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(Phys Org2)   Extremely intense radio burst detected from magnetar SGR 1935+2154. Pay no attention to those proto-horns or third eye on your newborns   (phys.org) divider line
    More: Obvious, Neutron star, Pulsar, millisecond-duration radio burst, radio telescope, Electromagnetic radiation, understanding of the origin of fast radio bursts, Milky Way, intense event  
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489 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 May 2020 at 7:03 PM (16 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-05-28 4:33:01 PM  
D"ecay of magnetic fields in magnetars powers the emission of high-energy electromagnetic radiation, for instance, in the form of X-rays or radio waves."

So...across the electromagnetic spectrum, or only at the extremes?  Ever as visible light?
 
2020-05-28 7:06:22 PM  
To be fair, those were pre-existing conditions...
 
2020-05-28 7:50:32 PM  
Another lost to the great Video.
 
2020-05-28 8:13:55 PM  
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2020-05-28 8:24:17 PM  

born_yesterday: D"ecay of magnetic fields in magnetars powers the emission of high-energy electromagnetic radiation, for instance, in the form of X-rays or radio waves."

So...across the electromagnetic spectrum, or only at the extremes?  Ever as visible light?


Pretty much anything they do is an extremely energetic event but a few have been in the optical range.

3.3.Temporal Properties of Low-Frequency Emission
Although every known magnetar has been detected as an X-ray pulsar, small handfuls have had pulsations detected in the optical and radio bands. Optical pulsations have been detected in just three magnetars (Kern & Martin 2002; Dhillon et al. 2005, 2009, 2011). The optical pulses seen thus far are comparably broad and similar to the corresponding X-ray pulse profile, at least within the limited optical statistics. Importantly, all are detected with high pulsed fractions ranging from 20% to 50%, in one case higher than that in X-rays (Dhillon et al. 2011). This is strongly suggestive of a magnetospheric origin (see Section 5). Only three have had optical pulsations detected, and six more have shown optical and/or IR emission not yet seen to pulse (Table 1). The overall picture of the relationship of the IR emission to the X-rays remains unclear. In several cases, clear IR enhancements have been noted at the time of outbursts, often with the IR correlated with the X-rays (Rea et al. 2004, Tam et al. 2004, Israel et al. 2005a). However, in some cases, no correlation has been seen (Durant & van Kerkwijk 2006, Tam et al. 2008, Testa et al. 2008, Wang et al. 2008).

https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/full​/10.1146/annurev-astro-081915-023329
 
2020-05-29 9:30:45 AM  
my lower horn is tingling
 
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