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(YouTube) Video Home inspection issues: the supercut   (youtube.com) divider line
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823 clicks; posted to Geek » on 22 May 2020 at 3:26 PM (13 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-05-22 3:04:00 PM  
Those were all amusing through outright horrifying.  Subby you have found a guilty pleasure of mine.

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2020-05-22 3:19:08 PM  
Used to be in the trade. I've seen some things, man, I've seen some things.
 
2020-05-22 3:37:35 PM  

BumpInTheNight: Those were all amusing through outright horrifying.  Subby you have found a guilty pleasure of mine.

[Fark user image image 356x475]


This is why Romex should be banned, idiots thinking that because they can install an outlet anywhere means they should.
 
2020-05-22 3:40:18 PM  
That breaker box!
 
2020-05-22 3:45:02 PM  

Mercutio879: That breaker box!


When I was house shopping a few years ago we came across a cute little place that had some major, uh, sort of well done renovations to bolt on a new room to the back of the house that was officially considered 'three seasons'.

The biggest show-stopper for us was seeing the second bathroom that was setup in the basement, shower, tub, all of that.  Same room:  The main breaker panel, sitting maybe a foot away from the plumbing for the shower/tub that was exposed and facing it, not to mention the humidity a shower already generates normally.  Homeowner's response to that was hand waving and then silence.

/the same room had a toilet beneath a window.  A window that was now on the wall leading to that new addition and it wasn't sealed up.  Looking through the window was the back of a couch up against it.
 
2020-05-22 3:49:24 PM  

BumpInTheNight: Those were all amusing through outright horrifying.  Subby you have found a guilty pleasure of mine.

[Fark user image 356x475]


nah man, thats fine!  if you have the water pipe right there you can use that as a ground!

most "accidental fires" should really be called what they are.  "self-arson"
 
2020-05-22 3:51:48 PM  

BumpInTheNight: Mercutio879: That breaker box!

When I was house shopping a few years ago we came across a cute little place that had some major, uh, sort of well done renovations to bolt on a new room to the back of the house that was officially considered 'three seasons'.

The biggest show-stopper for us was seeing the second bathroom that was setup in the basement, shower, tub, all of that.  Same room:  The main breaker panel, sitting maybe a foot away from the plumbing for the shower/tub that was exposed and facing it, not to mention the humidity a shower already generates normally.  Homeowner's response to that was hand waving and then silence.

/the same room had a toilet beneath a window.  A window that was now on the wall leading to that new addition and it wasn't sealed up.  Looking through the window was the back of a couch up against it.


Good lord.

We went house shopping about 10 years ago. I really wanted to be outside of the town, as I grew up on a farm, and having your neighbors 10 feet away was weird to me. We found an acreage for sale that was suspiciously cheap. When we went to check it out, the previous owners had put an addition on the house. The first part of the foundation for the addition was poured cement, the second part was clay brick, the third part was whatever rocks they could find with mortar in between.

And there wasn't a level floor in the place. The entire foundation for the original house was shot. That house probably brought down the price for the acreage.

/no butt windows, though.
 
2020-05-22 3:54:48 PM  

BumpInTheNight: Mercutio879: That breaker box!

When I was house shopping a few years ago we came across a cute little place that had some major, uh, sort of well done renovations to bolt on a new room to the back of the house that was officially considered 'three seasons'.

The biggest show-stopper for us was seeing the second bathroom that was setup in the basement, shower, tub, all of that.  Same room:  The main breaker panel, sitting maybe a foot away from the plumbing for the shower/tub that was exposed and facing it, not to mention the humidity a shower already generates normally.  Homeowner's response to that was hand waving and then silence.

/the same room had a toilet beneath a window.  A window that was now on the wall leading to that new addition and it wasn't sealed up.  Looking through the window was the back of a couch up against it.


i cant stop thinking about this now...
did the window still open?
like if you were a complete jackass could you slide the window open and wreck someones day when they're just sitting there on the couch watching TV innocently?
 
2020-05-22 3:56:19 PM  
I always use Structure Tech for all my home inspection needs. Ruben is brilliant. Best money spent is getting your own house inspected prior to putting it on the market and have the report out for all showings and open houses.
 
2020-05-22 4:00:11 PM  
Heh, that rickety stairway was great.  I totally would have destroyed that as a kid.
 
2020-05-22 4:03:31 PM  

BumpInTheNight: Mercutio879: That breaker box!

When I was house shopping a few years ago we came across a cute little place that had some major, uh, sort of well done renovations to bolt on a new room to the back of the house that was officially considered 'three seasons'.

The biggest show-stopper for us was seeing the second bathroom that was setup in the basement, shower, tub, all of that.  Same room:  The main breaker panel, sitting maybe a foot away from the plumbing for the shower/tub that was exposed and facing it, not to mention the humidity a shower already generates normally.  Homeowner's response to that was hand waving and then silence.

/the same room had a toilet beneath a window.  A window that was now on the wall leading to that new addition and it wasn't sealed up.  Looking through the window was the back of a couch up against it.


Secondary exit, in case of emergency, it's in the codes.

The window was tempered glass, right?
 
2020-05-22 4:03:51 PM  

oopsboom: i cant stop thinking about this now...
did the window still open?
like if you were a complete jackass could you slide the window open and wreck someones day when they're just sitting there on the couch watching TV innocently?


Yah, the single-pane basement style window setup was still fully functional.  Sliding three panel sort with the toilet a couple feet directly beneath it.  So average person head level is lined up with the window which is at the baseboard height of the additional room.  Shenanigans could be picture from either direction, if you catch my drift.  Not to mention the single pane's glass and how ineffective that is at muffling close range noises even when closed.
 
2020-05-22 4:05:38 PM  

Sin'sHero: The window was tempered glass, right?


There was light fabric curtain strung across and could be parted to open it, for some bloody reason.
 
2020-05-22 4:08:56 PM  
A friend of mines' wife was killed by a loose railing on their rent house.
She was out on the balcony and leaned on the railing.
It gave way and she fell about 30 feet on to some concrete steps.
Really tragic.
My friend had to sue the landlord and ended up with only a couple hundred thousand from his insurance.
Hardly a fair trade.
 
2020-05-22 4:38:51 PM  
oh the stuff i've seen home shopping

toured an A-frame once and i opened the crawlspace in the upstairs bedroom to look at the rafters.  I asked the realtor why he bothered bringing us to a house with a leaky roof. "There isn't anything on the form about a leaky roof, maybe they don't know" he said.  "Well someone put the duct tape across the insulation to hold it to the rafters when the paper got wet and the staples ripped out" says I. A week later the realtor calls me and says that house was just discounted 30k so the water damage must have been epic.

another house was crazy big for my budget.  At one point it had been divided up to make apartments so it was going to need some rehab but none of the dividing walls were load bearing and that job is definitely something i can handle but then i got to the basement.  A 220 breaker box surrounded by several small fuse boxes. Wires of at least 4 different vintages snaking in and out of everywhere.  Everything from current grade wire to that cardboard wrapped crap.  multiple fuses connected to a single breaker.  3 water heaters, 3 washers, 3 dryers with gas lines spliced into each other at multiple locations, same thing for the water and electrical supplies. I told the realtor hard pass and we're leaving.

Third house had knob and tube wiring in the attic but we were assured it was not connected.  I found an old push-style switch and pushed it on then held my current tester up and sure enough the electrons were a flowing.  As we were leaving Mrs. Scarf commented that while she was looking in the bathroom the vent fan and light just came on for some reason.

Basements with water marks 3ft off the floor or water actively leaking through, roofs with 3-5 layers of shingles, roof vents that were just nailed to the plywood w/o a vent hole, the list goes on and on.

If you are looking to buy a house go on a rainy day.  look at the roof, attic and basement before anything else. there isn't any need to fall in love with a great kitchen if the foundation if bowed, the roof leaks or you find a  flyer from a radon abatement service in the basement.
 
2020-05-22 5:15:17 PM  
Nice find, subby.  For those of you interested in this sort of thing I'd like to pass along a link to the ASHI Reporter.  Check out "Postcards form the Field" for more wacky hijinks of this sort. The past issues have kept me entertained during many a layover.

American Society of Home Inspectors ASHI Reporter
 
2020-05-22 6:12:24 PM  
Facing a hard choice on my house. The place has always had seepage when the rains are hard and continue for several days. Split-level; a semi-buried rec room, bath, and  bedroom with windows that are just at grade level, and an unfinished basement downstairs from that. Both of them get the seepage, the rec room gets it only when the rains have been epic and all the soil outside is completely saturated. The seepage comes out along the floor, not the walls, far as we can tell. Basement walls are directly visible and no seepage is present except at the wall/floor joint.

We did the easy things first over several years: re-hung the gutters, added bigger downspouts and long extensions to carry the water away from the foundation far into the yard. Deep-tilled and re-graded the shiatty clay soil landscaping to shed water away from the foundation. Slab-jacked the side walkway to angle drainage away fro the foundation. I went around the perimeter of the basement and troweled hydraulic cement into the floor/wall joint, helped for a while but the seepage still comes back.

Now we are trying to decide between adding sump pumps (weren't any in the original construcrtion), maybe one for the basement and one of those retrofit wall-gutter types for the rec room...  Or just an in-room sump system in the rec room, or doing an extensive French Drain system around the house or doing the French Drain plus digging out around the entire foundation and waterproofing from the outside.

Like I have money to do Any of this.  Not.

Wife wants us to sell for a loss and walk away from it, as the house is too big and expensive for us once I go on retirement pay anyway. As-is, It might pull 90K but with my luck, less. I was 3 years from paying off the mortgage and the plan before Covid was to sell the place and roll the profits into buying a down-sized place for retirement, now I gotta work another 4-5 years to build up what Covid  took out of my retirement savings.  It's all very depressing that I'm looking at between five and twenty grand worth of improvements on a 150K home just to get it to the state it should have been in when we moved in, and only to walk away from it, not getting any equity out of that.

Appreciate any advice. Besides hiring an arsonist.
 
2020-05-22 8:54:30 PM  
My favorite from house hunting in Chicago about ten years back was the toilet that had been installed at the top of the stairs to the basement. I walked in, felt the floor in front of the toilet give a little, and then realized it was half a door, installed sideways on the wall so it could be flipped up to allow access to the basement stairs.

Also, the house with an open flame from a gas jet on one of the basement walls, but that was more sad than scary, since that was likely the only heat source for the basement.
 
2020-05-23 7:26:31 AM  

Any Pie Left: Facing a hard choice on my house. The place has always had seepage when the rains are hard and continue for several days. Split-level; a semi-buried rec room, bath, and  bedroom with windows that are just at grade level, and an unfinished basement downstairs from that. Both of them get the seepage, the rec room gets it only when the rains have been epic and all the soil outside is completely saturated. The seepage comes out along the floor, not the walls, far as we can tell. Basement walls are directly visible and no seepage is present except at the wall/floor joint.

We did the easy things first over several years: re-hung the gutters, added bigger downspouts and long extensions to carry the water away from the foundation far into the yard. Deep-tilled and re-graded the shiatty clay soil landscaping to shed water away from the foundation. Slab-jacked the side walkway to angle drainage away fro the foundation. I went around the perimeter of the basement and troweled hydraulic cement into the floor/wall joint, helped for a while but the seepage still comes back.

Now we are trying to decide between adding sump pumps (weren't any in the original construcrtion), maybe one for the basement and one of those retrofit wall-gutter types for the rec room...  Or just an in-room sump system in the rec room, or doing an extensive French Drain system around the house or doing the French Drain plus digging out around the entire foundation and waterproofing from the outside.

Like I have money to do Any of this.  Not.

Wife wants us to sell for a loss and walk away from it, as the house is too big and expensive for us once I go on retirement pay anyway. As-is, It might pull 90K but with my luck, less. I was 3 years from paying off the mortgage and the plan before Covid was to sell the place and roll the profits into buying a down-sized place for retirement, now I gotta work another 4-5 years to build up what Covid  took out of my retirement savings.  It's all very depressing that ...


Not so much advice, more like a pair of stories:

Story #1: My folks have lived in the same house for almost 30 years now. Split level and the basement is below street/sewer level. This means that all the waste water from the laundry room and half bath ran to a tank/sump pump. The tank and pump are in the crawlspace and is operated by a simple float switch. About 7 years after we/they moved in and I'm off drinking my way through college I get a phone call that the pump broke and Dad (with a bad back) could use my help replacing it. In addition to the pain in the ass of replacing a 4 foot device inside a 2.5 foot crawlspace and the ~$450 or so for a new (quality) pump, the way that they found out the pump failed is when the tank overflowed and started flooding the laundry room/Mom's sewing room. Ruined a bunch of stuff in the room and a lot more stuff they had stored in the crawl space. Moral of the story is that if you install a pump/tank arrangement, keep in mind that the pump will fail at some point and the only way you will know is when other stuff gets ruined. That being said, since you are looking to cut and run, this may be the cheaper option. Having said that, since I've lived through this (literally) crappy experience, I walk away from any house that has an arrangement like that.

Story #2: A couple years ago the wife gets a big opportunity at work. It requires a medium distance move, but the company will pay for it and buy our house if it doesn't sell within 3 months. However, prior to the buyout they require an inspection and that everything be fixed (at our expense). All this relocation stuff is handled through a contractor, and they (along with just about everyone else) got hosed in the 2008 housing fun.  Even though this was 2017 (house bought built in 2008 and we bought it in 2014) they were still super paranoid about getting stuck with something they couldn't sell. They were concerned about a couple spots on the exterior stucco walls. As a result they had me pay someone to remove a couple sections of stucco, inspect it to see if it was wet inside (it wasn't) and repair it. They also were concerned with drainage around the foundation. Not because the crawlspace was wet, but with how wet the ground outside was and the slope of the ground around the foundation. Again, the buyout company required me to pay someone to come out, rip out all the vegetation around the house and put in a french drain arrangement. Those two big things and some other small stuff I don't remember came out to $10k-$12k. If I recall correctly the walls and the drains were roughly equivalent in cost, so call the drains about $5k-$6k for a 3000 sqft single level house.

So while a sump & pump arrangement may be cheaper in theory, after getting it all installed in a manner that provides access while not being intrusive into the living space it may end up only slightly less expensive than the drain option. And drains wouldn't be a surprise on an inspection report or a turn off to potential buyers.

That said, if you are going to cut and run, and not live there for another 10 years, I can't fault you for only wanting to do the minimum, especially since you've done the other easy stuff first.

Best of luck!

/Never try to sell your house in winter.
//Done it twice, they won't sell until spring anyway.
///Threes. Also, just don't.
 
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