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(Harvard University)   Harvard Medical School says COVID-19 infection grants immunity, and prototype vaccine is effective. Great news for all us Rhesus Macaques   (hms.harvard.edu) divider line
    More: Cool, Immune system, animal models, new studies, SARS-CoV-2, human cells, Antibody, SARS-CoV-2 infection, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center  
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631 clicks; posted to Geek » on 22 May 2020 at 11:22 AM (2 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



24 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-05-22 11:07:55 AM  
FTA:
Follow-up testing revealed dramatically lower viral loads in vaccinated animals, compared with the control group. Eight of the 25 vaccinated animals demonstrated no detectable virus at any point following exposure to the virus, while the other animals showed low levels of virus. Moreover, animals that had higher antibody levels had lower levels of the virus, a finding that suggests neutralizing antibodies may be a reliable marker of protection and may prove useful as a benchmark in clinical testing of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines.


it's not perfect, but we got that going for us, which is nice.
 
2020-05-22 11:12:11 AM  
What?  No pic?  Doesn't anyone want to see a picture of Macaque?
 
2020-05-22 11:29:35 AM  
After exposing nine adult macaques to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, the researchers monitored viral levels as the animals recovered. All nine animals recovered and developed antibodies against the virus. More than a month after initial infection, the team reexposed the rhesus macaques to the virus. Upon second exposure, the animals demonstrated near-complete protection against the virus.

This is either great news, or its the opening crawl to a Planet of the Apes reboot
 
2020-05-22 11:30:11 AM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: What?  No pic?  Doesn't anyone want to see a picture of Macaque?


I'm here for the rhesus pieces.
 
2020-05-22 11:30:39 AM  
Uh huh

And next week Liberty University will be all over the news that they discovered a vaccine that cures COVID-19 and homosexuality.
 
2020-05-22 11:33:16 AM  

gilgigamesh: After exposing nine adult macaques to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, the researchers monitored viral levels as the animals recovered. All nine animals recovered and developed antibodies against the virus. More than a month after initial infection, the team reexposed the rhesus macaques to the virus. Upon second exposure, the animals demonstrated near-complete protection against the virus.

This is either great news, or its the opening crawl to a Planet of the Apes reboot


It's good news, but not great news.

COVID-19 can cause long-term or permanent organ damage, so even recovered COVID-19 victims can have lasting injury - my fear is that, upon hearing that being infected likely confers immunity, the "COVID-19 parties" are going to kick off in earnest among stupid people.

This isn't chicken pox, where you're miserable for a bit, then get over it in a few weeks. Fully a third of folks who recovered from COVID-19 have received such "parting gifts," and folks eager to get back to a normal life are going to basically drive the numbers through the roof on the folks who end up permanently harmed.
 
2020-05-22 11:34:33 AM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: What?  No pic?  Doesn't anyone want to see a picture of Macaque?


Can it be on the front of a big "thank you" card?

As in "thanks for being a captive test animal helping to save the human race, willing or not"?

Happy as hell for news on the immunity/vaccine front - keenly aware of how it's being accomplished.

Your Macaque wants a banana and a couple of aspirin.
 
2020-05-22 11:35:27 AM  
Seriously, over a third of COVID-19 patients have suffered kiidney damage, for example. Can you imagine millions more folks willingly subjecting themselves to COVID-19 thinking that, if they get it now, all at once, up front, we can clear the social restrictions and get back to normal life?
 
2020-05-22 11:37:53 AM  
Pulled this off the internet yesterday regarding "promising prelimanry results"

Because all failed drugs and vaccines start off with promising trials. Only 13% of drugs get Phase 1 approval, only 66% of those 13% get to Phase 2 only 59% make it to Phase 3 and only 60% make it to approval.
https://www.nuventra.com/resources/blo​g/why-do-clinical-trials-fail/
That's 4% total with 40% failing out on the very last step.
Also relevant, production capacity. When a vaccine is found and approved, it needs to be produced. This is easier said than done. Since a vaccine is made up of living virus that's made inert, you can't just scale up production arbitrarily high. You can't covert existing industry and given the number of people who will want a vaccine, you can't rush new labs into being.
Even if every company capable of making the vaccine, in the whole world cooperates, getting to the low end threshold of for herd immunity will take 4.2 billion doses globally.
Now comes the logistics. Transportation is a Titanic task, but ultimately easy. Shipping stuff around isn't a problem until we get to the last mile. Administration of the vaccine. This is likely going to require drive through or carefully distanced lines of people with thousands of nurses giving out shoots.
Good news for anti vac people and bad news for everyone else, not only is the government not going to force everyone to get vaccinated, but they are going to have to have a system in place to see who's going to be able to get a vaccine and when. Essential workers followed by a lottery is the correct strategy, but it's all but guaranteed that some places are going to charge market prices for the vaccine, which initially, are going to be extreme
.

So yes, encouraging news is encouraging, but don't let it lull you into thinking everyone will be vaccinated within a year or so.
 
2020-05-22 11:39:14 AM  

FormlessOne: gilgigamesh: After exposing nine adult macaques to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, the researchers monitored viral levels as the animals recovered. All nine animals recovered and developed antibodies against the virus. More than a month after initial infection, the team reexposed the rhesus macaques to the virus. Upon second exposure, the animals demonstrated near-complete protection against the virus.

This is either great news, or its the opening crawl to a Planet of the Apes reboot

It's good news, but not great news.

COVID-19 can cause long-term or permanent organ damage, so even recovered COVID-19 victims can have lasting injury - my fear is that, upon hearing that being infected likely confers immunity, the "COVID-19 parties" are going to kick off in earnest among stupid people.

This isn't chicken pox, where you're miserable for a bit, then get over it in a few weeks. Fully a third of folks who recovered from COVID-19 have received such "parting gifts," and folks eager to get back to a normal life are going to basically drive the numbers through the roof on the folks who end up permanently harmed.


Actually? Chicken Pox/herpes can return later  - sometimes as something more problematic.

I like your posts - they are so full of worry I don't have to :)

You know who else had permanent organ damage as a result of pneumonia? The current Pope.
Man's had one lung for decades.  Didn't seem to slow him down much.
 
2020-05-22 11:40:44 AM  

FormlessOne: Seriously, over a third of COVID-19 patients have suffered kiidney damage, for example. Can you imagine millions more folks willingly subjecting themselves to COVID-19 thinking that, if they get it now, all at once, up front, we can clear the social restrictions and get back to normal life?


Buy stock in Dialysis companies and hope the morons are hurting, and killing, only themselves.
 
2020-05-22 11:46:03 AM  

FormlessOne: COVID-19 can cause long-term or permanent organ damage, so even recovered COVID-19 victims can have lasting injury - my fear is that, upon hearing that being infected likely confers immunity, the "COVID-19 parties" are going to kick off in earnest among stupid people.

This isn't chicken pox, where you're miserable for a bit, then get over it in a few weeks.


Shingles is a side-effect of chicken pox exposure.
 
2020-05-22 11:49:44 AM  

gilgigamesh: After exposing nine adult macaques to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, the researchers monitored viral levels as the animals recovered. All nine animals recovered and developed antibodies against the virus. More than a month after initial infection, the team reexposed the rhesus macaques to the virus. Upon second exposure, the animals demonstrated near-complete protection against the virus.

This is either great news, or its the opening crawl to a Planet of the Apes reboot


Within the next century this planet will be crawling with billions of intelligent, tool using, primates. They will comprise the dominant society of earth.

/still
 
2020-05-22 12:03:09 PM  

Earguy: Pulled this off the internet yesterday regarding "promising prelimanry results"

Because all failed drugs and vaccines start off with promising trials. Only 13% of drugs get Phase 1 approval, only 66% of those 13% get to Phase 2 only 59% make it to Phase 3 and only 60% make it to approval.
https://www.nuventra.com/resources/blo​g/why-do-clinical-trials-fail/
That's 4% total with 40% failing out on the very last step.
Also relevant, production capacity. When a vaccine is found and approved, it needs to be produced. This is easier said than done.
Since a vaccine is made up of living virus that's made inert, you can't just scale up production arbitrarily high. You can't covert existing industry and given the number of people who will want a vaccine, you can't rush new labs into being.
Even if every company capable of making the vaccine, in the whole world cooperates, getting to the low end threshold of for herd immunity will take 4.2 billion doses globally.
Now comes the logistics. Transportation is a Titanic task, but ultimately easy. Shipping stuff around isn't a problem until we get to the last mile. Administration of the vaccine. This is likely going to require drive through or carefully distanced lines of people with thousands of nurses giving out shoots.
Good news for anti vac people and bad news for everyone else, not only is the government not going to force everyone to get vaccinated, but they are going to have to have a system in place to see who's going to be able to get a vaccine and when. Essential workers followed by a lottery is the correct strategy, but it's all but guaranteed that some places are going to charge market prices for the vaccine, which initially, are going to be extreme.

So yes, encouraging news is encouraging, but don't let it lull you into thinking everyone will be vaccinated within a year or so.


It's worth noting that this vaccine was done without using live virus. It just uses a fragment of the virus that makes the spike protein and that's part of a modern strategy aimed specifically at a more manageable scale-up operation.

As for the result of actually conferring immunity, I think we've had enough of the experiment going on in the wild to say that those who recover do seem to have developed useful immunity. Otherwise, we'd have lots of examples of people who got sick a second time.

As for those who do show positive PCR tests after recovery, there was work done in South Korea to show that the PCR test was detecting virus fragments being shed from damaged lung tissue as patients healed. That makes sense. The PCR test will sense fragmented virus even though fragmented virus particles are not infectious.

And ultimately, immunity is never simply 100%. But we've got enough results just from observing millions who have been infected and recovered to say that the great majority of people develop some immunity post infection. What we don't know is the length of time that immunity will last because we've only had a few months of observation.
 
2020-05-22 12:04:09 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-22 12:21:03 PM  

This text is now purple: Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: What?  No pic?  Doesn't anyone want to see a picture of Macaque?

I'm here for the rhesus pieces.


What with the viral danger of wet markets and bushmeat, turns out there are in fact many wrong ways to eat a Rhesus.
 
2020-05-22 12:34:17 PM  

FormlessOne: Seriously, over a third of COVID-19 patients have suffered kiidney damage, for example. Can you imagine millions more folks willingly subjecting themselves to COVID-19 thinking that, if they get it now, all at once, up front, we can clear the social restrictions and get back to normal life?


I'll just point out that the patients in the study were sick enough to need hospitalization. Since we don't know how many actually have had the virus and didn't know it or those who recovered at home.

I know it makes scary headlines but to imply that you have a 33% chance of lasting kidney problems if you contract Corona virus is not accurate.
 
2020-05-22 12:34:22 PM  

FormlessOne: gilgigamesh: After exposing nine adult macaques to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, the researchers monitored viral levels as the animals recovered. All nine animals recovered and developed antibodies against the virus. More than a month after initial infection, the team reexposed the rhesus macaques to the virus. Upon second exposure, the animals demonstrated near-complete protection against the virus.

This is either great news, or its the opening crawl to a Planet of the Apes reboot

It's good news, but not great news.

COVID-19 can cause long-term or permanent organ damage, so even recovered COVID-19 victims can have lasting injury - my fear is that, upon hearing that being infected likely confers immunity, the "COVID-19 parties" are going to kick off in earnest among stupid people.

This isn't chicken pox, where you're miserable for a bit, then get over it in a few weeks. Fully a third of folks who recovered from COVID-19 have received such "parting gifts," and folks eager to get back to a normal life are going to basically drive the numbers through the roof on the folks who end up permanently harmed.


What % of people could be legally disabled after recovery is something I have been thinking about.
 
2020-05-22 12:35:58 PM  

This text is now purple: FormlessOne: COVID-19 can cause long-term or permanent organ damage, so even recovered COVID-19 victims can have lasting injury - my fear is that, upon hearing that being infected likely confers immunity, the "COVID-19 parties" are going to kick off in earnest among stupid people.

This isn't chicken pox, where you're miserable for a bit, then get over it in a few weeks.

Shingles is a side-effect of chicken pox exposure.


Shingles is no fun.
 
2020-05-22 12:42:04 PM  
How about in us aliens without a rhesus factor?
 
2020-05-22 1:11:40 PM  
DID THEY USE ZINC?  YOU NEED TO USE ZINC!
 
2020-05-22 1:31:50 PM  
My wife, Morgan Fairchild, loves macacque
 
2020-05-22 2:18:23 PM  

SafetyThird: FormlessOne: Seriously, over a third of COVID-19 patients have suffered kiidney damage, for example. Can you imagine millions more folks willingly subjecting themselves to COVID-19 thinking that, if they get it now, all at once, up front, we can clear the social restrictions and get back to normal life?

I'll just point out that the patients in the study were sick enough to need hospitalization. Since we don't know how many actually have had the virus and didn't know it or those who recovered at home.

I know it makes scary headlines but to imply that you have a 33% chance of lasting kidney problems if you contract Corona virus is not accurate.


It's almost akin to saying 100% of people that catch COVID are hospitalized.
 
2020-05-22 4:01:34 PM  

FormlessOne: COVID-19 can cause long-term or permanent organ damage, so even recovered COVID-19 victims can have lasting injury - my fear is that, upon hearing that being infected likely confers immunity, the "COVID-19 parties" are going to kick off in earnest among stupid people.


Agreed. I am livid that the media talks about deaths and not disabilities.
 
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