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(Twitter)   Sit down and don't pass out for this trippy video of the day: Cool timelapse footage shows the Milky Way "spinning in the clear sky as the lake below reflects the shining stars in its still waters." DUDE   (twitter.com) divider line
    More: Cool, shot  
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2140 clicks; posted to Geek » on 25 May 2020 at 9:05 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-05-25 4:32:44 PM  
Original Tweet:

 
2020-05-25 5:13:42 PM  
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It's like when you're a kid. The first time they tell you that the world's turning and you just can't quite believe it 'cause everything looks like it's standing still... I can feel it: the turn of the Earth. The ground beneath our feet is spinning at 1,000 miles an hour and the entire planet is hurtling around the sun at 67,000 miles an hour, and I can feel it. We're falling through space, you and me, clinging to the skin of this tiny little world, and if we let go...
 
2020-05-25 5:19:57 PM  
They realize it's the world that's turning, right? Unless they have a time-lapse of 250,000 years.
 
2020-05-25 5:29:13 PM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: They realize it's the world that's turning, right? Unless they have a time-lapse of 250,000 years.


Your poetic license has been suspended.

;-)
 
2020-05-25 5:53:07 PM  
Fraternity of Man - "Don't Bogart Me"
Youtube 8f-BUt0Eywg
 
2020-05-25 5:54:53 PM  
My God... It's full of stars...
 
2020-05-25 7:00:15 PM  
Whenever I spend any time out watching the stars, I soon lose all sense of importance. We are but small  creatures whose existence will never matter to the vastness of space. We are but dust.
 
2020-05-25 9:36:43 PM  
Pretty cool.

Anyone else want our galaxy to have a different name than "the Milky Way" though? Its kinda stupid. I mean our nearest galactic neighbor is Andromeda, that's pretty cool name. There's also some descriptive ones (Whirlpool Galaxy) or ones named after their location in the galactic catalog (Messier 81). The best ones are named after their location in a given constellation (Canis Major Overdensity/Canis Major Dwarf Galaxy for example).

I think the most metal name has got to be "Cosmos Redshift 7".  That sounds like a place you DON'T want to mess with.
 
2020-05-25 9:43:33 PM  
Honest question:

Is the night sky really that bright and glorious in remote places or is the luminosity dramatically enhanced by the time lapse effect?

I've lived in the city my whole life and though I've traveled, its always by plane to other large cities. The last time I spent any time farther out than a suburb was when I was a kid. I have some vague memories of seeing the Milky Way from a cabin but it was nothing like that.
 
2020-05-25 9:44:34 PM  
i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2020-05-25 9:56:41 PM  

RyansPrivates: Anyone else want our galaxy to have a different name than "the Milky Way" though?


Here are a couple of options.
 
2020-05-25 10:04:29 PM  

little red bot: Honest question:

Is the night sky really that bright and glorious in remote places or is the luminosity dramatically enhanced by the time lapse effect?

I've lived in the city my whole life and though I've traveled, its always by plane to other large cities. The last time I spent any time farther out than a suburb was when I was a kid. I have some vague memories of seeing the Milky Way from a cabin but it was nothing like that.


It's enhanced by the camera, particularly the colors.  But if you're in a dark location with dark adapted vision it's pretty impactful.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-25 10:17:08 PM  

Short Victoria's War: little red bot: Honest question:

Is the night sky really that bright and glorious in remote places or is the luminosity dramatically enhanced by the time lapse effect?

I've lived in the city my whole life and though I've traveled, its always by plane to other large cities. The last time I spent any time farther out than a suburb was when I was a kid. I have some vague memories of seeing the Milky Way from a cabin but it was nothing like that.

It's enhanced by the camera, particularly the colors.  But if you're in a dark location with dark adapted vision it's pretty impactful.

[Fark user image 819x1024]


Thank you. The pic on the left is pretty inline with my childhood memories.
 
2020-05-25 10:19:53 PM  

RyansPrivates: Pretty cool.

Anyone else want our galaxy to have a different name than "the Milky Way" though? Its kinda stupid. I mean our nearest galactic neighbor is Andromeda, that's pretty cool name. There's also some descriptive ones (Whirlpool Galaxy) or ones named after their location in the galactic catalog (Messier 81). The best ones are named after their location in a given constellation (Canis Major Overdensity/Canis Major Dwarf Galaxy for example).

I think the most metal name has got to be "Cosmos Redshift 7".  That sounds like a place you DON'T want to mess with.


GALAXIA 1. Book it, done.
 
2020-05-25 10:29:36 PM  
But how can we sleep when the beds are burning?
 
2020-05-25 10:37:58 PM  

little red bot: Honest question:

Is the night sky really that bright and glorious in remote places or is the luminosity dramatically enhanced by the time lapse effect?

I've lived in the city my whole life and though I've traveled, its always by plane to other large cities. The last time I spent any time farther out than a suburb was when I was a kid. I have some vague memories of seeing the Milky Way from a cabin but it was nothing like that.


I've seen the night sky from western New Mexico to central Oregon to eastern Mongolia to Lake Titicaca to West Papua to Kosrae to northern Queensland to the Arnavon Islands. And from aircraft from all over North America, South America, Asia, and all over the Pacific. And both the Perseids and the Leonids from various locations.

I never get tired of it. It's real and it's spectacular.
 
2020-05-25 10:42:49 PM  

little red bot: Honest question:

Is the night sky really that bright and glorious in remote places or is the luminosity dramatically enhanced by the time lapse effect?

I've lived in the city my whole life and though I've traveled, its always by plane to other large cities. The last time I spent any time farther out than a suburb was when I was a kid. I have some vague memories of seeing the Milky Way from a cabin but it was nothing like that.


The first time I experienced a truly dark sky (North Central BC) it was incredibly humbling.  There are so many stars that it is overwhelming. And the milky way looks like you can touch it.
Northern lights are farking eerie in places that have no light pollution.

The only place I have experienced truly dark skies was in the nothingness east of Babine lake in BC.

It is seriously a bucket list worthy experience to see the dark skies in a truly remote part of the world.
 
2020-05-25 10:48:38 PM  

Weird Hal: ecmoRandomNumbers: They realize it's the world that's turning, right? Unless they have a time-lapse of 250,000 years.

Your poetic license has been suspended.

;-)


The soul of a Vogon poet.
 
2020-05-25 10:54:17 PM  
Dark Eagle - May 25-26, 2017 - Panning Overnight Milky Way Time Lapse
Youtube vv2v5XuKKMU


From the channel of a good friend and observing compadre of mine. He's since been diagnosed with ALS.

This is a site 45 minutes southeast of Eugene, OR. One of our frequent observing spots, although the road is considerably treacherous at night (and by day, too, actually).
 
2020-05-25 11:00:56 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-25 11:02:45 PM  

GypsyJoker: [iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/vv2v5XuK​KMU?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3​A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&start=0&enablejsap​i=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&​widgetid=1]

From the channel of a good friend and observing compadre of mine. He's since been diagnosed with ALS.

This is a site 45 minutes southeast of Eugene, OR. One of our frequent observing spots, although the road is considerably treacherous at night (and by day, too, actually).


Very cool.  So many meteors (and some satellites I assume, and the ISS).
 
2020-05-25 11:05:19 PM  

Weird Hal: ecmoRandomNumbers: They realize it's the world that's turning, right? Unless they have a time-lapse of 250,000 years.

Your poetic license has been suspended.

;-)


Pray that there's intelligent life somewhere up in space cause there's bugger all down here on Earth.
 
2020-05-25 11:05:41 PM  
Haven't seen the Milky Way in years. Thanks, advertising.
 
2020-05-25 11:07:29 PM  

Short Victoria's War: GypsyJoker: [iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/vv2v5XuK​KMU?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3​A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&start=0&enablejsap​i=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&​widgetid=1]

From the channel of a good friend and observing compadre of mine. He's since been diagnosed with ALS.

This is a site 45 minutes southeast of Eugene, OR. One of our frequent observing spots, although the road is considerably treacherous at night (and by day, too, actually).

Very cool.  So many meteors (and some satellites I assume, and the ISS).


Yeah, satellites, airplanes, meteors, and the ISS. Maybe an Iridium flare (I know a couple of his videos have flares in them). The Iridiums are pretty much a thing of the past, though.
 
2020-05-25 11:30:45 PM  

edmo: Whenever I spend any time out watching the stars, I soon lose all sense of importance. We are but small  creatures whose existence will never matter to the vastness of space. We are but dust.


Word. Behold the majesty of the universe.
 
2020-05-25 11:44:39 PM  

Weird Hal: [Fark user image image 600x300]

It's like when you're a kid. The first time they tell you that the world's turning and you just can't quite believe it 'cause everything looks like it's standing still... I can feel it: the turn of the Earth. The ground beneath our feet is spinning at 1,000 miles an hour and the entire planet is hurtling around the sun at 67,000 miles an hour, and I can feel it. We're falling through space, you and me, clinging to the skin of this tiny little world, and if we let go...


One of my top five Nine moments.
 
2020-05-25 11:47:46 PM  
i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2020-05-25 11:51:50 PM  
If you enjoy timelapse films, take a look at some of the stuff from Timestorm Films: https://www.youtube.com/channe​l/UCqOec​sBLULnuUtls0tISTCw

(I didn't know they were up to 8k / 60fps now... insane. I used some of their 4k works as early demos when I bought the 4k OLED TV... amazing.)

Their 10 year celebration video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?​v=hfD2vP​N-3E0

(Reminds me more than a little bit of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koya​anis​qatsi which I also recommend in either direction...)
 
2020-05-26 12:20:08 AM  
Son, that's the Milky Way. And over there, that's Mars. Next to it, uh, dang, can't remember the name, whatchamacallit, uh, Zagnut. That's it. And Zagnut was a part of Oreo's belt. Hey, weird thought, you getting hungry?

/got nuthin
//cool find subby
 
2020-05-26 12:40:39 AM  

SloppyFrenchKisser: [i.pinimg.com image 850x786]


"...being pushed by the Local Void..."

??????????????????????????????

Gravity don't work like that.

Matter attracts matter, and matter clumping is what forms the voids.
 
2020-05-26 12:42:38 AM  
what really blows my mind. in the dark space in between each star that looks totally empty. 10000 galaxies.

Fark user imageView Full Size



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hubble_​U​ltra-Deep_Field
 
2020-05-26 12:55:38 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size

I took this 2 years ago in Maryhill, WA.
 
2020-05-26 1:35:37 AM  

LouisZepher: [i.pinimg.com image 564x1001]


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-26 1:48:50 AM  
I see water that still and all I think is "Damn, there's gonna be a lot of mosquitos."
 
2020-05-26 2:07:45 AM  

RyansPrivates: Anyone else want our galaxy to have a different name than "the Milky Way" though?


It comes from Latin. The Romans called it the via galactica -- the Road of Milk, because that's what it looks like.

That is also where we get the word galaxy from ie: lacte, milk. So we are essentially calling all large groupings of stars in the universe milky objects.
 
2020-05-26 2:40:55 AM  

RyansPrivates: Pretty cool.

Anyone else want our galaxy to have a different name than "the Milky Way" though? Its kinda stupid. I mean our nearest galactic neighbor is Andromeda, that's pretty cool name. There's also some descriptive ones (Whirlpool Galaxy) or ones named after their location in the galactic catalog (Messier 81). The best ones are named after their location in a given constellation (Canis Major Overdensity/Canis Major Dwarf Galaxy for example).

I think the most metal name has got to be "Cosmos Redshift 7".  That sounds like a place you DON'T want to mess with.


I think we should start small and get the name of our moon changed from the Moon.

"Hey, what do you call your planet?"
"Dirt."
 
2020-05-26 4:45:05 AM  
Somewhat related: The moon is actually pretty fast.  If you're lucky enough to have a clear night, a bright moon, and some power lines or winter tree branches to make a grid or graduation, you can actually see it moving and kind of get a feel for how big and fast it is.
 
2020-05-26 8:54:50 AM  

RyansPrivates: Pretty cool.

Anyone else want our galaxy to have a different name than "the Milky Way" though? Its kinda stupid. I mean our nearest galactic neighbor is Andromeda, that's pretty cool name. There's also some descriptive ones (Whirlpool Galaxy) or ones named after their location in the galactic catalog (Messier 81). The best ones are named after their location in a given constellation (Canis Major Overdensity/Canis Major Dwarf Galaxy for example).

I think the most metal name has got to be "Cosmos Redshift 7".  That sounds like a place you DON'T want to mess with.


FWIW, the Chinese name for the Milky Way translates to "Silver River".
 
2020-05-26 10:52:21 AM  

RyansPrivates: Pretty cool.

Anyone else want our galaxy to have a different name than "the Milky Way" though? Its kinda stupid. I mean our nearest galactic neighbor is Andromeda, that's pretty cool name. There's also some descriptive ones (Whirlpool Galaxy) or ones named after their location in the galactic catalog (Messier 81). The best ones are named after their location in a given constellation (Canis Major Overdensity/Canis Major Dwarf Galaxy for example).

I think the most metal name has got to be "Cosmos Redshift 7".  That sounds like a place you DON'T want to mess with.


Short answer:  Yes

Long answer:  No, because one of the three shiatty corporations that own everything would buy the naming rights, and I'd rather not live in the Google Galaxy, thank you.
 
2020-05-26 12:03:25 PM  

Ishkur: RyansPrivates: Anyone else want our galaxy to have a different name than "the Milky Way" though?

It comes from Latin. The Romans called it the via galactica -- the Road of Milk, because that's what it looks like.

That is also where we get the word galaxy from ie: lacte, milk. So we are essentially calling all large groupings of stars in the universe milky objects.


It's named after Hera's spray of titty milk when baby Hercules was torn suckling from her breast.
 
2020-05-26 12:22:02 PM  
For those opposed to geocentric perspective:

Earth's Rotation Visualized in a Timelapse of the Milky Way Galaxy - 4K
Youtube 1zJ9FnQXmJI
 
2020-05-26 12:44:02 PM  

Ishkur: RyansPrivates: Anyone else want our galaxy to have a different name than "the Milky Way" though?

It comes from Latin. The Romans called it the via galactica -- the Road of Milk, because that's what it looks like.

That is also where we get the word galaxy from ie: lacte, milk. So we are essentially calling all large groupings of stars in the universe milky objects.



So the name of our galaxy translates to "The Milky Way Road of Milk" -- that's even worse.
 
2020-05-26 2:50:51 PM  

RyansPrivates: So the name of our galaxy translates to "The Milky Way Road of Milk" -- that's even worse.


Rather: The Milky Way Milk.

And M31 is the Andromeda Milk.
 
2020-05-26 4:01:59 PM  

Ishkur: RyansPrivates: Anyone else want our galaxy to have a different name than "the Milky Way" though?

It comes from Latin. The Romans called it the via galactica -- the Road of Milk, because that's what it looks like.

That is also where we get the word galaxy from ie: lacte, milk. So we are essentially calling all large groupings of stars in the universe milky objects.


That's neat. I learned something new-to-me, so thank-you.
 
2020-05-26 7:44:20 PM  
In another thread, someone asked if there was any point to twitter.  For some reason, people insist on putting cool stuff like this on it and not elsewhere.
 
2020-05-26 7:48:24 PM  

hogans: RyansPrivates: Anyone else want our galaxy to have a different name than "the Milky Way" though?

Here are a couple of options.


In China it was called the Celestial River.  Unfortunately, that is also the name of a constellation in western folklore.
 
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