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(Detroit Free Press)   First it was Flu Klux Klan rallies at the Capitol, then the dams breaking in Midland, now a live Civil War cannonball found at a recycling center in West Michigan. Subby is going to hole up in Detroit for his own safety   (freep.com) divider line
    More: Scary, Police, Grand Rapids, Michigan, United States, Kent County, Michigan, Grand Rapids police officers, Kent County, Recycling, War  
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1787 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 May 2020 at 4:21 PM (13 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-05-23 9:57:35 AM  

DanInKansas: I'm extremely skeptical that after 155 years the powder would still be able to detonate.


Old powder and explosive concoctions are indeed usually inert after anything approaching that time period.  Usually.  But there are some oddball reactions that can occur leaving you with some really nasty shiat.  Even discounting any explosions, what's left in there can be toxic as hell.  They're best left alone or alerted to your local ordinance-safing types, just because they won't go boom doesn't mean they're harmless at all.
 
2020-05-23 12:37:25 PM  

Mock26: Uh, that is not a cannonball. It is a shell, maybe for a mortar, but cannonballs do not explode. They are solid shot.

And on an historically interested note, there are places in the U.S. and Europe where you can still see cannonballs embedded in walls. I know there is a cannonball still embedded in the wall of a tavern or inn down in Vicksburg (I think. It has been a while since I read about it) and a British one longed in a building up in Connecticut somewhere. One of my favorites is from Castle Nuovo in Spain. It has a cannonball lodged in a bronze door. And while I do not think it is there any more, the Mythbuster team managed to lodge a cannonball into someone's home out in California. The one in the below image is in Weymouth, from the English Civil War.

[i.imgur.com image 850x566]


I wanna say the Mythbusters one didn't get embedded in- screw it, let's check Wikipedia:

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-23 2:21:29 PM  

Fireproof: Mock26: Uh, that is not a cannonball. It is a shell, maybe for a mortar, but cannonballs do not explode. They are solid shot.

And on an historically interested note, there are places in the U.S. and Europe where you can still see cannonballs embedded in walls. I know there is a cannonball still embedded in the wall of a tavern or inn down in Vicksburg (I think. It has been a while since I read about it) and a British one longed in a building up in Connecticut somewhere. One of my favorites is from Castle Nuovo in Spain. It has a cannonball lodged in a bronze door. And while I do not think it is there any more, the Mythbuster team managed to lodge a cannonball into someone's home out in California. The one in the below image is in Weymouth, from the English Civil War.

[i.imgur.com image 850x566]

I wanna say the Mythbusters one didn't get embedded in- screw it, let's check Wikipedia:

[Fark user image 422x750]


Close enough. I did not think it had  embedded in anything, but I could not pass up the chance to reference the incident, which is still one of my favorite segments from Mythbusters.
 
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