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(Detroit Free Press)   First it was Flu Klux Klan rallies at the Capitol, then the dams breaking in Midland, now a live Civil War cannonball found at a recycling center in West Michigan. Subby is going to hole up in Detroit for his own safety   (freep.com) divider line
    More: Scary, Police, Grand Rapids, Michigan, United States, Kent County, Michigan, Grand Rapids police officers, Kent County, Recycling, War  
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1820 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 May 2020 at 4:21 PM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-05-22 3:13:58 PM  
hole up in Detroit for his own safety

e.lvme.meView Full Size
 
2020-05-22 3:40:48 PM  
How do they make them?
 
2020-05-22 4:24:22 PM  
I had absolutely no idea that anyone ever made explosive cannon balls.
 
2020-05-22 4:27:05 PM  
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2020-05-22 4:28:59 PM  

Skeleton Man: I had absolutely no idea that anyone ever made explosive cannon balls.


They're the ones with fuses sticking out, duh.

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2020-05-22 4:29:31 PM  
A live cannonball? As opposed to a dead one?
 
2020-05-22 4:29:37 PM  

Skeleton Man: I had absolutely no idea that anyone ever made explosive cannon balls.


I think your mind would be completely blown if you ever picked up a history book on Civil War artillery.
 
2020-05-22 4:29:45 PM  
66.media.tumblr.comView Full Size
 
2020-05-22 4:30:31 PM  
How's the statue coming along?
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2020-05-22 4:31:36 PM  
I'm extremely skeptical that after 155 years the powder would still be able to detonate.
 
2020-05-22 4:34:42 PM  

rebelyell2006: Skeleton Man: I had absolutely no idea that anyone ever made explosive cannon balls.

I think your mind would be completely blown if you ever picked up a history book on Civil War artillery.


A "cannonball" is solid shot without an explosive charge.

This item would be called "spherical case," a type of shell.
 
2020-05-22 4:36:07 PM  
If you have to "hole up" in Detroit you have greater problems than a civil war cannonball.
 
2020-05-22 4:36:42 PM  
Canada, and some great strip clubs, are right across the river
 
2020-05-22 4:38:41 PM  

DanInKansas: I'm extremely skeptical that after 155 years the powder would still be able to detonate.


You might be surprised. It depends on a lot of factors. You REALLY don't want a 6 pound cannonball going off in your face.

/ 6's and 12's tended to be field artillery, whilst 20's and higher tended to be installed permanently.
 
2020-05-22 4:39:46 PM  
Nice to hear Kim Deal hasn't succumbed to her nasty old habits...

The Breeders - Cannonball
Youtube fxvkI9MTQw4
 
2020-05-22 4:40:05 PM  
It's probably an Amway product,
 
2020-05-22 4:41:04 PM  

emersonbiggins: Skeleton Man: I had absolutely no idea that anyone ever made explosive cannon balls.

They're the ones with fuses sticking out, duh.

[encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com image 237x213]


But without "bomb" written on the side, because if it did it would be a bomb.
 
2020-05-22 4:42:05 PM  
The thing has had 160 years to detonate. Probably ain't gonna happen now.
 
2020-05-22 4:42:51 PM  
Subby can crash at my place, but not through the front door, please'
 
2020-05-22 4:44:01 PM  

iamskibibitz: The thing has had 160 years to detonate. Probably ain't gonna happen now.


Ok, YOU go out and start juggling with a few. You (or your next of kin) let me know how it goes.
 
2020-05-22 4:48:02 PM  

BigNumber12: rebelyell2006: Skeleton Man: I had absolutely no idea that anyone ever made explosive cannon balls.

I think your mind would be completely blown if you ever picked up a history book on Civil War artillery.

A "cannonball" is solid shot without an explosive charge.

This item would be called "spherical case," a type of shell.


Precisely, but people not knowing any better about older smoothbore artillery would not tell the difference between solid shot and case shot.
 
2020-05-22 4:54:53 PM  

rebelyell2006: Skeleton Man: I had absolutely no idea that anyone ever made explosive cannon balls.

I think your mind would be completely blown if you ever picked up a history book on Civil War artillery.


They had explosive cannonballs even further back. It wasn't a new thing in the Civil War, though they'd discovered TNT by then, so it used more boomboom than your average black powder charge.

Also, given the age, I'd be curious to see whether the explosive charge in the ball was still viable or if it had decomposed into an inert state.
 
2020-05-22 4:55:15 PM  

rebelyell2006: BigNumber12: rebelyell2006: Skeleton Man: I had absolutely no idea that anyone ever made explosive cannon balls.

I think your mind would be completely blown if you ever picked up a history book on Civil War artillery.

A "cannonball" is solid shot without an explosive charge.

This item would be called "spherical case," a type of shell.

Precisely, but people not knowing any better about older smoothbore artillery would not tell the difference between solid shot and case shot.


Where's Ditty when we need him?
 
2020-05-22 5:00:38 PM  
Because solid shot, case shot, and shell were all round and attached to a wooden sabot and powder bag for 6 and 12 pound smoothbore field pieces (gun, howitzer, gun-howitzer, mountain howitzer, etc etc).  The ammunition was typically color-coded, but otherwise they were large iron balls.
 
2020-05-22 5:04:49 PM  

DanInKansas: I'm extremely skeptical that after 155 years the powder would still be able to detonate.


155 years burried in the ground is a different story than 155 years in a basement. Regular ammo is good for 60+ years before the primers start failing.
 
2020-05-22 5:06:10 PM  

DanInKansas: I'm extremely skeptical that after 155 years the powder would still be able to detonate.


Considering how may WWI and II bombs are still considered dangerous today, I wouldn't risk it.
 
2020-05-22 5:06:44 PM  
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2020-05-22 5:06:55 PM  
But wow, and here I thought people trying to recycle used diapers were dipshiats...
 
2020-05-22 5:09:21 PM  

Fireproof: DanInKansas: I'm extremely skeptical that after 155 years the powder would still be able to detonate.

Considering how may WWI and II bombs are still considered dangerous today, I wouldn't risk it.


World War I they used variations of TNT, which was a very stable explosive.  Black powder from the Civil War in a poorly-sealed cast iron casing would not survive as well.  Just getting it wet would take care of it.
 
2020-05-22 5:11:17 PM  

rebelyell2006: BigNumber12: rebelyell2006: Skeleton Man: I had absolutely no idea that anyone ever made explosive cannon balls.

I think your mind would be completely blown if you ever picked up a history book on Civil War artillery.

A "cannonball" is solid shot without an explosive charge.

This item would be called "spherical case," a type of shell.

Precisely, but people not knowing any better about older smoothbore artillery would not tell the difference between solid shot and case shot.


Absolutely, despite my hope that folks would notice the flattened circle on one side and suspect that it wasn't simply solid shot.

Pedants gonna pedant.
 
2020-05-22 5:11:22 PM  
thesouloftheplot.files.wordpress.comView Full Size
 
2020-05-22 5:18:13 PM  

Skeleton Man: I had absolutely no idea that anyone ever made explosive cannon balls.


Yeah, did they mean canister shot?
 
2020-05-22 5:23:33 PM  
Uh, that is not a cannonball. It is a shell, maybe for a mortar, but cannonballs do not explode. They are solid shot.

And on an historically interested note, there are places in the U.S. and Europe where you can still see cannonballs embedded in walls. I know there is a cannonball still embedded in the wall of a tavern or inn down in Vicksburg (I think. It has been a while since I read about it) and a British one longed in a building up in Connecticut somewhere. One of my favorites is from Castle Nuovo in Spain. It has a cannonball lodged in a bronze door. And while I do not think it is there any more, the Mythbuster team managed to lodge a cannonball into someone's home out in California. The one in the below image is in Weymouth, from the English Civil War.

i.imgur.comView Full Size
 
2020-05-22 5:31:51 PM  

BigNumber12: rebelyell2006: Skeleton Man: I had absolutely no idea that anyone ever made explosive cannon balls.

I think your mind would be completely blown if you ever picked up a history book on Civil War artillery.

A "cannonball" is solid shot without an explosive charge.

This item would be called "spherical case," a type of shell.


Do they store them in a clip?
 
2020-05-22 5:35:19 PM  

BigNumber12: rebelyell2006: BigNumber12: rebelyell2006: Skeleton Man: I had absolutely no idea that anyone ever made explosive cannon balls.

I think your mind would be completely blown if you ever picked up a history book on Civil War artillery.

A "cannonball" is solid shot without an explosive charge.

This item would be called "spherical case," a type of shell.

Precisely, but people not knowing any better about older smoothbore artillery would not tell the difference between solid shot and case shot.

Absolutely, despite my hope that folks would notice the flattened circle on one side and suspect that it wasn't simply solid shot.

Pedants gonna pedant.


With enough rust or accumulation, that spot would be difficult to notice.
 
2020-05-22 5:39:56 PM  

eswan: BigNumber12: rebelyell2006: Skeleton Man: I had absolutely no idea that anyone ever made explosive cannon balls.

I think your mind would be completely blown if you ever picked up a history book on Civil War artillery.

A "cannonball" is solid shot without an explosive charge.

This item would be called "spherical case," a type of shell.

Do they store them in a clip?


It's called a magazine, you monster!

Also, 'smarted' because I assume that was intentional.
 
2020-05-22 5:56:05 PM  
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2020-05-22 6:13:03 PM  
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2020-05-22 6:17:22 PM  
Subby holed up in Detroit:

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2020-05-22 6:20:28 PM  

Skeleton Man: I had absolutely no idea that anyone ever made explosive cannon balls.


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2020-05-22 6:57:41 PM  
Those things can go off if you mess with them. I imagine sealing the the hole for the detonator was important to keep it from going off in the barrel. Therefore no water gets in to wreck the powder.

From 2015
 
2020-05-22 7:52:57 PM  
I'm curious how many generations used it for shot-put
 
2020-05-22 8:08:18 PM  

cwheelie: Canada, and some great strip clubs, are right across the river


Canada's closed. Beaver out front should have told you.
 
2020-05-22 8:16:14 PM  
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Chain shot. And if you survive, you can put them on your truck.
 
2020-05-22 8:22:57 PM  
....Or you could go to Fort Pulaski, GA, the first fortress to be taken down by rifled artillery"

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That picture doesn't do reality justice:  there are at least a couple dozen cannonballs and shells buried in that wall.
 
2020-05-22 11:20:36 PM  
And then there's the 17-year cicadas coming back this summer....
And the hurricanes, which are totally not caused by climate change, nope, not our fault.

(To those pedants saying they're not cannonballs, if they're big and spherical and get shot out of cannon-like-things, they're cannonballs to the ordinary human, whether or not they've got a charge and a fuse.)
 
2020-05-23 2:32:42 AM  
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2020-05-23 3:50:11 AM  

billstewart: And then there's the 17-year cicadas coming back this summer....



Yeah, but it is only Brood IX. They are a relatively small brood.
 
2020-05-23 3:51:58 AM  

billstewart: (To those pedants saying they're not cannonballs, if they're big and spherical and get shot out of cannon-like-things, they're cannonballs to the ordinary human, whether or not they've got a charge and a fuse.)


And we are just trying to enlighten those ordinary humans who are ignorant of the difference between a cannonball and a shell. Does not mean we are being pedants. It means we are being educators.

i.ytimg.comView Full Size
 
2020-05-23 6:53:47 AM  
Cannonballs are solid
Shells are hollow and filled with powder and shrapnel.
Canister shot was cylindrical and filled with "grapeshot" like a huge shotgun shell
Minie balls were huge bullets designed to rip body parts off

Now you're edumacated.
 
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