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(AP News)   Never letting a perfectly good crisis go to waste, many state and local governments are now using the pandemic as an excuse to shield public records   (apnews.com) divider line
    More: Asinine, Government, Official, Associated Press, United States, public records requirements, Office, State, Delay  
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956 clicks; posted to Politics » on 18 May 2020 at 6:00 PM (7 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



6 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-05-18 10:50:57 AM  
I don't see the sunshine laws changing.  Nobody's in the records offices though, and that kind of makes it difficult to get records.  Shocking.
 
2020-05-18 11:44:10 AM  
Seems reasonable enough.
 
2020-05-18 12:30:48 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: I don't see the sunshine laws changing.  Nobody's in the records offices though, and that kind of makes it difficult to get records.  Shocking.


It's not just the people in the records office, though.  A lot of these FOIA requests require other staff members to dig through physical files and folders to provide the needed answers.  That's tough to do when offices are closed.

The problem is that the FOIAs are written with timelines imbedded.  It is impossible to meet those timelines during things like, hmmm, a pandemic where access to offices and staff is limited.
 
2020-05-18 6:08:10 PM  
This is just one of many examples of crisis opportunism we see going on now...it's almost like certain people in power are asking themselves how can I benefit myself while making everything worse for everyone else.
/....Jared, don't be shy doll boy
 
2020-05-18 6:24:02 PM  
a lot of city services have been reimagined due to the virus.
if you want to submit construction documents for permit, you are better off pursuing an electronic submittal option because, firstly, the offices are closed, second you can mail in hardcopies but those will go straight to quarantine for a few weeks (slows down the process).
i like the electronic submittal process, it cuts down on paper consumption & travel time. just seems to be a more efficient way of conducting business (that business anyways).

i get it.
 
2020-05-18 6:28:36 PM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: Marcus Aurelius: I don't see the sunshine laws changing.  Nobody's in the records offices though, and that kind of makes it difficult to get records.  Shocking.

It's not just the people in the records office, though.  A lot of these FOIA requests require other staff members to dig through physical files and folders to provide the needed answers.  That's tough to do when offices are closed.

The problem is that the FOIAs are written with timelines imbedded.  It is impossible to meet those timelines during things like, hmmm, a pandemic where access to offices and staff is limited.


Ugh, you stupid "reasonable" people and your stupid reasonable, basically benign, non-conspiracist answers for why things aren't working like they should during a global infectious disease pandemic.

How the hell am I supposed to always be the aggrieved victim, huh? HUH?
 
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