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(Guardian)   Wrenched are the cheesemakers   (theguardian.com) divider line
    More: Sad, Cheese, Fungus, Protected Geographical Status, Stilton cheese, Stilton, matter of fact, Milk, blue stilton's distinct smell  
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660 clicks; posted to Business » on 21 May 2020 at 10:44 AM (4 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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4 days ago  
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4 days ago  
Did you perhaps mean "wretched" Subby?

Anyway, love Stilton but can't eat it.  Bad enzymes for mood.
 
4 days ago  
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/love blue cheese
 
4 days ago  
Some one go on Fox & Friends and tell them that a slice of Stilton a day is better than taking hydroxychloroquine.
 
4 days ago  
I prefer Cheshire (the cheese - not the cat)
 
4 days ago  
Stores soon to be completely uncontaminated by Stilton cheese.
 
4 days ago  

Diogenes: Did you perhaps mean "wretched" Subby?

Anyway, love Stilton but can't eat it.  Bad enzymes for mood.


*shakes tiny first at spell checker*

/Makes not to checked the checker.
//Again
 
4 days ago  
I love Stilton. I'll do my bit and buy an extra pack next time I shop.
 
4 days ago  
As a French person proud of his nation's 400 kind of cheese, I have to say this...


The British make some very good cheese. A place close to my flat sells some Shropshire, and served at the right temperature, this stuff is a sin.

Also, we used Stilton to make a great appetizer. Mix Stilton with mascarpone (half and half), and put smalls balls of the mixture on black chocolate granolas. Then put some dashes of Port reduction on top of it. This is delicious.
 
4 days ago  
Cheese sales in France are down as much as 60%.

R.I.P. Paris Stilton

upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size
 
4 days ago  

padraig: As a French person proud of his nation's 400 kind of cheese, I have to say this...


The British make some very good cheese.


I've never found a Brie quite as nice. There are a couple of British ones, but I prefer the French.
 
4 days ago  

Carter Pewterschmidt: padraig: As a French person proud of his nation's 400 kind of cheese, I have to say this...


The British make some very good cheese.

I've never found a Brie quite as nice. There are a couple of British ones, but I prefer the French.


I don't try to look at British equivalent to French cheeses. I like those that are not found elsewhere. I especially like their blue cheeses, but I also tasted some great cheddars that are far far better than what you usually find at the supermarket. I also remember once eating a sheep cheese whose name I can't remember, that was delicious.
 
3 days ago  

padraig: As a French person proud of his nation's 400 kind of cheese, I have to say this...


The British make some very good cheese. A place close to my flat sells some Shropshire, and served at the right temperature, this stuff is a sin.


Cheese is the one thing that befuddles me about British food.  They have some amazing, flavorful cheeses and the rest of their native food is just awful on the whole.  Family background is Manx and English so I'm not just piling on the stereotype.

My father grew up in what was at the time a predominantly Italian neighborhood.  Grandmom could bake with the best, did wedding cakes and so forth, but non desserts were a problem.  Dad liked eating over at friends' houses.
 
3 days ago  

Super Chronic: Cheese sales in France are down as much as 60%.

R.I.P. Paris Stilton

[upload.wikimedia.org image 255x353]


No, it's Stefani

vignette.wikia.nocookie.netView Full Size
 
3 days ago  

Myk-House of El: Cheese is the one thing that befuddles me about British food.  They have some amazing, flavorful cheeses and the rest of their native food is just awful on the whole.  Family background is Manx and English so I'm not just piling on the stereotype.


Some people have said it is to do with history, both ancient and recent. For centuries England was an easy place to grow wheat, carrots, turnips and farm pigs, sheep and cattle. So for food you'd chop that stuff up and throw it in a pot. Easy. Countries like Sweden have weird pickled fish because that had to, or they'd starve in winter. India has spices to preserve meat and to hit the smell of it going bad. Germany has sausage because again they needed to preserve meat and so on. The UK climate and landscape meant they just didn't need to do any of that stuff.
More recently we had WWII where food was scarce for years, and many foods vanished entirely. If you're going to risk sailing a ship through U Boat fleets then fill it with ammunition and machine parts, not kiwi fruit and avocados. And rationing lasted years after the war, well into the fifties, so we had an entire generation raised on a very limited and boring diet.
But it has changed hugely in the last few decades. I can (just about) remember in the seventies the typical evening meal might be fish fingers, peas and mashed potato. Today it might be chicken tikka masala or sausage with cheese and herb stuffing. My local Asda has two bays full of just different varieties of virgin olive oil. There are whole sections for Chinese, Indian, Mexican foods, a huge range of pasta, breads, fresh fruit and vegetables, wines and so on. And for "traditional" English food we have some of the best restaurants and chefs in the world.
 
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