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(The Week)   Wait, we have a sourdough library?   (theweek.com) divider line
    More: Giggity, Wheat, Flour, Klondike Gold Rush, Bread, Sourdough, Sourdough bread, Karl de Smedt, Durum  
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401 clicks; posted to Food » on 18 May 2020 at 8:29 AM (2 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



8 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-05-18 12:29:46 AM  
No. Belgium has a sourdough library.

We have giant balls of string.
 
2020-05-18 1:39:19 AM  
Two years ago, I was in the Yukon. I started collecting a sourdough in Seattle from Bainbridge Island and on the road, someone joined me from Alaska with her sample. And so, I collected samples that go back to the Klondike gold rush. And to me, that was one of the most amazing things. I was like a kid in the candy store.

Hey!  I have that starter!  Or at least one of its relatives.  My landlady gave me gold rush starter shortly after I moved in, when she found out I bake.  It's really good.  Mellow.  Sour, but not biting.  A little cheesy in a way - high in umami notes, maybe?  Everybody here uses that starter.  I also have Oregon Trail starter (mild tasting and slower to rise, but it makes amazing waffles) and San Francisco starter (Sour.  Sharp enough to cut your tongue on it.)  I always come back to that gold rush starter, though.

I find it amazing that someone came here during the Klondike gold rush and made that starter, and people in this town have been growing it, sharing it and baking bread with it ever since.  It may sound hokey, but it makes me feel like a part of the community, connected to a long line of Alaskans going back over 100 years, all sharing this amazing, living thing that takes flour and water and a little salt and makes into something that can sustain you.  And I think I would recognize my town's sourdough in a blind taste test.  It's noticeably different from other sourdoughs I've had.

/I used to have an Indianapolis starter (I made it from flour and water there, cultivating local wild yeasts.)  Let's just say it was the Toledo Window Box of sourdough.  I gave up on it ever being good after about 2 years of tending it.

//Yeah, I'm a baking geek.

///Yer god damn right, three.
 
2020-05-18 8:46:59 AM  

homeless_need_help: No. Belgium has a sourdough library.

We have giant balls of string.


Found the Minnesotan!
 
2020-05-18 9:56:33 AM  
So... food libraries are real?

(nsfw)

Food Library | Metalocalypse | Adult Swim
Youtube VB32073N4vY
 
2020-05-18 10:16:47 AM  
Meet the Man Behind the World's Only Sourdough Library
Youtube HX0sWkye4yo
 
2020-05-18 11:30:30 AM  
A Belgium library of wild yeasts?

So is anyone making sure to preserve the lambics?
 
2020-05-18 12:29:53 PM  

homeless_need_help: No. Belgium has a sourdough library.

We have giant balls of string.


Well ayckshually I think I heard that NC State has one of these, too
 
2020-05-18 3:09:25 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Two years ago, I was in the Yukon. I started collecting a sourdough in Seattle from Bainbridge Island and on the road, someone joined me from Alaska with her sample. And so, I collected samples that go back to the Klondike gold rush. And to me, that was one of the most amazing things. I was like a kid in the candy store.

Hey!  I have that starter!  Or at least one of its relatives.  My landlady gave me gold rush starter shortly after I moved in, when she found out I bake.  It's really good.  Mellow.  Sour, but not biting.  A little cheesy in a way - high in umami notes, maybe?  Everybody here uses that starter.  I also have Oregon Trail starter (mild tasting and slower to rise, but it makes amazing waffles) and San Francisco starter (Sour.  Sharp enough to cut your tongue on it.)  I always come back to that gold rush starter, though.

I find it amazing that someone came here during the Klondike gold rush and made that starter, and people in this town have been growing it, sharing it and baking bread with it ever since.  It may sound hokey, but it makes me feel like a part of the community, connected to a long line of Alaskans going back over 100 years, all sharing this amazing, living thing that takes flour and water and a little salt and makes into something that can sustain you.  And I think I would recognize my town's sourdough in a blind taste test.  It's noticeably different from other sourdoughs I've had.

/I used to have an Indianapolis starter (I made it from flour and water there, cultivating local wild yeasts.)  Let's just say it was the Toledo Window Box of sourdough.  I gave up on it ever being good after about 2 years of tending it.

//Yeah, I'm a baking geek.

///Yer god damn right, three.


Typically, they didn't make the starter when they got there, they brought it with them.
 
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