Skip to content
Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Atlas Obscura)   Tips for responsible drinking from 16th-century Germany   (atlasobscura.com) divider line
    More: PSA, Drinking culture, Alcoholic beverage, name Vincent Obsopoeus, Drink, Michael Fontaine, Ovid, Dionysus, Art of Imbibing  
•       •       •

3148 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 May 2020 at 12:02 PM (12 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



27 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-05-18 9:48:48 AM  
Fun stuff. This shiat never gets old. Apparently literally.
 
2020-05-18 11:20:27 AM  
"friends whose quality and loyalty are proven and unmistakable, time after time."

Ride or Die Protocol engaged
 
2020-05-18 11:28:51 AM  

Urmuf Hamer: never gets old.

"'When guys are drunk,' he wrote, 'they brag about their hard-as-wood erections" and "spill the beans about raunchy sexual bouts' ...calling out the drinkers for their glorification of 'bro' culture,'"


Tom_Slick: "friends whose quality and loyalty are proven and unmistakable, time after time."

Ride or Die Protocol engaged

"make sure your friend's running the same race you are. I'm speaking from experience."

 
2020-05-18 11:39:09 AM  
if i lived in the 16th century, i would drink very heavily
 
2020-05-18 12:02:55 PM  
Try to limit yourself to two beers for breakfast.
 
2020-05-18 12:09:29 PM  
hospital patients were allowed to drink nearly two gallons of wine per day.

I mean really, if you were in a 1500's hospital, wouldn't you want to be drunk all day?
 
2020-05-18 12:09:54 PM  
In vino non veritas.
 
2020-05-18 12:11:25 PM  
I love Atlas Obscura

/librarian

bonus thing

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles​/​plague-cures
 
2020-05-18 12:15:11 PM  
I'll just leave this here....

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-18 12:19:18 PM  
16th century Germany? Drink all you want at the Venusberg.
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-18 12:23:18 PM  

Arkanaut: Try to limit yourself to two beers for breakfast.


Juice is OK though. Germans eliminate all of that.
 
2020-05-18 12:28:24 PM  
How to drink:

media1.tenor.comView Full Size
 
2020-05-18 12:30:50 PM  
Ancient Greeks were wusses when it came to drinking.

Seriously, they mixed their wine with water.  Later historians claim it was due to how strong the wine was (the Greeks considered anyone who didn't to be drunks), but I've never heard of any strain of yeast that would make such strong wine (and distillation was much later).  The Romans might have drunk more, but not much more.

Now the Ancient Egyptians were all about their beer.  But I really don't know the quantity that they drank.  Plenty of other ancient civilizations love their booze as well.

/I expect those who worshiped Dionysus were more farkerish
//although they probably got too much to be farkers
///this slashie is under the table
 
2020-05-18 12:52:52 PM  
You're a mean drunk, Germany.
 
2020-05-18 12:54:59 PM  

yet_another_wumpus: Ancient Greeks were wusses when it came to drinking.

Seriously, they mixed their wine with water.  Later historians claim it was due to how strong the wine was (the Greeks considered anyone who didn't to be drunks), but I've never heard of any strain of yeast that would make such strong wine (and distillation was much later).  The Romans might have drunk more, but not much more.

Now the Ancient Egyptians were all about their beer.  But I really don't know the quantity that they drank.  Plenty of other ancient civilizations love their booze as well.

/I expect those who worshiped Dionysus were more farkerish
//although they probably got too much to be farkers
///this slashie is under the table


The ancients were into "session drinking".  Beer and wine were drunk not so much to get plastered, but because you knew you wouldn't get sick from drinking it.  The ancients didn't know about alcohol as a chemical or about germs and why alcohol killed them, they just knew beer and wine were "healthy".  Getting hammered was mainly a pleasant side-effect.
 
2020-05-18 1:01:47 PM  

Mouser: yet_another_wumpus: Ancient Greeks were wusses when it came to drinking.

Seriously, they mixed their wine with water.  Later historians claim it was due to how strong the wine was (the Greeks considered anyone who didn't to be drunks), but I've never heard of any strain of yeast that would make such strong wine (and distillation was much later).  The Romans might have drunk more, but not much more.

Now the Ancient Egyptians were all about their beer.  But I really don't know the quantity that they drank.  Plenty of other ancient civilizations love their booze as well.

/I expect those who worshiped Dionysus were more farkerish
//although they probably got too much to be farkers
///this slashie is under the table

The ancients were into "session drinking".  Beer and wine were drunk not so much to get plastered, but because you knew you wouldn't get sick from drinking it.  The ancients didn't know about alcohol as a chemical or about germs and why alcohol killed them, they just knew beer and wine were "healthy".  Getting hammered was mainly a pleasant side-effect.


Water to taste was certainly a thing, women were expected to water the wine to nonexistence.

And there was light ale for children & pregnant women during the middle ages, this counts as near beer as the alcohol content was very low
 
2020-05-18 1:23:26 PM  
Party like it's 1599.
 
2020-05-18 1:38:31 PM  

yet_another_wumpus: Ancient Greeks were wusses when it came to drinking.

Seriously, they mixed their wine with water. Later historians claim it was due to how strong the wine was (the Greeks considered anyone who didn't to be drunks), but I've never heard of any strain of yeast that would make such strong wine (and distillation was much later).  The Romans might have drunk more, but not much more.

Now the Ancient Egyptians were all about their beer.  But I really don't know the quantity that they drank.  Plenty of other ancient civilizations love their booze as well.

/I expect those who worshiped Dionysus were more farkerish
//although they probably got too much to be farkers
///this slashie is under the table


Firstly, most cultures mixed water into their wine as most water wasn't safe to drink. In order to stay hydrated, you needed to dilute the wine fairly well in order to not walk around drunk all the time yet kill any pathogens.

As far as yeast goes, even today the most highly refined champagne yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) can only obtain about 18% ABV by fermentation alone as at that point, the alcohol kills the yeast colony.
As you mentioned, it's highly unlikely their wine was more than 10-12% ABV if that, as the grapes would be harvested earlier with lower sugar content.
 
2020-05-18 1:38:58 PM  

fragMasterFlash: Party like it's 1599.


1501
 
2020-05-18 1:41:59 PM  

Jimmy's getting angry: yet_another_wumpus: Ancient Greeks were wusses when it came to drinking.

Seriously, they mixed their wine with water. Later historians claim it was due to how strong the wine was (the Greeks considered anyone who didn't to be drunks), but I've never heard of any strain of yeast that would make such strong wine (and distillation was much later).  The Romans might have drunk more, but not much more.

Now the Ancient Egyptians were all about their beer.  But I really don't know the quantity that they drank.  Plenty of other ancient civilizations love their booze as well.

/I expect those who worshiped Dionysus were more farkerish
//although they probably got too much to be farkers
///this slashie is under the table

Firstly, most cultures mixed water into their wine as most water wasn't safe to drink. In order to stay hydrated, you needed to dilute the wine fairly well in order to not walk around drunk all the time yet kill any pathogens.

As far as yeast goes, even today the most highly refined champagne yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) can only obtain about 18% ABV by fermentation alone as at that point, the alcohol kills the yeast colony.
As you mentioned, it's highly unlikely their wine was more than 10-12% ABV if that, as the grapes would be harvested earlier with lower sugar content.


I would posit as high as 20% which is certainly respectable
Are you sure about the early harvest? The Romans preferred sweeter wine - to the point of adding honey  lead
 
2020-05-18 1:48:38 PM  
 
2020-05-18 1:57:37 PM  

Cornelis de Gyselaer: Jimmy's getting angry: yet_another_wumpus: Ancient Greeks were wusses when it came to drinking.

Seriously, they mixed their wine with water. Later historians claim it was due to how strong the wine was (the Greeks considered anyone who didn't to be drunks), but I've never heard of any strain of yeast that would make such strong wine (and distillation was much later).  The Romans might have drunk more, but not much more.

Now the Ancient Egyptians were all about their beer.  But I really don't know the quantity that they drank.  Plenty of other ancient civilizations love their booze as well.

/I expect those who worshiped Dionysus were more farkerish
//although they probably got too much to be farkers
///this slashie is under the table

Firstly, most cultures mixed water into their wine as most water wasn't safe to drink. In order to stay hydrated, you needed to dilute the wine fairly well in order to not walk around drunk all the time yet kill any pathogens.

As far as yeast goes, even today the most highly refined champagne yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) can only obtain about 18% ABV by fermentation alone as at that point, the alcohol kills the yeast colony.
As you mentioned, it's highly unlikely their wine was more than 10-12% ABV if that, as the grapes would be harvested earlier with lower sugar content.

I would posit as high as 20% which is certainly respectable
Are you sure about the early harvest? The Romans preferred sweeter wine - to the point of adding honey  lead


From what I've read, due to various molds and other fungus the grapes would be harvested earlier as there were no fungicides used. As far as 20% ABV fermentations, I've heard people claiming it, yet I'm yet to see proof. I've fermented things for decades, and using the best champagne yeast available and even step feeding the sugars, I've only ever reached 18% ABV.
Cheers
 
2020-05-18 2:05:34 PM  

Jimmy's getting angry: Cornelis de Gyselaer: Jimmy's getting angry: yet_another_wumpus: Ancient Greeks were wusses when it came to drinking.

Seriously, they mixed their wine with water. Later historians claim it was due to how strong the wine was (the Greeks considered anyone who didn't to be drunks), but I've never heard of any strain of yeast that would make such strong wine (and distillation was much later).  The Romans might have drunk more, but not much more.

Now the Ancient Egyptians were all about their beer.  But I really don't know the quantity that they drank.  Plenty of other ancient civilizations love their booze as well.

/I expect those who worshiped Dionysus were more farkerish
//although they probably got too much to be farkers
///this slashie is under the table

Firstly, most cultures mixed water into their wine as most water wasn't safe to drink. In order to stay hydrated, you needed to dilute the wine fairly well in order to not walk around drunk all the time yet kill any pathogens.

As far as yeast goes, even today the most highly refined champagne yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) can only obtain about 18% ABV by fermentation alone as at that point, the alcohol kills the yeast colony.
As you mentioned, it's highly unlikely their wine was more than 10-12% ABV if that, as the grapes would be harvested earlier with lower sugar content.

I would posit as high as 20% which is certainly respectable
Are you sure about the early harvest? The Romans preferred sweeter wine - to the point of adding honey  lead

From what I've read, due to various molds and other fungus the grapes would be harvested earlier as there were no fungicides used. As far as 20% ABV fermentations, I've heard people claiming it, yet I'm yet to see proof. I've fermented things for decades, and using the best champagne yeast available and even step feeding the sugars, I've only ever reached 18% ABV.
Cheers


I can believe that, since you grok this stuff, what to they do to fortify Port?
I could certainly see a typical historian seeing 18% and either going "almost" 20 to be safe or fudging to 20%
I should look up what aromatics were used -- wormwood would certainly have an effect I am sure other mild mind altering substances might be tried

Sugar of lead, could that have a mind altering effect (since no one would use that now)?
 
2020-05-18 2:11:45 PM  
The beer was a lot safer than the water then because you boil the water when you make beer.

They didn't know that of course.
 
2020-05-18 2:24:38 PM  

Erebus1954: The beer was a lot safer than the water then because you boil the water when you make beer.

They didn't know that of course.


True enough, but they knew it worked, even if killing the evil spirits was the rationale
 
2020-05-18 2:51:55 PM  
Got impatient & looked it up
Fortified wines are done with various distilled spirits -- like brandy
 
2020-05-18 9:02:46 PM  

Cornelis de Gyselaer: Erebus1954: The beer was a lot safer than the water then because you boil the water when you make beer.

They didn't know that of course.

True enough, but they knew it worked, even if killing the evil spirits was the rationale


Kinda like drinking bleach.
 
Displayed 27 of 27 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter




In Other Media
X
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.