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(ABC7 San Francisco)   Mechanical Museum and SS Jeremiah O'Brien survive 4-alarm blaze as San Francisco's Pier 45 briefly becomes the world's fastest producer of smoked fish and roast crab legs   (abc7news.com) divider line
    More: Scary, World War II, San Francisco, San Francisco Bay Area, Liberty ship, SAN FRANCISCO, Pier, Wharf, Dock  
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1981 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 May 2020 at 5:50 PM (9 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



48 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-05-23 5:53:38 PM  
Tourists, residents and swimmers are asked to stay away from the area.

Why in God's name would anyone swim between piers 45 and 39?!
 
2020-05-23 5:58:30 PM  
That museum is priceless. Parking in that area is like $900 an hour, but still worth the visit.

While you're in the city, also check out Free Gold Watch in the lower Haight. 40+ pinball machines and a totally chill atmosphere. Brown bags encouraged.
 
2020-05-23 6:16:11 PM  
I'll be honest, crabmeat can give me a reaction anywhere between just dry skin to eczema so bad I scratch until I bleed.
But considering today's the last day of fasting, I'm hungry enough to eat some.
 
2020-05-23 6:16:40 PM  

phishrace: That museum is priceless. Parking in that area is like $900 an hour, but still worth the visit.


Whenever I'm in San Francisco I try to go there. The Exploratorium down the Embarcardero is also a pretty cool place to check out.
 
2020-05-23 6:26:02 PM  
Wasn't the USS Pampanito submarine parked right in front of O'Brien
 
2020-05-23 6:32:25 PM  
...Last I heard Pampanito and O'Brien were both intact, though they're gonna need some cleanup.
 
2020-05-23 6:32:45 PM  

Rev Rick White: Wasn't the USS Pampanito submarine parked right in front of O'Brien


I believe it still is. But, the O'Brien always gets more attention and press for some reason I have yet to figure out.

Glad the Museum and ships are okay. Happy that the restaurants are okay; especially Scoma's.
 
2020-05-23 6:33:55 PM  
Too bad they couldn't save Pier 1...
 
2020-05-23 6:41:15 PM  

BigNumber12: Tourists, residents and swimmers are asked to stay away from the area.

Why in God's name would anyone swim between piers 45 and 39?!


No kidding.  Even ignoring all the boat traffic and water pollution, the territorial sea lions in the area would be scary.

CSB:  I was kayaking in Morro Bay, CA (central coast of CA).  My kayak has a deployable  pedal-driven propeller.  But much of Morro Bay is very shallow.  I need only 18" of water to use the propeller, but I would often bottom out.  Morro Bay has two small wooden docks moored in the center of the bay, and they are covered in sea lions, all playing King of the Hill with each other when they're not sunbathing.  Morro Bay is also a working bay.  There is fishing (and other working) boat traffic throughout the areas deep enough to handle them.  And while you can kayak anywhere in the bay, it's best to stay out of the boat traffic lanes.  So when passing by the moored sea lions' docks, in order to stay out of the boat lanes, you end up going very close to shore, very shallow water.

I had taken a date up there, and we were going around the bay, enjoying the sights.  Obviously, you keep some distance between you and the sea lions' Floating Bastion of Smelliness.  (I don't know how many of you have seen a sea lion up close, but they have huge teeth and will use them, just to "send a message" about territory).  I was several dozen yards away from the Floating Bastion of Smelliness when my propeller drive bottomed out.

I opened the access port, and was trying to rotate the propeller assembly back up into the hull of the kayak, and didn't notice that the current was moving me directly to their moored docks.  Something was jammed in the propeller assembly, and I was still fighting with it, when all of the sudden, I noticed that constant cacophony of sea lion barking go silent at all once.  I turn to look behind me and see that I'm about 20 feet away from their dock, and all of them suddenly turned their heads at once right at me (it was creepy, like some kind of Valley of the Dolls looking scene).  I hurriedly increase my efforts to get my propeller assembly back up inside the hull.  Moments later, when I've drifted to without about 10 feet of their dock, one of the biggest sea lions (who's easily bigger than me) dives into the water and "thumps" the underside of my kayak.  Big, loud, resounding, "THUMP!"

Message received!  And that was all the encouragement I needed.  I immediately abandoned trying to stow the propeller, grabbed my paddle, and got the hell away from there as quickly as I could.  Luckily, all parties seemed fine with that solution and no further escalation was necessary.

My heart still races every time I pass by those docks.  I swear they all remember me.
 
2020-05-23 6:50:04 PM  

Space Squid: BigNumber12: Tourists, residents and swimmers are asked to stay away from the area.

Why in God's name would anyone swim between piers 45 and 39?!

No kidding.  Even ignoring all the boat traffic and water pollution, the territorial sea lions in the area would be scary.

CSB:  I was kayaking in Morro Bay, CA (central coast of CA).  My kayak has a deployable  pedal-driven propeller.  But much of Morro Bay is very shallow.  I need only 18" of water to use the propeller, but I would often bottom out.  Morro Bay has two small wooden docks moored in the center of the bay, and they are covered in sea lions, all playing King of the Hill with each other when they're not sunbathing.  Morro Bay is also a working bay.  There is fishing (and other working) boat traffic throughout the areas deep enough to handle them.  And while you can kayak anywhere in the bay, it's best to stay out of the boat traffic lanes.  So when passing by the moored sea lions' docks, in order to stay out of the boat lanes, you end up going very close to shore, very shallow water.

I had taken a date up there, and we were going around the bay, enjoying the sights.  Obviously, you keep some distance between you and the sea lions' Floating Bastion of Smelliness.  (I don't know how many of you have seen a sea lion up close, but they have huge teeth and will use them, just to "send a message" about territory).  I was several dozen yards away from the Floating Bastion of Smelliness when my propeller drive bottomed out.

I opened the access port, and was trying to rotate the propeller assembly back up into the hull of the kayak, and didn't notice that the current was moving me directly to their moored docks.  Something was jammed in the propeller assembly, and I was still fighting with it, when all of the sudden, I noticed that constant cacophony of sea lion barking go silent at all once.  I turn to look behind me and see that I'm about 20 feet away from their dock, and all of them suddenly turned their heads at once right at me (it was creepy, like some kind of Valley of the Dolls looking scene).  I hurriedly increase my efforts to get my propeller assembly back up inside the hull.  Moments later, when I've drifted to without about 10 feet of their dock, one of the biggest sea lions (who's easily bigger than me) dives into the water and "thumps" the underside of my kayak.  Big, loud, resounding, "THUMP!"

Message received!  And that was all the encouragement I needed.  I immediately abandoned trying to stow the propeller, grabbed my paddle, and got the hell away from there as quickly as I could.  Luckily, all parties seemed fine with that solution and no further escalation was necessary.

My heart still races every time I pass by those docks.  I swear they all remember me.


That's an actual CSB. Have been through Morro - that whole stretch around SLO is beautiful - but never out on the water.

Seals of all sorts have a very Cartoon/Disney-fied reputation, but they're absolutely nothing to fark with - even beyond the ones with 'fierce' reputations like Elephant and Leopard. They're hunters, they're competitive/defensive, and they're so much more capable in their home environment than we are.
 
2020-05-23 7:04:03 PM  
Museé Mechanique is one of my favorite go-tos in SF. Glad they saved it.
 
2020-05-23 8:07:41 PM  

RoyFokker'sGhost: Rev Rick White: Wasn't the USS Pampanito submarine parked right in front of O'Brien

I believe it still is. But, the O'Brien always gets more attention and press for some reason I have yet to figure out.

Glad the Museum and ships are okay. Happy that the restaurants are okay; especially Scoma's.


Because it was a merchant marine ship and not owned by the Navy, the O'Brien can move and operate under its own power (Navy rules specifically state that any ship they loan to a museum has to be inoperable).  If your ship can take people on tours, it's going to have significantly more opportunities for publicity.

Heck, even being able to host parties and other functions aboard helps immensely.  You can't really do that on a museum sub.
 
2020-05-23 8:31:40 PM  

BigNumber12: Tourists, residents and swimmers are asked to stay away from the area.

Why in God's name would anyone swim between piers 45 and 39?!


Lots of swimmers in aquatic park, just a couple piers over. Probably warning them not to swim over to look.
 
2020-05-23 8:37:58 PM  

UNC_Samurai: RoyFokker'sGhost: Rev Rick White: Wasn't the USS Pampanito submarine parked right in front of O'Brien

I believe it still is. But, the O'Brien always gets more attention and press for some reason I have yet to figure out.

Glad the Museum and ships are okay. Happy that the restaurants are okay; especially Scoma's.

Because it was a merchant marine ship and not owned by the Navy, the O'Brien can move and operate under its own power (Navy rules specifically state that any ship they loan to a museum has to be inoperable).  If your ship can take people on tours, it's going to have significantly more opportunities for publicity.

Heck, even being able to host parties and other functions aboard helps immensely.  You can't really do that on a museum sub.


The Pampanito is no longer owned by the US Navy. And it is no longer a "USS" either. It and the O'Brian are owned and operated by the San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park which has no official ties to the USN regarding it's operation. The USN might help out with some technical aspects regarding that class of boat and even helping out with the PR aspects of running it as a tourist attraction.

The only Museum ship that I know of that is wholly owned and operated by the USN is The Historic Ship Nautilus (SSN 571) located at the Submarine Force Library and Museum in Groton CT. Some might argue that the USS Constitution is a museum ship but it is not as it is still commissioned and can get underway on it's own (sail) power. The Nautilus is welded (literally) to the pier with everything belowdeck decommissioned. She couldn't get underway without a crane, a few welders, a few divers and a few tugboats and even then she would be not be sea worthy in any way shape or form. Even a slight chop in the Thames might do her in while being towed to EB, just a few miles downriver from the museum.

The Pompanito is in the same boat (heh) in that regard as her topside has a huge hole cut through the pressure hull to allow for tourists to get in and out without getting hurt so no bay cruises for her either.
 
2020-05-23 8:42:17 PM  
Was in San Francisco about a decade ago and had to choose between the Pampanito and the O'Brien to visit (only had time for one).   The Pampanito won.  As a land locked Canadian I never get to see anything as cool as that.

Well, the Lancaster that flies out of Hamilton is fantastic to see and hear.
 
2020-05-23 8:54:29 PM  

wax_on: BigNumber12: Tourists, residents and swimmers are asked to stay away from the area.

Why in God's name would anyone swim between piers 45 and 39?!

Lots of swimmers in aquatic park, just a couple piers over. Probably warning them not to swim over to look.


Good point. Eesh.
 
2020-05-23 8:54:30 PM  

Radioactive Ass: UNC_Samurai: RoyFokker'sGhost: Rev Rick White: Wasn't the USS Pampanito submarine parked right in front of O'Brien

I believe it still is. But, the O'Brien always gets more attention and press for some reason I have yet to figure out.

Glad the Museum and ships are okay. Happy that the restaurants are okay; especially Scoma's.

Because it was a merchant marine ship and not owned by the Navy, the O'Brien can move and operate under its own power (Navy rules specifically state that any ship they loan to a museum has to be inoperable).  If your ship can take people on tours, it's going to have significantly more opportunities for publicity.

Heck, even being able to host parties and other functions aboard helps immensely.  You can't really do that on a museum sub.

The Pampanito is no longer owned by the US Navy. And it is no longer a "USS" either. It and the O'Brian are owned and operated by the San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park which has no official ties to the USN regarding it's operation. The USN might help out with some technical aspects regarding that class of boat and even helping out with the PR aspects of running it as a tourist attraction.

The only Museum ship that I know of that is wholly owned and operated by the USN is The Historic Ship Nautilus (SSN 571) located at the Submarine Force Library and Museum in Groton CT. Some might argue that the USS Constitution is a museum ship but it is not as it is still commissioned and can get underway on it's own (sail) power. The Nautilus is welded (literally) to the pier with everything belowdeck decommissioned. She couldn't get underway without a crane, a few welders, a few divers and a few tugboats and even then she would be not be sea worthy in any way shape or form. Even a slight chop in the Thames might do her in while being towed to EB, just a few miles downriver from the museum.

The Pompanito is in the same boat (heh) in that regard as her topside has a huge hole cut through the pressure hull to allow for tourists to get in and out without getting hurt so no bay cruises for her either.


All US Navy vessels serving as ship museums are still owned by the Navy and are administered through the Inactive Ships Office's Ship Donation Program.  The museums have a contract that stipulates levels of maintenance and curation.  If the museum organization fails to meet those standards, the Navy will rescind their donation.

/They threatened to do that to Independence Seaport about a decade ago when the Olympia's hull was disintegrating and the museum was having trouble raising enough money for repairs.
 
2020-05-23 9:20:26 PM  
I'm just glad Laughing Sal is okay.
 
2020-05-23 9:35:38 PM  

phishrace: Parking in that area is like $900 an hour, but still worth the visit.


Nobody parks in San Francisco, all the spaces are full.
 
2020-05-23 10:10:14 PM  
Too bad they couldn't save Pier 1...

har har
 
2020-05-23 10:17:10 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size

Fark user imageView Full Size


/stolen from some other website.
 
2020-05-23 10:32:06 PM  
BigNumber12: Seals of all sorts have a very Cartoon/Disney-fied reputation, but they're absolutely nothing to fark with 6

Heh, "Disney-fied" is a really good way to put it!  Yeah, they look all cute and cuddly, especially having grown up around Sea-World in the 80s and 90s, and having seen all the comedy shows they trained them to do.

But when you see their teeth....  Let me tell you, you've never seen a dog bare its teeth and seen chompers like these.  There's a reason they're called sea lions.  That's the closest approximation to their dentition.  Large and sharp!

On another trip to Port of San Luis Obispo, around Avila Beach, I was warned, "Stay away from the pier.  That's the sea lions' territory, and they get cranky when we invade it."

If you're ever looking to try out kayaking (around the central coast of CA), Morro Bay is great place to try out (and they have rentals).  It's gorgeous, and very easy to paddle.  Enclosed, so no strong currents (occasionally strong winds).  And most of it is shallow enough to stand up in if you flip your boat.  All mud bottom, no coral.  There's a sea otter troupe of about 30 that are freaking adorable.  A bird sanctuary right at the water.  A campground across the street.  Restaurants right on the water.  And plenty of beaches.  Plus, I like checking out the sailboats that are docked at the marina and moored in the deeper area of the bay.  And there is a ramp just for kayakers (it has bollards at the top of the ramp to prevent people from launching full boats from it).

I do not recommend Port San Luis.  A fully exposed, deep, bay with very strong currents, and almost always strong winds.  Which is a shame, because it's beautiful too.  But maybe enjoy that one from the land.

/sorry, for getting off topic from the article
 
2020-05-23 10:39:26 PM  

Space Squid: /sorry, for getting off topic from the article


Totally appreciate the notes! We have good friends in Pacific Grove, so we'll be driving around the Central Coast... whenever travel makes sense again.
 
2020-05-23 10:55:45 PM  

BigNumber12: Tourists, residents and swimmers are asked to stay away from the area.

Why in God's name would anyone swim between piers 45 and 39?!


Ever seen pier 42? It is incredible!
 
2020-05-23 11:07:01 PM  

Mock26: BigNumber12: Tourists, residents and swimmers are asked to stay away from the area.

Why in God's name would anyone swim between piers 45 and 39?!

Ever seen pier 42? It is incredible!


I think we misplaced it beneath a ballpark.
 
2020-05-23 11:13:19 PM  

germ78: phishrace: That museum is priceless. Parking in that area is like $900 an hour, but still worth the visit.

Whenever I'm in San Francisco I try to go there. The Exploratorium down the Embarcardero is also a pretty cool place to check out.


I've not been to this museum, but I go to the Exploratorium every decade or so... Just a wonderful place, and I seem to turn 10 years old every time I walk in the door.
I'll put this place on my list for the next time I head to the city.

RoyFokker'sGhost: I believe it still is. But, the O'Brien always gets more attention and press for some reason I have yet to figure out.


I suspect it has to do with the fact that the O'Brien is still a functioning ship., and maybe because some people would find the sub a little claustrophobic and hard to manage.
 
2020-05-23 11:37:19 PM  

Space Squid: BigNumber12: Tourists, residents and swimmers are asked to stay away from the area.

Why in God's name would anyone swim between piers 45 and 39?!

No kidding.  Even ignoring all the boat traffic and water pollution, the territorial sea lions in the area would be scary.

CSB:  I was kayaking in Morro Bay, CA (central coast of CA).  My kayak has a deployable  pedal-driven propeller.  But much of Morro Bay is very shallow.  I need only 18" of water to use the propeller, but I would often bottom out.  Morro Bay has two small wooden docks moored in the center of the bay, and they are covered in sea lions, all playing King of the Hill with each other when they're not sunbathing.  Morro Bay is also a working bay.  There is fishing (and other working) boat traffic throughout the areas deep enough to handle them.  And while you can kayak anywhere in the bay, it's best to stay out of the boat traffic lanes.  So when passing by the moored sea lions' docks, in order to stay out of the boat lanes, you end up going very close to shore, very shallow water.

I had taken a date up there, and we were going around the bay, enjoying the sights.  Obviously, you keep some distance between you and the sea lions' Floating Bastion of Smelliness.  (I don't know how many of you have seen a sea lion up close, but they have huge teeth and will use them, just to "send a message" about territory).  I was several dozen yards away from the Floating Bastion of Smelliness when my propeller drive bottomed out.

I opened the access port, and was trying to rotate the propeller assembly back up into the hull of the kayak, and didn't notice that the current was moving me directly to their moored docks.  Something was jammed in the propeller assembly, and I was still fighting with it, when all of the sudden, I noticed that constant cacophony of sea lion barking go silent at all once.  I turn to look behind me and see that I'm about 20 feet away from their dock, and all of them suddenly turned their heads at once right at me (it was creepy, like some kind of Valley of the Dolls looking scene).  I hurriedly increase my efforts to get my propeller assembly back up inside the hull.  Moments later, when I've drifted to without about 10 feet of their dock, one of the biggest sea lions (who's easily bigger than me) dives into the water and "thumps" the underside of my kayak.  Big, loud, resounding, "THUMP!"

Message received!  And that was all the encouragement I needed.  I immediately abandoned trying to stow the propeller, grabbed my paddle, and got the hell away from there as quickly as I could.  Luckily, all parties seemed fine with that solution and no further escalation was necessary.

My heart still races every time I pass by those docks.  I swear they all remember me.


So...no sex?
 
2020-05-23 11:37:45 PM  

Space Squid: the territorial sea lions in the area would be scary.


I had a sea lion sneak up on me at 60' when I was diving off of Catalina. I turned around, and there was this beast not 10 feet away just checking me out. I tried to swallow my regulator, spit it out and crap my wet suit all at the same time, but failed in every regard. This bastard was BIG!

Space Squid: (I don't know how many of you have seen a sea lion up close, but they have huge teeth and will use them, just to "send a message" about territory)


Funny you should mention that... yes, I have, because it made a point of showing me. It was sort of like this:

Fark user imageView Full Size


It quickly became clear that it was just curious and no threat, but it was also obvious that it could have ruined my day without any effort what so ever. I have never felt so vulnerable and helpless before, or since and that includes when the park rangers set a bear loose in the campground I was staying at.
Yes, seriously. A full grown 400+lb bear... the cub I saw in the parking lot earlier that day had me more worried, mainly because I didn't know where momma was.

Anyway, an average sea lion can easily weigh 5-600lbs, hold it's breath for 10 minutes, and tear you a new asshole if it so chose. Thankfully that one chose not to, did a graceful flip, barrel roll, flipper stroke and moved on out of sight.

So yeah, I get what you are saying...
 
2020-05-23 11:55:33 PM  

Prof. Frink: So...no sex?


Well....  None I can talk about on newFark.

/Hey, I said I went back, right?
 
2020-05-24 12:06:04 AM  

Space Squid: Prof. Frink: So...no sex?

Well....  None I can talk about on newFark.

/Hey, I said I went back, right?


I meant with the sea lions.
 
2020-05-24 12:21:38 AM  
Percise1: I had a sea lion sneak up on me at 60' when I was diving off of Catalina. I turned around, and there was this beast not 10 feet away just checking me out. I tried to swallow my regulator, spit it out and crap my wet suit all at the same time, but failed in every regard. This bastard was BIG!

Hot Damn!  Yeah, no.  Instant heart attack, I would have been done right then.

Back in 2010, I took a family trip to Hawaii, couple weeks, island hopped, snorkeled every beach we could find, and every charter boat we could get tickets on.  It was my first time snorkeling anything but kiddy beaches.  I asked if we were going to see sharks (which I wanted to), they said most likely.  Will also see eels (which I did NOT want to.  I have an eel story as well...)  So two weeks in the water, I didn't see a single shark.  Was disappointed.

My last day, literally going to be on the plane home in about five hours, and we're doing our last dive.  It's out to sea, from a boat, no land in sight, on a coral head.  It was disappointing, as it was fairly deep water, at least 40-50'.  Most of it covered in a carpet of coral five feet with, with oddly distinct canyons about six feet wide, displaying the sandy bottom.  And I spot a shark!  Now, I learned from our first dive, to not surface and shout, "Hey I see a shark", like one of my relatives did, creating a drowning stampede of people trying to get back on the boat all at once.  (And it turned out to just be a long fish that was vaguely shark-shaped.)  We were told at the beginning of the trip, not to worry about the sharks, they don't bother people as long as you don't get too close.  And they described how to tell the different kinds of sharks they have in the area.  (It's been 10 years, so I don't remember the briefing.)

Anyhow, this shark was not like what they had described.  It's wasn't a reef shark (slim, torpedo-looking).  It looked more like a bull dog.  Really beefy up front, very squat, triangular head.  Over six feet long.  Had spots (which the reef sharks didn't).  So I followed him (there wasn't anyone around me).  I was free diving down to about 30 feet, and following along, as it moved through those canyons, I assume looking for things hiding just under the sand.  I'd surface, grab some air, and head back.  (I'm a strong swimmer.)

I reached a point where I realized I couldn't see the boat anymore, so I waved goodbye to my new friend and headed back in the boat's direction.  When I reached the boat, I calmly and quietly mentioned to the captain that I saw a shark and followed it for a bit.  The captain asked me what color the tips of the shark's fins were (as apparently, there is a color that means "safe", and a color that means "I hope you don't like your appendages, cause they're coming off soon".  I don't recall the color, but I do remember the color draining from his face when I told him.  He immediately shouted, "EVERYONE OUT OF THE WATER, NOW!!!"  Turns out, that was an "eat your appendages" shark.  So glad I decided to follow him for half an hour, and got within fifteen feet of him.

That trip also spawned the Eel Story, the Whale of the Abyss Story, and resulted in one of the most awesome experiences I've ever had:  The Night Dive for the manta rays.  No description can fully capture that.

Love your sea lion story!  It's images like that that kept me from going for my scuba cert for a long time.  Sadly, now due some implanted medical equipment, I'm not allowed deeper than 12 feet (mostly because the FDA didn't think to test at different atmospheric pressures before approving).  In fact, my telling one of their representatives about that story is what made them go, "Oh shiat!  We forgot something!"  And required some updating of their paperwork (which I got when I had the device replaced a few years later).
 
2020-05-24 12:22:09 AM  

Prof. Frink: Space Squid: Prof. Frink: So...no sex?

Well....  None I can talk about on newFark.

/Hey, I said I went back, right?

I meant with the sea lions.


I understood.

/Don't judge!
 
2020-05-24 12:41:25 AM  
Let me know if anyone is interested in the eel, whale, or manta stories. They'll take a while to type up, but I try to put a funny slant on them.
 
2020-05-24 12:43:31 AM  
Twilight Farkle:

/stolen from some other website.

Fark user imageView Full Size


Even the city's disasters are beautiful.
 
2020-05-24 1:02:56 AM  

sex_and_drugs_for_ian: Twilight Farkle:

/stolen from some other website.

[Fark user image image 850x1133]

Even the city's disasters are beautiful.


Yeah, I saw that picture posted up thread, and immediately felt guilty for thinking it looked so beautiful.  Luckily, no one died or was seriously injured, so I feel a little less guilty about it.

It is a beautiful photo.
 
2020-05-24 1:08:45 AM  

Space Squid: The captain asked me what color the tips of the shark's fins were (as apparently, there is a color that means "safe", and a color that means "I hope you don't like your appendages, cause they're coming off soon". I don't recall the color, but I do remember the color draining from his face when I told him. He immediately shouted, "EVERYONE OUT OF THE WATER, NOW!!!" Turns out, that was an "eat your appendages" shark. So glad I decided to follow him for half an hour, and got within fifteen feet of him.

That trip also spawned the Eel Story, the Whale of the Abyss Story, and resulted in one of the most awesome experiences I've ever had: The Night Dive for the manta rays. No description can fully capture that.


I'm guessing a black tipped shark, looks something like this... they seem to enjoy... nibbling.

external-content.duckduckgo.comView Full Size


Night dive for manta rays sounds awesome! (I'm sure all the stories are)
But see, then I would have to talk about the time that I was lobster diving at night when my dive buddy decided to grab the tail of a sleeping shark (mistake), the time a Moray eel stole my fish I had just speared, or the electric ray I ran across in Monterey that I decided to touch (that was farking stupid).
I don't want this to seem like taller tails contest, but I'll bet they are all great to trade over beers. ;)

As for the fire in SF, I'm glad to see that apparently only 1 or 2 buildings were lost. I can't help but wonder what was in it to make it burn like that though.
 
2020-05-24 1:35:52 AM  

Percise1: Space Squid: Night dive for manta rays sounds awesome! (I'm sure all the stories are)
But see, then I would have to talk about the time that I was lobster diving at night when my dive buddy decided to grab the tail of a sleeping shark (mistake), the time a Moray eel stole my fish I had just speared, or the electric ray I ran across in Monterey that I decided to touch (that was farking stupid).
I don't want this to seem like taller tails contest, but I'll bet they are all great to trade over beers. ;)


I love good stories like those!  If you're interested in swapping more stories there's an email address listed in my Fark profile.  (It's not my primary address, so not one I check often, but I do check it at least monthly.)  Most of my stories are slanted to be funny, but I love a good story no matter the topic.

Either way, was fun chatting with you!

And, yes, the manta night dive was truly incredible.  I recommend it to anyone who makes it out to Hawaii.  They have both snorkel and scuba options, and there's charter boats for it from almost all the islands (they go to the same place).  I don't remember the cost, but whatever it was, it was worth every penny.  (To everyone else: Just be prepared to jump into the pitch black ocean in the middle of the night.  It took some serious courage-wrangling for me to do it; and I really only did because the ladies had already jumped in, so I couldn't chicken out then!  One lady jumped into the pitch black water near a ray without realizing it and brushed against her leg (with no way to see what it was right then).  If that had been me, I wouldn't have needed a ladder to get back in the boat. I would have just jumped out of the water and Jesus-ed my way back to the boat.)
 
2020-05-24 1:52:03 AM  

Space Squid: sex_and_drugs_for_ian: Twilight Farkle:

/stolen from some other website.

[Fark user image image 850x1133]

Even the city's disasters are beautiful.

Yeah, I saw that picture posted up thread, and immediately felt guilty for thinking it looked so beautiful.  Luckily, no one died or was seriously injured, so I feel a little less guilty about it.

It is a beautiful photo
.


I was just there for the first time back in mid-January (in the Before Time) checking out the sub without boarding, doing a harbor cruise and all the usual stuff.

During my stay I got a pretty comprehensive sense of the lay of the land from Santa Cruz up to Fisherman's Warf.

I only made the trip because a friend was going and he wanted a traveling companion, and since it was my slow time and I needed to scratch the bay area off my list anyway, I finally went ahead.

I didn't think it would happen, given that I'm a 50-ish center-right-curmudgeon, but I fell hard for the place and the people.

Here's the obligatory seal pic that I took from the Disney pier, with the now torched warehouses on the pier in the background, along with the museum ship:

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-24 2:07:43 AM  

sex_and_drugs_for_ian: Space Squid: sex_and_drugs_for_ian: Twilight Farkle:

/stolen from some other website.

[Fark user image image 850x1133]

Even the city's disasters are beautiful.

Yeah, I saw that picture posted up thread, and immediately felt guilty for thinking it looked so beautiful.  Luckily, no one died or was seriously injured, so I feel a little less guilty about it.

It is a beautiful photo.

I was just there for the first time back in mid-January (in the Before Time) checking out the sub without boarding, doing a harbor cruise and all the usual stuff.

During my stay I got a pretty comprehensive sense of the lay of the land from Santa Cruz up to Fisherman's Warf.

I only made the trip because a friend was going and he wanted a traveling companion, and since it was my slow time and I needed to scratch the bay area off my list anyway, I finally went ahead.

I didn't think it would happen, given that I'm a 50-ish center-right-curmudgeon, but I fell hard for the place and the people.

Here's the obligatory seal pic that I took from the Disney pier, with the now torched warehouses on the pier in the background, along with the museum ship:

[Fark user image image 850x637]


Very cool.

If you ever make it back, Alcatraz is really cool to see.  Just be prepared for serious hill climbing.  No joke.

And Ghiradelli is pretty cool for those interested in sampling different chocolate flavors.

Everyone raved that SF had the best clam chowder in sourdough bread bowls on the planet, and we tried several.  They were very good.  But my blue ribbon is awarded to the Splash Cafe in Pismo Beach, CA.  Hands down.  (Ask for extra seafood, makes it even better!)
 
2020-05-24 2:24:38 AM  

Space Squid: Everyone raved that SF had the best clam chowder in sourdough bread bowls on the planet, and we tried several. They were very good. But my blue ribbon is awarded to the Splash Cafe in Pismo Beach, CA.


I had some clam chowder while I was there too, and it was...good.

It didn't hold a candle though to the batch that I had at a sea side place that my dad took me too in Encinitas back in the mid '80s (no idea what the name of the place is/was).

It was one of those dishes that you know wont be topped for the rest of your life.
 
2020-05-24 2:33:25 AM  

sex_and_drugs_for_ian: It was one of those dishes that you know wont be topped for the rest of your life.


Ooh!  I bet!  Those are magical moments.  Been a long time since I've had a dish that I felt could never be topped.  I could use one of those.
 
2020-05-24 6:41:23 AM  
So glad the ships were saved.
My father made the Murmansk run as the communications officer on the SS Edward E Spafford. Decades later, my wife and I visited the Jeremiah O'Brien.
Of course, I called my dad from the deck... and he gave me a guided tour of the ship, from memory, without missing a thing.
"Go to the end of the hallway, and look in the door to the left... what's in there?"
"Radio equipment and a cot."
"I spent 23 hours a day in that room, son..."
 
2020-05-24 8:27:00 AM  

sex_and_drugs_for_ian: Twilight Farkle:

/stolen from some other website.

[Fark user image image 850x1133]

Even the city's disasters are beautiful.


He'll yes. Not a disaster, but I posted the pic below in another thread a while back and got a lot of thumbs up. Eye of Sauron on the Baleshorse tower on Halloween a few years ago.

s.hdnux.comView Full Size
 
2020-05-24 9:00:20 AM  

Radioactive Ass: The Pompanito is in the same boat (heh) in that regard as her topside has a huge hole cut through the pressure hull to allow for tourists to get in and out without getting hurt so no bay cruises for her either.


The only boat I know of that hasn't been butchered is the Cod SS-224.   If you can't get down through the hatches on the deck, you ain't visiting.   It's the only US submarine museum ship that could in theory be refurbished and used again.   And it's not been GUPPY'd so it's in original WWII configuration.

I know the ham radio operator that keeps it active on the air.   If you hear the callsign W8COD, that's the Cod.  He does a lot on CW (Morse code), because it's more "authentic" for the boat.

I was scheduled to visit the Nautilus back in March, but with this situation, we canceled the trip.  I've contacted them on the radio in a past Museum Ships Weekend event.

Unfortunately, it's cancelled this year:  https://www.nj2bb.org/museum/

Pity, because I and a couple other hams had been activating a local museum ship, and I always have fun doing it.
 
2020-05-24 9:02:54 AM  

Space Squid: If you ever make it back, Alcatraz is really cool to see.


I saw Alcatraz from the Presidio when I was processing out of the Army back in 1989.   It was June, and it was cold up on that hill.
 
2020-05-24 9:57:16 AM  
Thought I might see my daughter's SO in the vid but he wasn't on duty. He would have been, since his station responded.
 
2020-05-24 10:27:51 AM  
CSB, now that this thread is essentially done, as this is not a humblebrag:

My gal and I once piloted this boat (and she got to drive it in and out of McCovey Cove):

Fark user imageView Full Size


That night, I sang "Surfin U.S.A." on stage with the Beach Boys.  It was a good day.
 
2020-05-24 1:34:33 PM  

dittybopper: Radioactive Ass: The Pompanito is in the same boat (heh) in that regard as her topside has a huge hole cut through the pressure hull to allow for tourists to get in and out without getting hurt so no bay cruises for her either.

The only boat I know of that hasn't been butchered is the Cod SS-224.   If you can't get down through the hatches on the deck, you ain't visiting.   It's the only US submarine museum ship that could in theory be refurbished and used again.   And it's not been GUPPY'd so it's in original WWII configuration.


...Absolutely true about Cod, she is the last remaining Fleet boat in her WWII configuration.  In the early 90s a Japanese television network was doing a show about Pacific subs and asked to film aboard Cod because it was the only one left that was perfect in appearance.  The film crew was very polite and respectful, and the network donated some cash to her upkeep...but apparently the crew rather studiously ignored the Cod's scoreboard and all the Japanese flags marking sunken ships.
 
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