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(Food.com)   Subby making Normandy pork and Dauphinoise potatoes for dinner this weekend (for the first time). LGT pork recipe. Any suggestions or best practices welcome   (food.com) divider line
    More: Misc, Apple, Vinegar, tender chunks of pork, Cider, Cooking, lovely pie filling, cut of pork, cooked apple half  
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425 clicks; posted to Food » on 15 May 2020 at 3:35 PM (10 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



16 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-05-15 3:43:28 PM  
I like a little booze in my braising liquid.  Maybe a shot of bourbon or two.
 
2020-05-15 3:54:36 PM  
I made this three times, meat dishes are out of favor due to two vegan daughters and a wife who hates pork.  The first was the best.  It is a quarantine so ingredients are hard to come by but a chef friend explained why the first time was the best.  Creme fraiche is far better  than sour cream, it has a fat content of 30% compared to sour cream at 20%. The fat is integral to the flavor.  Second, if you use fresh thyme still add a teaspoon of the dried thyme, the fresh is aromatic, the dried ground is flavorful.  Third I used honeycrisp apples, this was what she thought really made the difference.  Also her rule is always use French butter, due to the higher fat content.  Also keep in mind the pork shrinks a lot.

I hope it goes well, I miss eating stuff like this, but it is a lot of food for one person and the recipe didn't reduce very well.
 
2020-05-15 4:04:00 PM  
Dolphinnose potatoes? I've never heard of such a thing.
 
2020-05-15 4:06:57 PM  
Drink a white wine or a cider with that.
 
2020-05-15 4:13:22 PM  

FrancoFile: Drink a white wine or a cider with that.


And calvados with dessert
 
2020-05-15 4:18:33 PM  

Ambivalence: Dolphinnose potatoes? I've never heard of such a thing.


Subby probably did it on porpoise
 
2020-05-15 4:30:15 PM  
I assume you're already using a mandolin to slice the spuds. I use cream instead of milk and parmesan instead of gruyere. Fattening but fun.
 
2020-05-15 4:31:30 PM  
*Mandoline
 
2020-05-15 4:36:33 PM  

johnny_vegas: Ambivalence: Dolphinnose potatoes? I've never heard of such a thing.

Subby probably did it on porpoise


I see my work here is done.
 
2020-05-15 4:45:01 PM  

FrancoFile: Drink a white wine or a cider with that.


Actually, I'd suggest something like a porter or doppelbock to pair with the apples. But that's me. It's already got Calvados in the mix, and apples in with the pork, so I'd think something with a slight bit of hops, and able to stand up to the sweet.

Dauphinoise potatoes, you don't want to skimp on the nutmeg, but don't go nuts. It's a counter-balance to the cheese, and it's an accent note, not a full flavoring. Think like a bit of nutmeg tossed in with your garlic before you wilt spinach. Too little, and you don't get the effect, too much, and people are looking at their taters in a quizzical fashion. It's just scalloped potatoes, so don't get intimidated by 'em.

The recipe hit on the important part: browning BEFORE it goes into the crockpot. That bit of sear, and the caramelization for the shallots, and the reduction of balsamic with your shallots. Balsamic turns to magic when it reduces, becoming amazingly sweet and the tart mellows--although, if you get a good whiff as it reduces, it's an eye-opener. A balsamic reduction can be used for strawberries and can seriously turn your strawberry shortcake up a few notches. Especially if you fiddle with the whipped cream with a touch of your favorite liquor. This dish  is something you DON'T want to reduce down that much, but you want to concentrate those flavors BEFORE they hit other ingredients.

What are you doing for vegetables, or are you sticking to a side salad? It's maybe late, but roasted golden beets, and just sliced through to almost the top will give you a nice fan, and a drizzle of an apple-cider vinaigrette might be a nice offset. Heck, you could even serve them at room temp, and make them a very pretty edible garnish.

If you have asparagus in, that might be nice as well, with a fast hollandaise you can whip up while you pull your potatoes together.
 
2020-05-15 6:08:58 PM  
The first thing you want to do is lay down some artillery fire. When the pork reaches the beach, stop the artillery and hope the pork can make it to the barrier wall before getting shot.
 
2020-05-15 6:34:14 PM  
Dauphinois potatoes are awesome. But they are rich. Small portions recommended.
 
2020-05-15 7:03:00 PM  

hubiestubert: FrancoFile: Drink a white wine or a cider with that.

Actually, I'd suggest something like a porter or doppelbock to pair with the apples. But that's me. It's already got Calvados in the mix, and apples in with the pork, so I'd think something with a slight bit of hops, and able to stand up to the sweet.

Dauphinoise potatoes, you don't want to skimp on the nutmeg, but don't go nuts. It's a counter-balance to the cheese, and it's an accent note, not a full flavoring. Think like a bit of nutmeg tossed in with your garlic before you wilt spinach. Too little, and you don't get the effect, too much, and people are looking at their taters in a quizzical fashion. It's just scalloped potatoes, so don't get intimidated by 'em.

The recipe hit on the important part: browning BEFORE it goes into the crockpot. That bit of sear, and the caramelization for the shallots, and the reduction of balsamic with your shallots. Balsamic turns to magic when it reduces, becoming amazingly sweet and the tart mellows--although, if you get a good whiff as it reduces, it's an eye-opener. A balsamic reduction can be used for strawberries and can seriously turn your strawberry shortcake up a few notches. Especially if you fiddle with the whipped cream with a touch of your favorite liquor. This dish  is something you DON'T want to reduce down that much, but you want to concentrate those flavors BEFORE they hit other ingredients.

What are you doing for vegetables, or are you sticking to a side salad? It's maybe late, but roasted golden beets, and just sliced through to almost the top will give you a nice fan, and a drizzle of an apple-cider vinaigrette might be a nice offset. Heck, you could even serve them at room temp, and make them a very pretty edible garnish.

If you have asparagus in, that might be nice as well, with a fast hollandaise you can whip up while you pull your potatoes together.


Thanks!  Sticking with side salad this time around since I am a little concerned about timing and the richness of both dishes.  Hollandaise sounds like a great idea for me to tackle next week!
 
2020-05-15 8:46:40 PM  
...3 lbs pork shoulder...

...Cut into large cubes of about 4" square or even bigger - it shrinks with cooking & works better with larger pieces of meat.


Does this sort of thing stick out to anybody else?  I keep wondering where the hell cooks get their rulers, because they so often specify completely unrealistic sizes for cutting things.  You could cut a 3 lb pork shoulder into... one of those cubes, with some trimmings left over, because a four-inch cube of meat weighs around two pounds.  Yet that 3 lb shoulder is supposed to generate enough of them to provide each of your 8-10 dinner guests with two or three cubes.  Taking the middle of that distribution, you need 24 pieces of meat, about 2 ounces per cube if you ignore trimming loss, and you get cubes of around 1.5 inches.  Where the fark did 4" come from?

But I keep seeing this in recipes.  "Cut chicken into 2-inch cubes" (photo at top of recipe shows 3/4-inch cubes). "Slice sausage into 1-inch pieces" (photo shows 3/8 to 1/2-inch slices).  Do cooking schools distribute dick-inch rulers or something?  Does somebody convert all of these from metric, but just replace "cm" with "inch?"
 
2020-05-16 1:49:28 AM  

Professor Science: ...3 lbs pork shoulder...

...Cut into large cubes of about 4" square or even bigger - it shrinks with cooking & works better with larger pieces of meat.

Does this sort of thing stick out to anybody else?  I keep wondering where the hell cooks get their rulers, because they so often specify completely unrealistic sizes for cutting things.  You could cut a 3 lb pork shoulder into... one of those cubes, with some trimmings left over, because a four-inch cube of meat weighs around two pounds.  Yet that 3 lb shoulder is supposed to generate enough of them to provide each of your 8-10 dinner guests with two or three cubes.  Taking the middle of that distribution, you need 24 pieces of meat, about 2 ounces per cube if you ignore trimming loss, and you get cubes of around 1.5 inches.  Where the fark did 4" come from?

But I keep seeing this in recipes.  "Cut chicken into 2-inch cubes" (photo at top of recipe shows 3/4-inch cubes). "Slice sausage into 1-inch pieces" (photo shows 3/8 to 1/2-inch slices).  Do cooking schools distribute dick-inch rulers or something?  Does somebody convert all of these from metric, but just replace "cm" with "inch?"


This makes a bunch more sense if you assume the nonsensical inch dimensions should have been in centimeters.
 
2020-05-16 10:49:36 AM  
You saved the fat from the last time you made duck breast, right?

In that case, swap out the Dauphinoise potatoes for Sarladaise potatoes. Trust me... I live in Sarlat.
 
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