1754 was only 45 years old in 1789. Older than the Austrian Woman, but possibly younger than the Well-Belovèd.
 
2020-05-28 1:44:04 PM  
Louis XVI:  born 24 August 1754. Just out of the gate for the French and Indian Wars which lasted about 7 years, IIRC.
 
2020-05-28 1:46:38 PM  

johnny_vegas: [media1.tenor.com image 228x320] [View Full Size image _x_]


What did Benny Hill do during the French and Indian war? I will guess he ran around in speeded up motion, being alternately chased and chasing, a variety of buxom wenches, ladies and troops dressed in fashionable and whimsical variants on red, white and blue uniforms.

George Washington designed his own General's unifrom and went strutting around in it, dropping broad hints that he would like to be a General in the Constitutionalist Army or whatever they called themselves when at home.
 
2020-05-28 1:48:59 PM  
Washington's Mother, a dedicated Tory, spent the war writing crabby, whinging letters accusing Georgie Porgie of neglecting his Dear Old Mother. She whined like Donnie T in a negative news cycle.

She lost. He stayed at work during the whole war so as to not have to see her in person.
 
2020-05-28 1:53:53 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-28 1:56:11 PM  

Hendawg: Then Mel Gibson's character from The Patriot was bought drinks for years afterwards.  Until he called a lady "Sugar Tits" anyway.


The Patriot was really bad history.

The British were much worse than that.

How bad?  The survival rate on the prison hulk HMS Jersey and other British prison hulks was worse than that at Auschwitz.

Something like 12,400+ were held on them, and only 1,400 survived, for a survival rate of about 11.3%
https://www.history.com/topics/americ​a​n-revolution/the-hms-jersey

Survival rate at Auschwitz was slightly higher at 15.4% (200k survivors out of 1.3M total).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auschwi​t​z_concentration_camp

Now, of necessity, both of those numbers have some "slop" because of record keeping issues, but they're close enough that it's a stain on the British, especially since it wasn't because of some forgetful neglect or lack of available supplies, it was a conscious policy.

HMS Jersey & the American Revolution
Youtube RjfBx99877g
 
2020-05-28 1:59:27 PM  
Here is the full talk:

https://www.c-span.org/video/?438511-1​/hms-jersey-american-revolution

It's just under an hour long.
 
2020-05-28 2:02:09 PM  

Chris Ween: This war...the French and Indian war was part of the real first World War involving fighting on 3 continents (if not 4), as well as naval battles in multiple oceans.


Eh. I don't know if I'd call it a world war. It was really just France -v- England. I'm not sure the stuff going on outside of America really had much to do with the war here.
 
2020-05-28 2:06:44 PM  
History Channel? So the Nazis instigated this with their alien time machine based on an obscure Bible code?
 
2020-05-28 2:17:04 PM  

macadamnut: Porkbelly: Ah yes, the war that eventually cost Louie and Marie their heads.

I don't think they were born yet?


I think you don't read a whole lot of history but I'll give you the short version:  France was still DEEP in debt from the French and Indian War, and that was the direct cause of all the unrest.

Another tidbit - this war was also the direct cause of the Revolutionary War (our war).  England was having a lot of trouble paying for the F&I war and thought the colonist should pony up as they were the main beneficiaries.

You are correct that Louie and Marie weren't born.
 
2020-05-28 2:18:21 PM  

brantgoose: johnny_vegas: [media1.tenor.com image 228x320] [View Full Size image _x_]

What did Benny Hill do during the French and Indian war? I will guess he ran around in speeded up motion, being alternately chased and chasing, a variety of buxom wenches, ladies and troops dressed in fashionable and whimsical variants on red, white and blue uniforms.

George Washington designed his own General's unifrom and went strutting around in it, dropping broad hints that he would like to be a General in the Constitutionalist Army or whatever they called themselves when at home.


media3.giphy.comView Full Size
 
2020-05-28 2:19:06 PM  

brantgoose: macadamnut: Porkbelly: Ah yes, the war that eventually cost Louie and Marie their heads.

I don't think they were born yet?

Hey, it was a long war.

But historians generally agree that most of the French national debt that disrupted and destablized France in favour of the Banker Party for the next two or three hundred years, was caused by French intervention at great cost on the Colonial Rebel side to thwart the British. 1789 was born long before 1776, let alone 1754. I'd have to look up the dates to be sure, but 1754 was only 45 years old in 1789. Older than the Austrian Woman, but possibly younger than the Well-Belovèd.


You and I would have a lot of fun drinking and discussing history.  I just put in an order at my library to get Andrew Robert's bios on Napoleon and Churchill.
 
2020-05-28 2:23:21 PM  

abhorrent1: Chris Ween: This war...the French and Indian war was part of the real first World War involving fighting on 3 continents (if not 4), as well as naval battles in multiple oceans.

Eh. I don't know if I'd call it a world war. It was really just France -v- England. I'm not sure the stuff going on outside of America really had much to do with the war here.


"The Seven Years' War was a global conflict that was fought between 1756 and 1763. It involved all five European great powers of the time-the Kingdoms of Great Britain, Prussia and France, the Habsburg Monarchy of Austria and the Russian Empire-plus many of Europe's middle powers and spanned five continents, affecting Europe, the Americas, West Africa, India, and the Philippines. The conflict split Europe into two coalitions: one was led by Great Britain (including the German state, the Electorate of Brunswick-Lüneburg ruled in personal union) and Prussia, supported by the Kingdom of Portugal and a few other small German states; while the other was led by France and included the Austrian-led Holy Roman Empire, including the Electorate of Saxony and most of the smaller German states, Russia coontil 1762), the Kingdom of Spain, and Sweden."
 
2020-05-28 2:28:57 PM  

brantgoose: Fake news!

The sedetion-mongering Southern planters want you to believe that Washington was a saint and a hero, but he was a war criminal, launching the first step towards sedition against the Church and Crown.

He is painted as a man who could not tell a lie, by the Reverend propagandist, Weems, but he told plenty of them.

Wake up, Sheeple! Things are never as cut and dried as they are in hagiography and political propaganda (aka history).

Just kidding (not kidding). The situation was more fluid and complicated, less inevitable and settled than hind-sight (which in reality is like, 50-50 or something) makes us all believe.

The Whig Fallacy is not just for Whigs any more. The Tories are up to their red, white and blue noses in it.

I consider myself a liberal or even radical Whig compared to my "Tory" ancestors, even the real Whigs among them. But that is in hindsight. Hard to say who or what I would fight for if plopped down in the midst of current events without Google. I expect I would do what about a third of the American colonists did: change sides on the news of arriving "troops" and not on seeing the white of their eyes.


Funny story:

My grandmother was a founding member of the DAR.  She was born in 1870.  She was the second soprano in the Boston opera, her sister was first soprano.  In 1939 when the DAR refused to let Marion Anderson sing at DAR Constitution Hall (a segregated place) my grandmother made a VERY public renunciation of her membership.

Fast forward to 1975.  My sister (a do-gooder if there ever was one) decided she could change some DAR minds (as it by now was an ultra-conservative bunch of blue haired twits) subversively - so she applied for membership.  The DAR sent her a crisply worded note telling my sister that she, and all her sisters and future children, were black-balled because of grandma's rudeness.

I worked in DC for 30 years from 1979-2009 and passed by the DAR Constitution Hall almost daily in my travels from the Tidal Basin (where I could park for free) to my office across from the National Geographic building.  My office had free beer at 5:00 every day.  Virtually every day I managed to drop an empty beer can somewhere on the front of the DAR C. hall.  They probably still wonder what was going on.

If you like good history writers I recommend Nathanial Philbrick.  He wrote a great book (among others)- The Heart of the Sea.  It's the story of the Essex, a whaling ship out of Nantucket (1830's) that was rammed and sunk by a whale in the pacific.  This was the book that Melville based the book Moby Dick on.  It's a MUCH MORE readable book that Moby Dick (but not for the faint of heart as there was cannibalism galore).

I'm reading Philbrick's book about Custer's Last Stand (a good killing if there ever was one) at the present time.
 
2020-05-28 2:35:34 PM  

abhorrent1: Chris Ween: This war...the French and Indian war was part of the real first World War involving fighting on 3 continents (if not 4), as well as naval battles in multiple oceans.

Eh. I don't know if I'd call it a world war. It was really just France -v- England. I'm not sure the stuff going on outside of America really had much to do with the war here.


From the History Channel
2. It was part of the first global war.
"The volley fired by a young Virginian in the backwoods of America set the world on fire," declared English author Horace Walpole, and indeed the 1754 battle started by Washington sparked the Seven Years' War, a global conflagration in which hundreds of thousands died. Called "the first world war" by Winston Churchill, the Seven Years' War included fighting in Europe, the Caribbean, the Philippines, India and Africa. It was the North American portion of the conflict that became known as the French and Indian War. While Britain kept up the fight in North America against France, it relied on its ally Prussia, led by Frederick the Great, to sustain the fight in Europe against France, Austria, Russia and Sweden.
 
2020-05-28 2:42:38 PM  

Chris Ween: This war...the French and Indian war was part of the real first World War involving fighting on 3 continents (if not 4), as well as naval battles in multiple oceans.


You really need that last conditional, because the pan-Mediterranean Wars were fought on three continents, too. Although what was the second ocean in the Seven Years' War?
 
2020-05-28 2:47:41 PM  

Porkbelly: I'm reading Philbrick's book about Custer's Last Stand (a good killing if there ever was one) at the present time.


You probably also want Donovan's A Terrible Glory as well. Historians basically side with Custer or Benteen, and as the two men despised each other, the one you believe colors the coverage of their opponent.
 
2020-05-28 2:50:40 PM  
Back in third grade, I got in trouble with my teacher for arguing that it shouldn't have been called 'The French and Indian War' because the French and the Indians were not fighting against each other.

/still seems like a stupid name ...
 
2020-05-28 3:01:01 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Back in third grade, I got in trouble with my teacher for arguing that it shouldn't have been called 'The French and Indian War' because the French and the Indians were not fighting against each other.

/still seems like a stupid name ...


I agree - after all, they called them WWI and WWII and an entire continent had nothing happening in either war.
 
2020-05-28 3:20:32 PM  
On this day in history, in 1754, George Washington spilled the first blood of the French and Indian war


This is complete bullshiat. The French were well known for their abundance of written correspondence and I'm positive someone suffered a paper cut previous to the Washington incident.
 
2020-05-28 4:54:37 PM  

dittybopper: Hendawg: Then Mel Gibson's character from The Patriot was bought drinks for years afterwards.  Until he called a lady "Sugar Tits" anyway.

The Patriot was really bad history.

The British were much worse than that.

How bad?  The survival rate on the prison hulk HMS Jersey and other British prison hulks was worse than that at Auschwitz.

Something like 12,400+ were held on them, and only 1,400 survived, for a survival rate of about 11.3%
https://www.history.com/topics/america​n-revolution/the-hms-jersey

Survival rate at Auschwitz was slightly higher at 15.4% (200k survivors out of 1.3M total).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auschwit​z_concentration_camp

Now, of necessity, both of those numbers have some "slop" because of record keeping issues, but they're close enough that it's a stain on the British, especially since it wasn't because of some forgetful neglect or lack of available supplies, it was a conscious policy.

[YouTube video: HMS Jersey & the American Revolution]


I've realized for quite some time that a historical movie starring Mel Gibson only goes so far as to be "based on a true story" and only based, cause nothing much of fact is there beyond that
 
2020-05-28 7:24:56 PM  
Had distant relatives ambushed by Shawnee at their homestead, on the frontier, at the end of the war. The survivors were rescued by the British, sent from Fort Duquesne, a few years later. There is a monument at the site of the ambush.
 
2020-05-28 8:05:15 PM  

mom_dropped_me: Had distant relatives ambushed by Shawnee at their homestead, on the frontier, at the end of the war. The survivors were rescued by the British, sent from Fort Duquesne, a few years later. There is a monument at the site of the ambush.


That's what happens when you invade someone's land and they don't like it.  What would you do if someone invaded your property and kicked you out?
 
2020-05-28 10:18:43 PM  

Porkbelly: mom_dropped_me: Had distant relatives ambushed by Shawnee at their homestead, on the frontier, at the end of the war. The survivors were rescued by the British, sent from Fort Duquesne, a few years later. There is a monument at the site of the ambush.

That's what happens when you invade someone's land and they don't like it.  What would you do if someone invaded your property and kicked you out?


This sounds a lot like present day California.
 
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