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(Airlive)   If you find parts of a Boeing 737 in your backyard, Swift Air would like to have them back. Maybe   (airlive.net) divider line
    More: Scary, Southwest Airlines, Swift Air, Airport, missing part of its vertical stabilizer, Boeing 737, Psychometrics, Republic Airlines, Information  
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2288 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 May 2020 at 4:29 AM (8 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



25 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-05-22 4:42:22 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-22 4:42:26 AM  
Boeing: The front of the tail fell off.  It's not that 737s aren't safe, it's just that this one perhaps wasn't as safe as some of the other ones where the front of the tail doesn't fall off at all.
Interviewer:  Why did the front of the tail fall off?
Boeing: A cloud hit it.
Interviewer: Is that unusual?
Boeing: In the air?  Chance in a million.

/ rigorous aviation engineering standards
// no cardboard, no tape, a minimum crew requirement
/// uhhh... three I suppose
 
2020-05-22 4:43:13 AM  
Isn't Victorville a big Pick-a-Plane-Part and long term aircraft parking where you expect missing some minor trim or emblems, and maybe a new door ding after a sweet vacation away from San Diego?


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-22 4:45:00 AM  
A Swift Air Boeing 737-800 was spotted landing with missing part of its vertical stabilizer missing

fortunately the parts that were there were there
 
2020-05-22 5:24:31 AM  
Shameless Best Scene
Youtube 81NMxdyN5DA
 
2020-05-22 6:16:17 AM  
Mentour Pilot (a very informative 737 pilot) has lots of details on why the dorsal fin (that's what it's called) exists in the first place.

Aircraft landing with missing tail section!!
Youtube dVm5navUhfA
 
2020-05-22 6:41:28 AM  
Nice headline. Did the plane accidentally with missing it?

/When you settle for an English degree, and still fall short.../
 
2020-05-22 6:46:13 AM  
vignette.wikia.nocookie.netView Full Size
 
2020-05-22 7:42:52 AM  

CluelessMoron: Mentour Pilot (a very informative 737 pilot) has lots of details on why the dorsal fin (that's what it's called) exists in the first place.


It is actually called a vertical stabilizer.

Dorsal fins are found on whales and sharks.
 
2020-05-22 7:52:08 AM  

Yaw String: CluelessMoron: Mentour Pilot (a very informative 737 pilot) has lots of details on why the dorsal fin (that's what it's called) exists in the first place.

It is actually called a vertical stabilizer.

Dorsal fins are found on whales and sharks.


No. Watch the  video. That particular part that fell off is called dorsal, and was added on when they put on larger engines.

He explains why, and also why it wasn't disasterous that it fell off.  It would only have been bad if they had also had an engine failure (well, or if it had damaged the elevators on its way out).
 
2020-05-22 8:03:15 AM  
Screw you. A few more accidents, and I'll have enough pieces to build my own plane.
 
2020-05-22 8:31:41 AM  
I'll refer you to the landmark Supreme Court case  Finders v. Keepers.
 
2020-05-22 8:36:00 AM  
The whole farking tail section's got damage. How in the bloody motherfarking hell did the crew NOT notice this?

That had to have been some pretty severe turbulence to cause that.
 
2020-05-22 8:42:04 AM  

CluelessMoron: Yaw String: CluelessMoron: Mentour Pilot (a very informative 737 pilot) has lots of details on why the dorsal fin (that's what it's called) exists in the first place.

It is actually called a vertical stabilizer.

Dorsal fins are found on whales and sharks.

No. Watch the  video. That particular part that fell off is called dorsal, and was added on when they put on larger engines.

He explains why, and also why it wasn't disasterous that it fell off.  It would only have been bad if they had also had an engine failure (well, or if it had damaged the elevators on its way out).


It didn't damage the elevators, but it definitely did some damage to the fore of the horizontal stabilizers. I wouldn't be terribly surprised if it damaged components inside.

Oof. Boeing needs to get its shiat together. I've said it before and I'll say it again, they have too many spoons in the pot. I know this from helping a client onboard a Boeing project.

If they need that many spoons, they need to make sure half those spoons are QC.
 
2020-05-22 9:07:49 AM  
Not so CSB

Back around 2004 I was working for a company that installed wireless network antennas used to get internet access to areas where traditional service was either non existent or very slow.  I was on the roof of a building right on the take off/landing path of a runway for O'Hare airport, not paying attention to the planes as I had to get the antenna bracket mounted before my boss got there with the antenna.  As im working, I hear the loud roar of a big plane going overhead, followed by what sounded like rocks hitting the roof behind me, and a loud thump about 10 feet in front of me.  Look up to see one of those wing winglets on the roof (don't know what its actually called), that I know wasn't there before.  Looked something like this part that I badly circled:
Fark user imageView Full Size


Looked behind me and saw a long shiny bolt that also wasn't there earlier.  Grabbed both and brought them down into the building and up to the owner of the business that had hired my company.  Showed him what had hit the roof and he just laughed and said "Again?  Oh well." then turned to his secretary and asked her to call the FAA to report yet another plane part that hit the building.  Apparently this happened often enough that she had the phone number on speed dial, and the person on the other end knew who she was by voice.
 
2020-05-22 9:19:36 AM  
That's a crap load of damage. I'm having a hard time understanding how anything fell off the vertical structures and managed to do all that damage on the leading edge of the horizontal stabilizer. Pieces generally can't fly off to the side when traveling at high speed (save explodo engines).
 
2020-05-22 9:24:05 AM  

tuxq: Oof. Boeing needs to get its shiat together.


It's a 22 year old aircraft that is coming out of long term storage.  I'm going to bet that the problem is less with Boeing and more with improper inspections and maintenance by the end user.
 
2020-05-22 9:33:09 AM  

Warmachine999: Not so CSB

Back around 2004 I was working for a company that installed wireless network antennas used to get internet access to areas where traditional service was either non existent or very slow.  I was on the roof of a building right on the take off/landing path of a runway for O'Hare airport, not paying attention to the planes as I had to get the antenna bracket mounted before my boss got there with the antenna.  As im working, I hear the loud roar of a big plane going overhead, followed by what sounded like rocks hitting the roof behind me, and a loud thump about 10 feet in front of me.  Look up to see one of those wing winglets on the roof (don't know what its actually called), that I know wasn't there before.  Looked something like this part that I badly circled:
[Fark user image image 600x809]

Looked behind me and saw a long shiny bolt that also wasn't there earlier.  Grabbed both and brought them down into the building and up to the owner of the business that had hired my company.  Showed him what had hit the roof and he just laughed and said "Again?  Oh well." then turned to his secretary and asked her to call the FAA to report yet another plane part that hit the building.  Apparently this happened often enough that she had the phone number on speed dial, and the person on the other end knew who she was by voice.


You almost got nailed by a flap canoe? Those suckers are heavy!
 
2020-05-22 1:39:31 PM  

Click Click D'oh: tuxq: Oof. Boeing needs to get its shiat together.

It's a 22 year old aircraft that is coming out of long term storage.  I'm going to bet that the problem is less with Boeing and more with improper inspections and maintenance by the end user.


My guess, having opened up those panels myself countless times, is that these were removed for inspection of the VSTAB attach hardware, and then not fully installed (the dorsal is installed through the ceiling in the aft cabin).  Any short flight would have knocked them off.

You are correct, this has NOTHING to do with Boeing and everything to do with the maintenance crew who did the inspection and re-installation.
 
2020-05-22 7:38:44 PM  
The crew was unaware of the incident.

So, Swift pilots aren't any better than Swift drivers.
 
2020-05-22 7:43:22 PM  
 The damage I would worry about is the damage to the leading edge of the distal end of the port stabilizer. That shredded the aircraft skin.
Its clearly FOD, but clearly not incurred from the dorsal breaking loose - the damage is just too far outboard.
They are likely related, but more from both being damaged by whatever hit the plane, rather than the one issue having caused the other.
-
The real question is how the hell the flight crew was not aware of a bird strike or other debris strike of that magnitude. That had to have noticeably affected the flight characteristics. You don't just trim out that kind of sudden change and go back to ignoring it.
 
2020-05-22 7:46:50 PM  

Lovesandwich: Click Click D'oh: tuxq: Oof. Boeing needs to get its shiat together.

It's a 22 year old aircraft that is coming out of long term storage.  I'm going to bet that the problem is less with Boeing and more with improper inspections and maintenance by the end user.

My guess, having opened up those panels myself countless times, is that these were removed for inspection of the VSTAB attach hardware, and then not fully installed (the dorsal is installed through the ceiling in the aft cabin).  Any short flight would have knocked them off.

You are correct, this has NOTHING to do with Boeing and everything to do with the maintenance crew who did the inspection and re-installation.


I fly, but know nothing of the ground maintenance side of things. Do you have any guesses as to the cause of the port hstab damage? It looks pretty far out to be FOD from the dorsal.
 
2020-05-22 9:19:19 PM  

lycanth: The crew was unaware of the incident.

So, Swift pilots aren't any better than Swift drivers.


SWIFT: See What I Farked-up Today
 
2020-05-22 9:46:04 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


Nuff said on that note on how to fix anything!!!!!
 
2020-05-22 10:34:55 PM  

Dryad: Lovesandwich: Click Click D'oh: tuxq: Oof. Boeing needs to get its shiat together.

It's a 22 year old aircraft that is coming out of long term storage.  I'm going to bet that the problem is less with Boeing and more with improper inspections and maintenance by the end user.

My guess, having opened up those panels myself countless times, is that these were removed for inspection of the VSTAB attach hardware, and then not fully installed (the dorsal is installed through the ceiling in the aft cabin).  Any short flight would have knocked them off.

You are correct, this has NOTHING to do with Boeing and everything to do with the maintenance crew who did the inspection and re-installation.

I fly, but know nothing of the ground maintenance side of things. Do you have any guesses as to the cause of the port hstab damage? It looks pretty far out to be FOD from the dorsal.


So, the dorsal fin left the airplane, that is obvious.  The 'damage' on the side of the Vertical Stabilizer (V-Stab), the 'tail' as many like to call it (the Horizontal Stabilizer (H-Stab) is the little wings in the back) is actually an access panel (or two panels, it has been a while since I did work up there on a 737) which is opened to inspect the mounting fittings that attach the V-stab to the fuselage.  There are two mounts in the front, and four about midway back, about there the big hole meets the little hole.

A maintainer would open them up, and there are a LOT of screws holding them on, do visual or non-destructive inspection to ensure that there aren't any cracks, or corrosion, then close the panels with all of those screws.

My best guess, and it is only a guess, is that the panel was only installed with a few screws in a temporary kind of way, and the inspector didn't go up and look at the closed panel to ensure that it was secure.  Once airborne, the panel would get airflow under it and depart the aircraft.

As for the dorsal, it is quite large, but doesn't weigh very much. However, when travelling at speed it would do some damage when it hits the leading edge of the H-stab, which is a curved piece of aluminum with aluminum ribs inside. The skins on the stabs aren't that thick, maybe .063" thick, and a piece of fast moving metal would do some damage to it.

Being that the people inside the aircraft didn't notice anything, I would say that the dorsal probably wasn't secured properly, the hardware that holds it in place is installed up through fuselage with a lot of bolts, then the bolt heads are sealed with a kind of sealant.  If the bolts were too short, which could be the problem, then they would hold for a short while, but as the air loads increased, the dorsal would go away.  The reason that the crew wouldn't hear air rushing out of the holes is that they were still plugged with the bolts and sealant.

I have seen a LOT of people claiming metal fatigue, and blaming Boeing for this, but having fixed 737's for a very long time (around 20 years) I would say that most likely maintenance made a mistake.

There was also a suggestion of a bird strike, but I have seen lots of bird strikes and never would it take the dorsal off, the airflow alone wouldn't allow the bird to hit it in a way to remove it.  Damage it, yes, but not remove it.

We do try our best to not be human while fixing planes, but in the end, we are human.

I hope this helps understand a bit.
 
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