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(The Atlantic)   What's it like being stuck at home with a 20 year-old college student?   (theatlantic.com) divider line
    More: Awkward, Barnard College, Anxiety, New York City, have lunch, family's go, Vivian Solon, That that is is that that is not is not is that it it is, Kate's 16-year-old brother  
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615 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 18 May 2020 at 5:32 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-05-17 10:09:15 PM  
Is she hot?
 
2020-05-18 1:59:29 AM  
As long as I get to choose the student, I will gladly put in the necessary effort to properly answer that question.
 
2020-05-18 4:35:54 AM  
Um, who cares?
 
2020-05-18 4:57:04 AM  

cretinbob: Is she hot?


I think I've seen that film.
 
2020-05-18 5:51:25 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-18 7:13:37 AM  
Upper middle class problems.  Millions of young people live at home with their parents while they commute to community colleges, local universities, or they don't go to school, but go to work instead.  Or maybe they work and go to school.  We have 20 year olds in the military serving overseas.    Yes, I am sure it is a bitter pill to swallow that you miss out on what is really more of a rite of passage than an actual period of enrichment for the privileged, elite classes, but considering that this pandemic in terms of both the disease and the economic effects of the lockdowns are hitting the most vulnerable people disproportionately, as all crises do, maybe sit this one out, chief.  I have a hard time weeping for you adjusting to having your daughter not "experience New York for a few years" and her sense of loss at that no matter how much you think you care about others.
 
2020-05-18 7:24:26 AM  
"Do you miss your friends?" I asked.
"What do you mean 'Do I miss my friends?'!" she rejoined. "I think everyone misses human interaction that's not with the people you've been stuck with for going on two months ... I just miss having people who are going through what I'm going through. We're all going through the same thing, but one of the hardest things for the transition has been that I'm the one who's coming back. Everyone else in my house-you three lived here. What don't I miss about my friends?"


Yeah, she's a sophomore, all right.
 
2020-05-18 7:50:46 AM  
As a nursing infant, she spent her first Thanksgiving in Tallahassee, in the thick of the 2000 Florida presidential recount. As a toddler, she experienced the 9/11 attacks in Washington, D.C., and the nanny of one of her playmates was killed by the D.C. sniper that same fall. She has lived her whole life in the shadow of momentous, tumultuous events.

I hate this kind of writing. Three events that happened before she was even a school child mean she has "lived her entire life in the shadows of tumultuous events."
 
2020-05-18 8:00:22 AM  

holdmybones: As a nursing infant, she spent her first Thanksgiving in Tallahassee, in the thick of the 2000 Florida presidential recount. As a toddler, she experienced the 9/11 attacks in Washington, D.C., and the nanny of one of her playmates was killed by the D.C. sniper that same fall. She has lived her whole life in the shadow of momentous, tumultuous events.

I hate this kind of writing. Three events that happened before she was even a school child mean she has "lived her entire life in the shadows of tumultuous events."



This is a reporter or columnist trying to write like Dickens or Hugo.  Dramatic foreshadowing.

You're not supposed to use that technique when writing about current events, because you kinda have to know what the ending is going to be in order for the foreshadowing to make any sense.
 
2020-05-18 8:18:01 AM  

holdmybones: As a nursing infant, she spent her first Thanksgiving in Tallahassee, in the thick of the 2000 Florida presidential recount. As a toddler, she experienced the 9/11 attacks in Washington, D.C., and the nanny of one of her playmates was killed by the D.C. sniper that same fall. She has lived her whole life in the shadow of momentous, tumultuous events.

I hate this kind of writing. Three events that happened before she was even a school child mean she has "lived her entire life in the shadows of tumultuous events."


I used to love the Atlantic, but this is the sort of self-indulgent, supercilious, haughty nonsense that had me drop my subscription a while ago.
 
2020-05-18 8:18:23 AM  
I  was working in the living room while my son finished his semester in the dining room on Zoom, So I sometimes got to hear a bit of his classes,  and i was a bit struck when a few of the profs "checked in" with their students how hard the isolation was hitting some of them.  One girl who was way more aware of her mental health than I was at her age said "I specifically set my schedule to make sure I was at school (it's largely a commuter campus) and interacting with people every day as a way to counteract my depression, and now that it's gone, I pretty much have trouble getting out of bed every morning much less giving a fark about doing assignments or work."     For people like that those Zoom classes were like a leaky lift raft.   better than nothing , but....

Even my son who is a lner by nature and not terribly fond of some of the people in his dept, has voluntary joined groups doing "performances" (table reads) of Plays via zoom just to keep his chops up, and he genuinely seems to need the interaction, however limited.
 
2020-05-18 8:21:03 AM  

Nabb1: holdmybones: As a nursing infant, she spent her first Thanksgiving in Tallahassee, in the thick of the 2000 Florida presidential recount. As a toddler, she experienced the 9/11 attacks in Washington, D.C., and the nanny of one of her playmates was killed by the D.C. sniper that same fall. She has lived her whole life in the shadow of momentous, tumultuous events.

I hate this kind of writing. Three events that happened before she was even a school child mean she has "lived her entire life in the shadows of tumultuous events."

I used to love the Atlantic, but this is the sort of self-indulgent, supercilious, haughty nonsense that had me drop my subscription a while ago.


They had a really interesting article about how the folks who own Hobby Lobby got seriously swindled by one of the most reknowned experts on antique papyruses in the world. But about two hours into reading it I had to stop as it kept re-telling parts of the story again and again and the length of it seemed interminable
 
2020-05-18 8:22:35 AM  
I expect it's like having an un-housetrained pet: eats all your food, leaves shiat everywhere, pays for nothing.
 
2020-05-18 8:27:03 AM  

Magorn: Nabb1: holdmybones: As a nursing infant, she spent her first Thanksgiving in Tallahassee, in the thick of the 2000 Florida presidential recount. As a toddler, she experienced the 9/11 attacks in Washington, D.C., and the nanny of one of her playmates was killed by the D.C. sniper that same fall. She has lived her whole life in the shadow of momentous, tumultuous events.

I hate this kind of writing. Three events that happened before she was even a school child mean she has "lived her entire life in the shadows of tumultuous events."

I used to love the Atlantic, but this is the sort of self-indulgent, supercilious, haughty nonsense that had me drop my subscription a while ago.

They had a really interesting article about how the folks who own Hobby Lobby got seriously swindled by one of the most reknowned experts on antique papyruses in the world. But about two hours into reading it I had to stop as it kept re-telling parts of the story again and again and the length of it seemed interminable


Papyrus!!!
 
2020-05-18 8:31:00 AM  
When did kids start sharing details of their college social lives with their parents?
 
2020-05-18 8:32:19 AM  

cretinbob: Is she Are they hot?



You know there are LGBTQ and women out there that might end up stuck at home with a college student.
 
2020-05-18 8:39:26 AM  
My son is a college freshman who came for spring break and never went back aside from cleaning out his dorm. The biggest challenges have been grocery shopping (aside from coronavirus), cooking and left overs. I got used to buying less food and cooking for two. Otherwise he is an engineering student and just stayed in his room the rest of the spring finishing up his school work. Those 4am discussions with a classmate on the West Coast that would wake me up though ....

Otherwise, except for dinner, we are in our own orbits. But even dinner discussions have gotten dull -- Anything new? Nope. How about you? Nope. Thanks for the food.

As to the 2000 election he didn't care and his first birthday, just weeks after 9/11, was spent with my still stunned fellow New Yorkers. No snipers at least.
 
2020-05-18 8:50:17 AM  

damageddude: Otherwise, except for dinner, we are in our own orbits. But even dinner discussions have gotten dull -- Anything new? Nope. How about you? Nope. Thanks for the food.


That's exactly what I expected the article to say
 
2020-05-18 8:54:31 AM  

Cubs300: Magorn: Nabb1: holdmybones: As a nursing infant, she spent her first Thanksgiving in Tallahassee, in the thick of the 2000 Florida presidential recount. As a toddler, she experienced the 9/11 attacks in Washington, D.C., and the nanny of one of her playmates was killed by the D.C. sniper that same fall. She has lived her whole life in the shadow of momentous, tumultuous events.

I hate this kind of writing. Three events that happened before she was even a school child mean she has "lived her entire life in the shadows of tumultuous events."

I used to love the Atlantic, but this is the sort of self-indulgent, supercilious, haughty nonsense that had me drop my subscription a while ago.

They had a really interesting article about how the folks who own Hobby Lobby got seriously swindled by one of the most reknowned experts on antique papyruses in the world. But about two hours into reading it I had to stop as it kept re-telling parts of the story again and again and the length of it seemed interminable

Papyrus!!!


Haha
Papyrus - SNL
Youtube jVhlJNJopOQ
 
2020-05-18 9:07:11 AM  
Currently have a 18-year old who came home at Spring Break and never went back.

The sucky part of this isn't so much the distance ed but the fact he lost his job at the local resort.  He could have filled up a lot of free time with that- now he plays video games with friends and is bored a lot of the time.  He starts summer classes today just so he has something to do.  No idea what I'm going to do with my HS kid- his doc has told him not to go back to his job at McDs until things stabilize and he gets out of school in a few weeks.

At least I'm with not my nephew- he dropped out, came home and got a good job doing high-end custom cabinetry.  For about three months.  Now he doesn't have anything to do at all.
 
2020-05-18 9:21:24 AM  
Isn't there a point where you need to retire the Mommy blog? Maybe when your kids become adults.
 
2020-05-18 9:38:09 AM  
So much for my Fall Break to Dumpsgiving Advent Calendar business idea
 
2020-05-18 9:40:14 AM  

Nabb1: holdmybones: As a nursing infant, she spent her first Thanksgiving in Tallahassee, in the thick of the 2000 Florida presidential recount. As a toddler, she experienced the 9/11 attacks in Washington, D.C., and the nanny of one of her playmates was killed by the D.C. sniper that same fall. She has lived her whole life in the shadow of momentous, tumultuous events.

I hate this kind of writing. Three events that happened before she was even a school child mean she has "lived her entire life in the shadows of tumultuous events."

I used to love the Atlantic, but this is the sort of self-indulgent, supercilious, haughty nonsense that had me drop my subscription a while ago.


Not to mention that the D.C. sniper wasn't until Fall 2002.
 
2020-05-18 9:43:39 AM  

Streetwise Hercules: [Fark user image 425x318]


But it turned out those hot babes were real.
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-18 10:07:04 AM  

Nabb1: holdmybones: As a nursing infant, she spent her first Thanksgiving in Tallahassee, in the thick of the 2000 Florida presidential recount. As a toddler, she experienced the 9/11 attacks in Washington, D.C., and the nanny of one of her playmates was killed by the D.C. sniper that same fall. She has lived her whole life in the shadow of momentous, tumultuous events.

I hate this kind of writing. Three events that happened before she was even a school child mean she has "lived her entire life in the shadows of tumultuous events."

I used to love the Atlantic, but this is the sort of self-indulgent, supercilious, haughty nonsense that had me drop my subscription a while ago.


Yep. I've mostly turned to ProPublica and their associate sites for the investigative stuff and kind of scattershot for the thoughtful prose side of things.

I wish Fark had a "Long Reads" tab for long, well written pieces.
 
2020-05-18 10:25:29 AM  

Magorn: Nabb1: holdmybones: As a nursing infant, she spent her first Thanksgiving in Tallahassee, in the thick of the 2000 Florida presidential recount. As a toddler, she experienced the 9/11 attacks in Washington, D.C., and the nanny of one of her playmates was killed by the D.C. sniper that same fall. She has lived her whole life in the shadow of momentous, tumultuous events.

I hate this kind of writing. Three events that happened before she was even a school child mean she has "lived her entire life in the shadows of tumultuous events."

I used to love the Atlantic, but this is the sort of self-indulgent, supercilious, haughty nonsense that had me drop my subscription a while ago.

They had a really interesting article about how the folks who own Hobby Lobby got seriously swindled by one of the most reknowned experts on antique papyruses in the world. But about two hours into reading it I had to stop as it kept re-telling parts of the story again and again and the length of it seemed interminable


There is a fascinating book about the Joseph Smith papyrus, which he "translated" into The Pearl of Great Price, a companion to the Book of Mormon which contains the Book of Moses. Long story.

At some point in the 1960s the original papyrus fragments were discovered and given to Egyptologists, who revealed they were ordinary funerary texts. Then the Mormon official position changed so they weren't translated per se, but used to inspire divine revelation. Long story.

Anyway, this book has some great commentary, probably written by grad students, about Egyptian cosmology. Great stuff. But the main author kept shoehorning things like, "Egyptians had a water purification ritual, so they proves they practiced baptism the same way we do!" Such entertainingly erroneous conclusions. Worth reading if you are into mythology.
 
2020-05-18 10:26:02 AM  
I'm shut in with a 20 year-old college dropout, who came home for Thanksgiving break a couple of years ago and never went back.  Around MLK day I asked him when classes start up again and got "Uhhh... I left."
He's adapted very well to the quarantine, with very few changes to his routine, aside from not going to his manual labor job anymore.
 
2020-05-18 11:53:14 AM  
Just fine, if you're another college student, 18-22.
 
2020-05-18 2:36:33 PM  
Now ask again in six months when either the college student or the parents kill the other one (or murder/suicide).
 
2020-05-18 3:40:12 PM  
My daughter is a freshman who was looking forward to going away to school. She did great for the fall semester but when they shut down everything this spring she had to adjust to online classes. Unfortunately she found that hard to adjust to, especially the math class which she wound up failing. The first couple weeks were very difficult because of the total isolation but she has been able to go back to her old high school job at a local restaurant (Portillo's) and at least has been seeing some friends who are similarly isolated.

Not every student handles online coursework the same. She learns better when she can takl face to face with someone. Her study groups don't give her the same feeling of cooperation and support that she had when they actually were able to get together.

On top of everything else, her boyfriend dumped her for another girl right before spring break. Now she can't even go out on dates to try to forget him while he's dating. She keeps complaining that it feels like her whole life is on hold. Just when she was starting to feel more adult and independent she is forced back home.
 
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