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(Metro)   Copperhead viper not a fan of teenager's dancing routine   (metro.co.uk) divider line
    More: Scary, Snake, Paris Montgomery, teenager's mother Tracy, Bite, Agkistrodon contortrix, Yard, copperhead snake, Inch  
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3161 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 May 2020 at 10:16 AM (10 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-05-21 9:39:41 AM  
It's not in the article but that's in Huffman which is on the East side of Lake Houston.  I grew up on the South side of the lake below the dam and had a back yard that butted up against woods *exactly* like those in the video.  We (every kid in my neighborhood) learned to always be weary of these damn things.  If you had a wood pile, board, mat, *anything*, laying on the woods side of your yard, you lifted it up or kicked it over first to make sure there wasn't a freaking copperhead (or other) hiding in there.

I would mow over at least one a year as a teenager.  They are shiathead snakes which strike first and ask questions later.  They typically don't flee and go into defensive "mode" the instant they see/smell anything.  I've came close to getting bit by these things so many times I can't remember them all.
 
2020-05-21 9:40:41 AM  
Snakes are not poisonous, they are venomous.

Poison = you put it in you
Venom = animal puts it in you
 
2020-05-21 10:02:00 AM  
The only snake that ever pulled a "come at me bro" in all the years of trail running was a copperhead.

If not for a timely double leap off the same foot, he would have caught the other one.
I was seven miles in at the time.
 
2020-05-21 10:18:43 AM  
thumbs.gfycat.comView Full Size
 
2020-05-21 10:18:47 AM  

Walker: Snakes are not poisonous, they are venomous.

Poison = you put it in you
Venom = animal puts it in you


You must really cringe when people confuse cement and concrete.
 
2020-05-21 10:19:32 AM  
You can just barely see the guy. Small one?
 
2020-05-21 10:21:03 AM  

UberDave: It's not in the article but that's in Huffman which is on the East side of Lake Houston.  I grew up on the South side of the lake below the dam and had a back yard that butted up against woods *exactly* like those in the video.  We (every kid in my neighborhood) learned to always be weary of these damn things.  If you had a wood pile, board, mat, *anything*, laying on the woods side of your yard, you lifted it up or kicked it over first to make sure there wasn't a freaking copperhead (or other) hiding in there.

I would mow over at least one a year as a teenager.  They are shiathead snakes which strike first and ask questions later.  They typically don't flee and go into defensive "mode" the instant they see/smell anything.  I've came close to getting bit by these things so many times I can't remember them all.


Can confirm.  We have tons of copperheads here in NC.  Only snakes I've encountered that are bigger assholes are cottonmouths.  Those bastards will chase you.
 
2020-05-21 10:22:10 AM  
I bet a copperhead vaper would have liked the dance, though.
 
2020-05-21 10:23:41 AM  
imgc.allpostersimages.comView Full Size
 
2020-05-21 10:23:47 AM  
I don't like snakes to begin with. A good snake is a dead snake. This is just me but they are boring as pets unless you watch them eat.
 
2020-05-21 10:23:50 AM  
You never come back from Copperhead Road...
 
2020-05-21 10:24:12 AM  
You better stay away from copperhead yard!  DUH DUH DUH DUH-DUH!
 
2020-05-21 10:26:22 AM  
Barry Crocker: One-Eyed Trouser Snake
Youtube qvVFXg5U-Lo
 
2020-05-21 10:28:39 AM  
And that's $100K spent by the insurance company.

/It used to be 10% of that a few years ago
// Thanks Big Pharma
/// Nasty devils
 
2020-05-21 10:28:47 AM  
I would never risk a "dance" with Copperhead.
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.comView Full Size
 
2020-05-21 10:28:47 AM  

UberDave: It's not in the article but that's in Huffman which is on the East side of Lake Houston.  I grew up on the South side of the lake below the dam and had a back yard that butted up against woods *exactly* like those in the video.  We (every kid in my neighborhood) learned to always be weary of these damn things.  If you had a wood pile, board, mat, *anything*, laying on the woods side of your yard, you lifted it up or kicked it over first to make sure there wasn't a freaking copperhead (or other) hiding in there.

I would mow over at least one a year as a teenager.  They are shiathead snakes which strike first and ask questions later.  They typically don't flee and go into defensive "mode" the instant they see/smell anything.  I've came close to getting bit by these things so many times I can't remember them all.


So you kids got really tired of those damn things?
 
2020-05-21 10:29:09 AM  

Walker: Snakes are not poisonous, they are venomous.

Poison = you put it in you
Venom = animal puts it in you


What if you eat the snake, venom glands and all?
 
2020-05-21 10:30:36 AM  
Copperheads aren't friendly,
But a water moccasin will chase your ass around.
They are not to be trifled with.  One of the few animals I kill on sight.
 
2020-05-21 10:30:51 AM  

johnny_vegas: [YouTube video: Barry Crocker: One-Eyed Trouser Snake]


My favourite song from my favourite movie! The shining apex of Australian new wave cinema!

I've got a little creature, I s'pose you'd call him a pet
And if there's something wrong with him you don't need to call a vet
He goes everywhere that I go, whether sleeping or awake
God help me if I ever lose my little one eyed trouser snake...
 
2020-05-21 10:30:57 AM  

Russ1642: Walker: Snakes are not poisonous, they are venomous.

Poison = you put it in you
Venom = animal puts it in you

You must really cringe when people confuse cement and concrete.


Hey, this isn't some trivial distinction. It could save your life.
 
2020-05-21 10:32:49 AM  

Subtonic: Walker: Snakes are not poisonous, they are venomous.

Poison = you put it in you
Venom = animal puts it in you

What if you eat the snake, venom glands and all?


Venoms are generally not harmful if swallowed... assuming you have no open wounds in your mouth or throat. Most venoms are proteins that are destroyed in the digestive system.
 
2020-05-21 10:34:05 AM  

DippityDoo: Copperheads aren't friendly,
But a water moccasin will chase your ass around.
They are not to be trifled with.  One of the few animals I kill on sight.


I used to catch them by hand when I was a kid in South Carolina as a dare. If I had lived there longer than a year I probably would not have lived to adulthood.
 
2020-05-21 10:35:27 AM  

HailRobonia: Subtonic: Walker: Snakes are not poisonous, they are venomous.

Poison = you put it in you
Venom = animal puts it in you

What if you eat the snake, venom glands and all?

Venoms are generally not harmful if swallowed... assuming you have no open wounds in your mouth or throat. Most venoms are proteins that are destroyed in the digestive system.


Cool. My snake BBQ is back on.
 
2020-05-21 10:37:57 AM  

darth_badger: [thumbs.gfycat.com image 280x203] [View Full Size image _x_]


Username checks out

Badger, badger, badger....
 
2020-05-21 10:37:57 AM  

DippityDoo: But a water moccasin will chase your ass around.


Can confirm.  Growing up, I lived on a canal.  neighborhood party, us kids were swimming in the canal.  We start hearing people screaming for us to get out of the water, about 50 yards a way, a pair of moccasin's coming at us.  The host of the party rain inside and got his shotgun, 2 shots later, no more moccasins.  None of us were going to make it out in time as fast as they were.
 
2020-05-21 10:38:42 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-21 10:40:18 AM  

Subtonic: HailRobonia: Subtonic: Walker: Snakes are not poisonous, they are venomous.

Poison = you put it in you
Venom = animal puts it in you

What if you eat the snake, venom glands and all?

Venoms are generally not harmful if swallowed... assuming you have no open wounds in your mouth or throat. Most venoms are proteins that are destroyed in the digestive system.

Cool. My snake BBQ is back on.


Just cut off the head and bury it, the snake doesn't have to be alive for the venom take effect.
 
2020-05-21 10:42:37 AM  
HailRobonia:

Venoms are generally not harmful if swallowed... assuming you have no open wounds in your mouth or throat. Most venoms are proteins that are destroyed in the digestive system.

Ladies, are you listening? It's just protein. Harmless if swallowed.
 
2020-05-21 10:46:52 AM  
Came for Spot the Copperhead pics

Leaving disappointed
 
2020-05-21 10:50:33 AM  

Murflette: Came for Spot the Copperhead pics

Leaving disappointed


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-21 10:55:25 AM  
"Snakes won't bother you if you don't bother them"

True. But copperheads have a very low bother threshold and a huge sense of personal space. They're assholes.

That's why you never kill a black snake - they eat copperheads for breakfast. Literally.
 
2020-05-21 10:57:50 AM  

toetag: DippityDoo: But a water moccasin will chase your ass around.

Can confirm.  Growing up, I lived on a canal.  neighborhood party, us kids were swimming in the canal.  We start hearing people screaming for us to get out of the water, about 50 yards a way, a pair of moccasin's coming at us.  The host of the party rain inside and got his shotgun, 2 shots later, no more moccasins.  None of us were going to make it out in time as fast as they were.


Was hiking by a creek and one was on the other side.  luckily he made a bunch of noise coming down the bank.  He then swam straight for us and up the other bank.  His welcome present was me and my buddy beating him to death with our walking sticks.

I still recall my buddy dryly asking "what the fark was his problem?"
 
2020-05-21 11:00:31 AM  
I live in Houston, but I grew up here and have a healthy respect for the slitheries that were always out and about in my neighborhoods and nearby lakes. But we still played with most of the snakes we found. Always leave copperheads, rattlers and cottonmouths alone, like really farking alone, wide berth always given (cypress, in th emid 80's was still country af. my neighbors raised horses and llama's for ffa and the rodeo).

However, I learned, yesterday in fact, that opossums are being studied and possibly having their blood developed for antivenom for pit viper bites, because opossums seem to be relatively immune to these types of bites (all three listed uptop). I have opossums that run around my backyard, one had a baby this year and its the only time they are cute!). Now I have a reason to not try to kill them. Last year, before my big dog died of old age, he would always be after them, he has killed a couple, but now I only have my small dog and he is not at all interested in tangling with the opossums.

the antivenom for these snakes are one of the most expensive in the world, so this could be really really huge.

https://cen.acs.org/biological-chemis​t​ry/biochemistry/opossum-protein-lead-b​road-spectrum/96/i23
 
2020-05-21 11:00:54 AM  

Tchernobog: UberDave: It's not in the article but that's in Huffman which is on the East side of Lake Houston.  I grew up on the South side of the lake below the dam and had a back yard that butted up against woods *exactly* like those in the video.  We (every kid in my neighborhood) learned to always be weary of these damn things.  If you had a wood pile, board, mat, *anything*, laying on the woods side of your yard, you lifted it up or kicked it over first to make sure there wasn't a freaking copperhead (or other) hiding in there.

I would mow over at least one a year as a teenager.  They are shiathead snakes which strike first and ask questions later.  They typically don't flee and go into defensive "mode" the instant they see/smell anything.  I've came close to getting bit by these things so many times I can't remember them all.

Can confirm.  We have tons of copperheads here in NC.  Only snakes I've encountered that are bigger assholes are cottonmouths.  Those bastards will chase you.


In my experience, they don't.  Water moccasins/Cottonmouths have horrible eyesight and they are typically found in low lying areas protected from the wind.  Even when they know you are there, they don't go into defensive mode.  They "taste" the air more vigorously when alerted and as the air (that there is) in the areas they are typically found swirls around quite a bit, they can't pinpoint you.  You can be literally feet away and as long as you don't move, they can't easily see you.  If you or something touches them while they are alerted, however, they sprint off and sometimes that is towards you...hence people think they are chasing.

Take this one from a couple of years ago (I've posted this here before):

Fark user imageView Full Size


He was laying in that pool happily eating minnows and my young son and I observed him from maybe 3 feet away.  When we moved, he crawled to the position in the pic.  Later he stuck his head up "tasting" the air.  I was able to show my son how they rapidly moved *away* from any danger by lightly touching it with a long branch on it side.  You can almost corral the things.
 
2020-05-21 11:02:36 AM  

toetag: DippityDoo: But a water moccasin will chase your ass around.

Can confirm.  Growing up, I lived on a canal.  neighborhood party, us kids were swimming in the canal.  We start hearing people screaming for us to get out of the water, about 50 yards a way, a pair of moccasin's coming at us.  The host of the party rain inside and got his shotgun, 2 shots later, no more moccasins.  None of us were going to make it out in time as fast as they were.


I don't know.  Even with my fat ass, if I saw something like that coming I'd be like Michael Phelps with an bored-out, hopped up, nitro-injected 50 horse Evinrude strapped to his ass.
 
2020-05-21 11:04:06 AM  
That's all well and good, but I've personally been chased at least a couple dozen times by cottonmouths.  Working near water hazards on the golf course when I was in highschool was always exciting.
 
2020-05-21 11:09:23 AM  

UberDave: Tchernobog: UberDave: It's not in the article but that's in Huffman which is on the East side of Lake Houston.  I grew up on the South side of the lake below the dam and had a back yard that butted up against woods *exactly* like those in the video.  We (every kid in my neighborhood) learned to always be weary of these damn things.  If you had a wood pile, board, mat, *anything*, laying on the woods side of your yard, you lifted it up or kicked it over first to make sure there wasn't a freaking copperhead (or other) hiding in there.

I would mow over at least one a year as a teenager.  They are shiathead snakes which strike first and ask questions later.  They typically don't flee and go into defensive "mode" the instant they see/smell anything.  I've came close to getting bit by these things so many times I can't remember them all.

Can confirm.  We have tons of copperheads here in NC.  Only snakes I've encountered that are bigger assholes are cottonmouths.  Those bastards will chase you.

In my experience, they don't.  Water moccasins/Cottonmouths have horrible eyesight and they are typically found in low lying areas protected from the wind.  Even when they know you are there, they don't go into defensive mode.  They "taste" the air more vigorously when alerted and as the air (that there is) in the areas they are typically found swirls around quite a bit, they can't pinpoint you.  You can be literally feet away and as long as you don't move, they can't easily see you.  If you or something touches them while they are alerted, however, they sprint off and sometimes that is towards you...hence people think they are chasing.

Take this one from a couple of years ago (I've posted this here before):

[Fark user image image 850x637]

He was laying in that pool happily eating minnows and my young son and I observed him from maybe 3 feet away.  When we moved, he crawled to the position in the pic.  Later he stuck his head up "tasting" the air.  I was able to show my son how they rapidly moved *away* from any danger by lightly touching it with a long branch on it side.  You can almost corral the things.


Good to know there's nothing to worry about

Time to avoid social distancing with cottonmouths
 
2020-05-21 11:10:22 AM  

UberDave: Tchernobog: UberDave: It's not in the article but that's in Huffman which is on the East side of Lake Houston.  I grew up on the South side of the lake below the dam and had a back yard that butted up against woods *exactly* like those in the video.  We (every kid in my neighborhood) learned to always be weary of these damn things.  If you had a wood pile, board, mat, *anything*, laying on the woods side of your yard, you lifted it up or kicked it over first to make sure there wasn't a freaking copperhead (or other) hiding in there.

I would mow over at least one a year as a teenager.  They are shiathead snakes which strike first and ask questions later.  They typically don't flee and go into defensive "mode" the instant they see/smell anything.  I've came close to getting bit by these things so many times I can't remember them all.

Can confirm.  We have tons of copperheads here in NC.  Only snakes I've encountered that are bigger assholes are cottonmouths.  Those bastards will chase you.

In my experience, they don't.  Water moccasins/Cottonmouths have horrible eyesight and they are typically found in low lying areas protected from the wind.  Even when they know you are there, they don't go into defensive mode.  They "taste" the air more vigorously when alerted and as the air (that there is) in the areas they are typically found swirls around quite a bit, they can't pinpoint you.  You can be literally feet away and as long as you don't move, they can't easily see you.  If you or something touches them while they are alerted, however, they sprint off and sometimes that is towards you...hence people think they are chasing.

Take this one from a couple of years ago (I've posted this here before):

[Fark user image image 850x637]

He was laying in that pool happily eating minnows and my young son and I observed him from maybe 3 feet away.  When we moved, he crawled to the position in the pic.  Later he stuck his head up "tasting" the air.  I was able to show my son how they rapidly moved *away* from any danger by lightly touching it with a long branch on it side.  You can almost corral the things.


BREAKING NEWS!
YOUNG BOY BITTEN BY COTTONMOUTH SNAKE. SAYS FATHER "WAS POKING IT WITH A STICK"
MOMENTS BEFORE ATTACK.
 
2020-05-21 11:28:28 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-21 11:46:23 AM  
Dolly Parton - Sneaky Snake On The Dolly Show with Tom T.Hall 1976/77
Youtube iUacZasLM0o
 
2020-05-21 12:15:57 PM  

1funguy: UberDave: Tchernobog: UberDave: It's not in the article but that's in Huffman which is on the East side of Lake Houston.  I grew up on the South side of the lake below the dam and had a back yard that butted up against woods *exactly* like those in the video.  We (every kid in my neighborhood) learned to always be weary of these damn things.  If you had a wood pile, board, mat, *anything*, laying on the woods side of your yard, you lifted it up or kicked it over first to make sure there wasn't a freaking copperhead (or other) hiding in there.

I would mow over at least one a year as a teenager.  They are shiathead snakes which strike first and ask questions later.  They typically don't flee and go into defensive "mode" the instant they see/smell anything.  I've came close to getting bit by these things so many times I can't remember them all.

Can confirm.  We have tons of copperheads here in NC.  Only snakes I've encountered that are bigger assholes are cottonmouths.  Those bastards will chase you.

In my experience, they don't.  Water moccasins/Cottonmouths have horrible eyesight and they are typically found in low lying areas protected from the wind.  Even when they know you are there, they don't go into defensive mode.  They "taste" the air more vigorously when alerted and as the air (that there is) in the areas they are typically found swirls around quite a bit, they can't pinpoint you.  You can be literally feet away and as long as you don't move, they can't easily see you.  If you or something touches them while they are alerted, however, they sprint off and sometimes that is towards you...hence people think they are chasing.

Take this one from a couple of years ago (I've posted this here before):

[Fark user image image 850x637]

He was laying in that pool happily eating minnows and my young son and I observed him from maybe 3 feet away.  When we moved, he crawled to the position in the pic.  Later he stuck his head up "tasting" the air.  I was able to show ...


Yea well, we were told not to taunt the dynamite monkey, yet here we are, poking its farking head with a stick to see if its alive.

Which, in fairness, in Texas, that is exactly how you check to see if its alive, it is recommended that you use a long stick, but you know what they say.

I would also say, that growing up around them, cottonmouths smell a whole farking lot worse than we do, unless you dont bathe regularly.

As a kid, these were a real big problem around the lakes. We hung out around the docks and piers on the lake. These bast*rds would swim right up to the pier, and it was the worst around dusk and nightfall, you could be floating right by them or hangin with your lil feetsies in the water and not know they are about to rock your world. Thats why I always preferred the rattlesnakes. They warn you, repeatedly that they are not to be farked with. Copperheads, you just knew, do not hang out where they like to be. cottonmouths tho, if it starts to smell like your buddy pissed himself (not saying he didnt) but it was a good indication to get away
 
2020-05-21 12:55:50 PM  

Walker: Snakes are not poisonous, they are venomous.

Poison = you put it in you
Venom = animal puts it in you


Wow it only took one comment for someone like you to show up.

Thanks, this logic of yours is ALSO why companies can lie to us.
Natural means nothing, thus it can be used endlessly. Cooooool. That is what society needs? FTW! Lame.
 
2020-05-21 12:56:28 PM  

brizzle365: 1funguy: UberDave: Tchernobog: UberDave: (snip)

Yea well, we were told not to taunt the dynamite monkey, yet here we are, poking its farking head with a stick to see if its alive.


It's sometimes so hard to post in these threads because unless you explain details there's going to be people that take the default position that you are clueless with next to no experience.  Why is it so hard to give the benefit of the doubt?  Gently brushing a long leafy branch to harmlessly guide a snake away by touching some of the leaves to the side of it's body isn't "poking it in the head with a stick".  And even if I were poking it in the head, that's orders of magnitude better than what *most* people would have done.  Hell, a few months after that pic, some douche ran up on a 4' brown water snake in the nearby parking lot (of the park I was in) and killed it thinking it was a moccasin - then posted it to NextDoor and said they were "keeping the kids safe".

There's tons of snakes around here, especially in the park.  The main rule, *my* rule, is to stay back and observe and don't go all Steve Irwin.  So why wasn't that followed in the pic above?  It was the middle of the goddamn trail - swamp and forest on both sides.  The water in the pic is literally in ruts from the brush-hog that had recently mowed.  The choice was to turn back or gently guide the snake off the path, if it moved whilst walking around it, and giving me the opportunity to show my son how they behaved.  So I took that option, making sure not to "poke it in the head."
 
2020-05-21 1:46:15 PM  

UberDave: brizzle365: 1funguy: UberDave: Tchernobog: UberDave: (snip)

Yea well, we were told not to taunt the dynamite monkey, yet here we are, poking its farking head with a stick to see if its alive.

It's sometimes so hard to post in these threads because unless you explain details there's going to be people that take the default position that you are clueless with next to no experience.  Why is it so hard to give the benefit of the doubt?  Gently brushing a long leafy branch to harmlessly guide a snake away by touching some of the leaves to the side of it's body isn't "poking it in the head with a stick".  And even if I were poking it in the head, that's orders of magnitude better than what *most* people would have done.  Hell, a few months after that pic, some douche ran up on a 4' brown water snake in the nearby parking lot (of the park I was in) and killed it thinking it was a moccasin - then posted it to NextDoor and said they were "keeping the kids safe".

There's tons of snakes around here, especially in the park.  The main rule, *my* rule, is to stay back and observe and don't go all Steve Irwin.  So why wasn't that followed in the pic above?  It was the middle of the goddamn trail - swamp and forest on both sides.  The water in the pic is literally in ruts from the brush-hog that had recently mowed.  The choice was to turn back or gently guide the snake off the path, if it moved whilst walking around it, and giving me the opportunity to show my son how they behaved.  So I took that option, making sure not to "poke it in the head."


I'll be honest with you, I think people need to get out a bit more, durring these times. People are missing out on humor and sarcasam. The dynamite line was a joke and reff towards the times we are in, some want nothing more than to poke the monkey, it didn't really mean anything towards your post or you.

Im with you that most people don't use common sense while in nature (she scary). The poking it in the head, is more a ref to something that happened when I was a kid. It was 4th of July and we all gathered in the street to pop off fireworks and hangout with friends. My friends lil yappy ass chihuahua came running down their driveway and in to the street and was hit by a car. Buddies dad, who had a flashlight, tapped it on the head with said flashlight and was like "ahhyep, she is dead" lol.

But on the flip side of that, there are people out there who have never seen these types of snakes, either do not live in the area or newly moved down here, some folks will appreciate the heads up. And this being fark, we all gotta throw our CSB out there.
 
2020-05-21 2:31:37 PM  

brizzle365: UberDave: brizzle365: 1funguy: UberDave: Tchernobog: UberDave: (snip)

Yea well, we were told not to taunt the dynamite monkey, yet here we are, poking its farking head with a stick to see if its alive.

It's sometimes so hard to post in these threads because unless you explain details there's going to be people that take the default position that you are clueless with next to no experience.  Why is it so hard to give the benefit of the doubt?  Gently brushing a long leafy branch to harmlessly guide a snake away by touching some of the leaves to the side of it's body isn't "poking it in the head with a stick".  And even if I were poking it in the head, that's orders of magnitude better than what *most* people would have done.  Hell, a few months after that pic, some douche ran up on a 4' brown water snake in the nearby parking lot (of the park I was in) and killed it thinking it was a moccasin - then posted it to NextDoor and said they were "keeping the kids safe".

There's tons of snakes around here, especially in the park.  The main rule, *my* rule, is to stay back and observe and don't go all Steve Irwin.  So why wasn't that followed in the pic above?  It was the middle of the goddamn trail - swamp and forest on both sides.  The water in the pic is literally in ruts from the brush-hog that had recently mowed.  The choice was to turn back or gently guide the snake off the path, if it moved whilst walking around it, and giving me the opportunity to show my son how they behaved.  So I took that option, making sure not to "poke it in the head."

I'll be honest with you, I think people need to get out a bit more, durring these times. People are missing out on humor and sarcasam. The dynamite line was a joke and reff towards the times we are in, some want nothing more than to poke the monkey, it didn't really mean anything towards your post or you.


I apologize.  I thought about that after posting and figured that may be what it was.  And you are absolutely correct, people are missing out (definitely including myself).  Aside from missing sarcasm, I have also found my posts lacking in my usual humor/idiocy.  And I *am* on edge a little more than usual since all this started.  I'll have to be more mindful.

I suppose I should do some calming meditation but my space for that is a farking school room now. (sigh)
 
2020-05-21 2:42:16 PM  

UberDave: brizzle365: UberDave: brizzle365: 1funguy: UberDave: Tchernobog: UberDave: (snip)

Yea well, we were told not to taunt the dynamite monkey, yet here we are, poking its farking head with a stick to see if its alive.

It's sometimes so hard to post in these threads because unless you explain details there's going to be people that take the default position that you are clueless with next to no experience.  Why is it so hard to give the benefit of the doubt?  Gently brushing a long leafy branch to harmlessly guide a snake away by touching some of the leaves to the side of it's body isn't "poking it in the head with a stick".  And even if I were poking it in the head, that's orders of magnitude better than what *most* people would have done.  Hell, a few months after that pic, some douche ran up on a 4' brown water snake in the nearby parking lot (of the park I was in) and killed it thinking it was a moccasin - then posted it to NextDoor and said they were "keeping the kids safe".

There's tons of snakes around here, especially in the park.  The main rule, *my* rule, is to stay back and observe and don't go all Steve Irwin.  So why wasn't that followed in the pic above?  It was the middle of the goddamn trail - swamp and forest on both sides.  The water in the pic is literally in ruts from the brush-hog that had recently mowed.  The choice was to turn back or gently guide the snake off the path, if it moved whilst walking around it, and giving me the opportunity to show my son how they behaved.  So I took that option, making sure not to "poke it in the head."

I'll be honest with you, I think people need to get out a bit more, durring these times. People are missing out on humor and sarcasam. The dynamite line was a joke and reff towards the times we are in, some want nothing more than to poke the monkey, it didn't really mean anything towards your post or you.

I apologize.  I thought about that after posting and figured that may be what it was.  And you are absolutely ...


CSB:

last night the power at my house went out. So I stepped outside to see whats going on, the entire street, including the side streets in to the neighborhood was pitch black. Everyone on the street did the same, my first thought, jokingly, of course, (i see them every all the time, on the way to work, in their yards, walking dogs etc) was, "holy shiat, my neighbors are still alive! good for them!"

But it was kinda cool to see everyone outside like that, with flashlights and cellphone lights.
 
2020-05-21 2:47:18 PM  

UberDave: brizzle365: UberDave: brizzle365: 1funguy: UberDave: Tchernobog: UberDave: (snip)

Yea well, we were told not to taunt the dynamite monkey, yet here we are, poking its farking head with a stick to see if its alive.

It's sometimes so hard to post in these threads because unless you explain details there's going to be people that take the default position that you are clueless with next to no experience.  Why is it so hard to give the benefit of the doubt?  Gently brushing a long leafy branch to harmlessly guide a snake away by touching some of the leaves to the side of it's body isn't "poking it in the head with a stick".  And even if I were poking it in the head, that's orders of magnitude better than what *most* people would have done.  Hell, a few months after that pic, some douche ran up on a 4' brown water snake in the nearby parking lot (of the park I was in) and killed it thinking it was a moccasin - then posted it to NextDoor and said they were "keeping the kids safe".

There's tons of snakes around here, especially in the park.  The main rule, *my* rule, is to stay back and observe and don't go all Steve Irwin.  So why wasn't that followed in the pic above?  It was the middle of the goddamn trail - swamp and forest on both sides.  The water in the pic is literally in ruts from the brush-hog that had recently mowed.  The choice was to turn back or gently guide the snake off the path, if it moved whilst walking around it, and giving me the opportunity to show my son how they behaved.  So I took that option, making sure not to "poke it in the head."

I'll be honest with you, I think people need to get out a bit more, durring these times. People are missing out on humor and sarcasam. The dynamite line was a joke and reff towards the times we are in, some want nothing more than to poke the monkey, it didn't really mean anything towards your post or you.

I apologize.  I thought about that after posting and figured that may be what it was.  And you are absolutely ...


Somewhat kidding and its terribly cliched, but that calming space for meditation, is inside you, you just need to reach the lvl to where you can block everything else out. For me, I enjoy nature and thats my calming meditative space, so being in the city, there is no such thing as silence. So in my minds eye, I picture all of the unnatural noises to be animals and creatures that are in or could have been in nature in the past. Loud lawnmowers/leaf blowers can be dinosaurs, alien creatures, or whatever. For me, its all about allowing my mind to be creative, within itself and explore the library of memory and thought on its own without external influence.

Its entertaining and can be interesting to see what my mind comes up with to replace the sounds. Good luck getting to that center of relaxation.
 
2020-05-21 3:39:46 PM  

brizzle365: Somewhat kidding and its terribly cliched, but that calming space for meditation, is inside you, you just need to reach the lvl to where you can block everything else out. For me, I enjoy nature and thats my calming meditative space, so being in the city, there is no such thing as silence. So in my minds eye, I picture all of the unnatural noises to be animals and creatures that are in or could have been in nature in the past. Loud lawnmowers/leaf blowers can be dinosaurs, alien creatures, or whatever. For me, its all about allowing my mind to be creative, within itself and explore the library of memory and thought on its own without external influence.

Its entertaining and can be interesting to see what my mind comes up with to replace the sounds. Good luck getting to that center of relaxation.


There's been a couple of people tell me the same thing on here when the topic has come up.  It has become more difficult to do such as I've gotten older but some people insist that it is simply being out of practice and that may be so.  I know, that when I am out in the mountains, I am super relaxed.

I have some "naturesque" VR programs that work really well with the HTC Vive pro and work well for meditation/calming.

/No snakes
//That I've seen
 
2020-05-21 4:24:13 PM  

Subtonic: HailRobonia: Subtonic: Walker: Snakes are not poisonous, they are venomous.

Poison = you put it in you
Venom = animal puts it in you

What if you eat the snake, venom glands and all?

Venoms are generally not harmful if swallowed... assuming you have no open wounds in your mouth or throat. Most venoms are proteins that are destroyed in the digestive system.

Cool. My snake BBQ is back on.


Bitis Bitis Qobra?
 
2020-05-21 4:34:17 PM  

UberDave: brizzle365: Somewhat kidding and its terribly cliched, but that calming space for meditation, is inside you, you just need to reach the lvl to where you can block everything else out. For me, I enjoy nature and thats my calming meditative space, so being in the city, there is no such thing as silence. So in my minds eye, I picture all of the unnatural noises to be animals and creatures that are in or could have been in nature in the past. Loud lawnmowers/leaf blowers can be dinosaurs, alien creatures, or whatever. For me, its all about allowing my mind to be creative, within itself and explore the library of memory and thought on its own without external influence.

Its entertaining and can be interesting to see what my mind comes up with to replace the sounds. Good luck getting to that center of relaxation.

There's been a couple of people tell me the same thing on here when the topic has come up.  It has become more difficult to do such as I've gotten older but some people insist that it is simply being out of practice and that may be so.  I know, that when I am out in the mountains, I am super relaxed.

I have some "naturesque" VR programs that work really well with the HTC Vive pro and work well for meditation/calming.

/No snakes
//That I've seen


meditation is a rather personal experience, so its totally understandable why others methods don't work.
It honestly took me years to even get in a  meditative state, much less to where I could somewhat control the environment that I am in.

I've read, likely all anecdotal, but still, that its very difficult to meditate with electronic devises. I have a very active imagination, so I've never tried it.Separately, I do not have the ability to control my dreams. Thats a part of my sub-conscience that I actively stay away from. Most of my dreams have always been negative and involving people with whom I cared very deeply for, continuing to hurt/use me or just simply the loss of family members who were very important. So I just don't go there, I don't lucid dream. I did there for a while when I was giving chantix a go to quit smoking, tho, those dreams were mostly just very freaking creepy (like cats climbing in to my window to fark the duck that i had as a pet when I was a kid and the only way to prevent it, was to allow my current dog to fark the cats, so they would go away, chantix is some scary shiat) and kinda reinforced my rationality to not engage my dreams further or that part of my brain. Its better for everyone that way. Chanjtix also kicked my normally mostly mild (by my standards) depression in to a much higher gear and one I wasn't comfortable with. I'll take my chances with cancer one day than to go to those places again. I getting more and more ok with the form of depression that I already have, which is a very dangerous opinion to have, i think.

Just keep at it and little by little you will get back there. Its not like you just magically started to meditate overnight and were able to gain control without a great deal of practice and failure.
 
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