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(Fark)   Another farker shares their personal experience with COVID-19. TL;DR? Please remember you can have it and not feel very sick   (fark.com) divider line
    More: CSB, Cough, Antibody, ELISA, Common cold, Asthma, Cinco de Mayo, HIV test, mild chest congestion  
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2253 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 May 2020 at 10:03 PM (13 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-05-07 6:43:10 PM  
I'm writing this because the severe cases of COVID-19 are getting all the media attention, and because scared people have a tendency to overgeneralize. I want all of you farkers to know that you can be contagious with COVID-19 without feeling like you have the worst flu ever and you're dying. This is my experience.
At the beginning of March, after some discussion and checking the COVID-19 numbers where we lived, we decided to go to Wild West Steampunk Con 9 at Old Tucson Studios. I had entered a short story competition and had to be there on the last day to see if I won. We also handed out free stickers and asked people to read my web serial, which is steampunky. We only went for the last day (it was expensive and we couldn't afford more than a day anyway), and I didn't win but they gave me a coffee mug for participating. There were no confirmed cases in Pima County at the time, and only a few up by Phoenix. Minutes after we returned home that evening, we got an alert on our phones that the first case had been confirmed on the outskirts of Pima County.

Only after I woke up feeling sniffly with some mild chest congestion the next morning did I find out Arizona was (barring a few high-risk exceptions) not testing anyone who couldn't prove they'd been in contact with someone else who tested positive. Okay. So I felt only a little sick and it was probably my allergies because I'd been outside most of the day and it was spring, and I couldn't get a test even if I wanted one. The chest congestion was the only odd thing, I don't usually get that with my allergies.

So I started a clock. COVID-19 seems to have a maximum 14 day incubation period, and if I didn't get some more definite symptoms by then, I was probably okay. The linked article is not the one I read, but the information was similar. The upshot is that none of the symptoms appear in 100% of the cases. Up to 18% of mild cases won't even get a fever. What doctors must look for is clusters of symptoms, and then they need a test to confirm. (Likely multiple tests, because they were rushed out and are not as accurate as they should be.)

Unfortunately, while this clock was ticking and I was waiting for more symptoms, I also needed to gear up for a pandemic that was already affecting the supply chain. I didn't know what the stores were going to look like in two weeks, or society itself. I was getting constant, and sometimes conflicting, information about what to do to keep myself safe - and I was worried because my S/O is asthmatic and diabetic, and I didn't want to give it to him. We live in a studio apartment, so there is no way to put me in a separate room like the CDC recommends. We discussed putting him in a hotel, but we couldn't afford to do that when I might just be having allergies. If we did that now without being sure, we wouldn't have the money to do that later if we needed it for sure. This was also the situation we were in with the "pandemic leave" the county allotted him for his job - it was a total of 14 days paid leave, and if you used it you had to use all of it at once. (This has since been revised.)

We did our best. He told people at his office I might be sick, and so he might be sick, but he didn't feel sick so he was probably okay. I tried to limit contact with people, but I also had laundry to do and prescriptions to pick up and we needed groceries. I figured out how to do grocery pickup and limit contact even more, but I couldn't do prescriptions that way, and when I picked up my grocery order, they were entirely out of soap and disinfectant. I could either gear up for a pandemic with no soap or go into another store looking for it. So I went into a store. This was before the CDC were recommending everyone wear a mask. I know I sneezed unmasked in a Fry's pharmacy and at a Walmart during those 13 days when I thought I probably had allergies. I don't think I coughed or sneezed in the laundry room, but the droplets that transfer COVID-19 may also be produced by talking or just breathing. Despite taking what seemed like reasonable precautions at the time, we may have hurt a lot of people.

On day 13, I felt feverish. We checked me with the thermometer and it read 98.1. That seemed a little odd because that was what it told me my temperature was days ago, and I usually run about 97.5. My S/O took his temperature and it also came back 98.1. Then we just ran the thing in the air and it told us 98.1. The thermometer was broken. My S/O went to the grocery store and two pharmacies (unmasked, but he wasn't feeling sick and that was the guideline at the time) and there were no thermometers. All the thermometers on Amazon were out of stock for at least two weeks. So all we could do was have him feel me and guess. He thought I felt hot.

We did the telemedicine. His office had recently implemented it. They got back to us so fast that we actually missed the first call. I described my symptoms and my situation - no thermometer, but seem to be running a fever after 13 days of sniffles, soreness and light chest congestion with occasional dry cough. Yes, my poo is a bit runny. They told me I needed to isolate and I needed a test. They said they had notified my county government and they would be in contact for where I could get tested.

Nobody ever got back to me. I checked the county website and the criteria for testing had not changed, and I did not meet those criteria - I was not in a high risk profession or housing situation and I had not been in contact with someone who tested positive. The only thing I can do now to find out if I had it is antibody testing, which will take some time to become available and may or may not be accurate.

I may not have had it, but the mild symptoms I described over the phone were enough that the doctor thought I needed a test. Because most people who have COVID-19 will only have mild symptoms. My S/O, who was boxed up in a studio apartment with me the whole time (his office let him work from home as soon as he told them I had a fever, but not before that) and sleeping next to me never felt sick at all. We need to wait on antibody testing for him too, but it is highly unlikely that I got sick and he didn't, he just never felt sick. And that's despite being in a high risk group.

My symptoms: Fever, loose stool, soreness, tiredness, loss of taste (except for sweet things and spicy), mild chest congestion, intermittent dry cough and pain with breathing, general spacey feeling and dumber than usual. That's it. It never got worse than a mild flu, like when you get it and you know your vaccine just barely missed that particular strain. I did not need to go to the hospital. I did not get blue lips or fingernails. I was scared it was going to get worse, especially as I started getting better and entered the territory for a cytokine storm, but it never happened.

I took Tylenol for the fever (Ibuprofin might damage your immune response, but we're pretty sure it doesn't), and cough medicine didn't help the cough so I didn't bother. I stayed away from people until three days after I stopped spiking a fever in the evening (That's another thing, your fever may only be in the evenings, and some people never get one at all!). I was probably contagious for about a month, and half of the time I didn't know it. God only knows about my S/O, he might've picked it up at the same time as me or later on from me or maybe (miraculously) not at all, but at least he's still working from home.

I won't know if I had it for sure until I get an antibody test - those are just now becoming widely available in my state, and it's still possible to get a false negative. I don't know if having antibodies means I would be immune, or for how long. We don't have the data on that yet.

I'm 39 years old, female, fat, I need a CPAP at night because I stop breathing, I have chronic pain and ongoing health issues, I'm a high-functioning autistic and I live in a red state. My experience will not be yours. The point is, you may not feel even as sick as I did, but you can still be contagious and hurt people. You can follow current guidelines to the letter and still hurt people, because we're learning more about this disease all the time. It's a new disease. That's what "novel coronavirus" means.

I'm asking you to be careful. Limit human contact. Wear a mask. The main vector for this disease (so far as we know now) is droplets that you put into the air via your nose and mouth. They are heavy. They stay where you leave them in the air, where they can be inhaled by others, and then fall onto surfaces, where you can pick them up on your hands and carry them to your nose, eyes and mouth. This version of coronavirus doesn't (seem to!!) survive surface-to-surface transfer very well - inhaling it is the most likely way to get sick, followed by touching a surface where some droplets fell and then touching your face. Washing your hands and not touching your face (or trying not to, because that's darn near impossible) is to protect you from a secondary method of infection. Wearing a mask is to protect everyone from the primary means of infection. And that's just based on what we know right now! A lot has changed since I got sick two months ago.

My S/O and I will probably be able to get antibody tests sometime this month, and I'll try to let FARK know if we really did have it. Even if we didn't, most people who get sick will not feel very sick. We have the data, we have a pretty good idea what this pandemic looks like and a doctor will tell you to get tested even if your symptoms are mild, but only the worst cases get attention. "Fat lady feels kinda crummy, shouldn't have tried to advertise at a steampunk convention on the eve of a pandemic, may have killed multiple grandparents by sneezing in a Walmart" doesn't make for a good headline.

(Typos that look like words are the bane of my existence. Please be patient. You can probably figure out what I meant to say.)
 
2020-05-07 7:06:28 PM  
Glad you're ok 'Lurk!

Your case highlights *why* we need large scale, randomly sampled mandatory testing - not everyone gets sick, and even those who get sick may attribute it to allergies or last night's jalapeno poppers and in the meantime they are spreading the disease to others who may become very, very ill.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2020-05-07 7:25:09 PM  
The evidence suggests, but does not prove, that most people who are infected don't notice anything out of the ordinary.  Going to the ICU is as likely as rolling a natural 3 on 3d6 for your constitution.  If those antibody surveys are accurate.

I heard an interview with a scientist working on the common cold coronaviruses.  The low end of cold severity blends seamlessly into the high end of everyday non-virus related nose irritation.
 
2020-05-07 7:31:58 PM  
Glad to hear you're doing well.  And sorry you got it here in Tucson...yeah, I remember the day the first case was announced here.  Up till then a lot of people around here were trying to convince themselves that Tucson was going to be spared.

I just wonder how many, if any, people got it during the giant Rock and Mineral Show a couple weeks before.
 
2020-05-07 7:32:23 PM  

OptionC: Glad you're ok 'Lurk!

Your case highlights *why* we need large scale, randomly sampled mandatory testing - not everyone gets sick, and even those who get sick may attribute it to allergies or last night's jalapeno poppers and in the meantime they are spreading the disease to others who may become very, very ill.


Exactly so. I would have gotten tested right away if I could have, but my state was rationing them so severely I couldn't. If I had a positive result right away, I would've isolated or at least worn a bandanna if I absolutely had to go buy disinfectant. We both would have.

We still can't get masks in stores here. We're using the CDC's coffee-filter-in-a-bandanna version. For normal use - that's if you don't know your N95 size and have a recent fitting test - a paper surgical mask cuts down on your droplet spray the most. No mask will prevent 100% of droplets from escaping, but even a homemade mask is better than nothing.
 
2020-05-07 7:49:38 PM  
Glad you're feeling better!
We have to go get supplies (it's been 3 weeks) so we're masking up.  Good times.
 
2020-05-07 8:50:07 PM  
Always interesting to hear first-hand stories like this. And masking up in public is the right thing to do.

Unfortunately, for a lot of people living in Trumpistan, masks are political statements. Some people still don't realize that masks don't protect you. They protect everybody else, if you happen to be infected without symptoms. And they appear to actually work. They are not a symbol of the deep state trying to take away your freedom to do whatever you want.

So don't get stuck on stupid over politics. Wear a mask.
 
2020-05-07 9:06:32 PM  
Okay, well here's my "weird illness that might have been COVID-19 that I can't easily explain away and could not get tested for if I wanted to" experience.  For the record before anyone asks, I am 41, male, ~195lbs (at the start of this), 6' tall, blood pressure normal (110/70 to 120/180), no known underlying physical health issues, and no known allergies.

~March 16, work (school) gets shut down, but I have to go into work and deal with a ton of stuff that I shouldn't have had to, stressed out about it, freaked out about everything.  Go to work in work in gloves and a mask.  Go home and have the runs (pretty much all liquid).  Figure it's due to being freaked out about everything, because I've previously had a diagnosis long ago of Panic Disorder and anxiety levels are through the roof.

Following ~seven days: Gut sounds like a cross between a mad scientist lab and the Bog of Eternal Stench from Labyrinth.  Anything I eat pretty much results in a visit to the toilet within 30 minutes as if it's either running straight through or pushing something right out. At this point I start getting concerned, because I can't put a week of this down to anxiety issues caused by the reports in the media that make it sound like you get it and you're gonna get really sick and drop dead.  Also can't put it down to sudden change of diet, because while I'm now eating homemade food and less fast food/grab and go food, this can't be something that persists for over a week.  It's just weird.

Then my eyes started getting itchy/burning and crudding up more late into the week.  Now, in accordance to the DON'T TOUCH YOUR EFFING FACE rules, I had been wiping my eyes with tissues, maybe this irritated them?  But my eyes themselves aren't red/pinkeye.  Weird.

Next week, not eating a lot, put this down to not doing a lot, mainly sleeping or laying down watching TV or poking at the same stuff on my phone.  I didn't sleep 18 hours a day, but it was like 12.  Also have to go into work a few times during this period, went in with a mask and gloves on (was working alone and staying away from the few people I did encounter).  Kinda felt sometimes like chest was tight or throat/lungs were weird, but also can't NOT say that was due to anxiety and hypochondria and wearing a mask that's holding in moisture, plus I get tonsil stones and those also make my throat weird from time to time.  Poop situation is still loose stools.  Notice I'm not eating much and have to make an effort to really eat, my gut, despite the noises, isn't sending me any signals of "I'm empty put food in me".

Throughout these two weeks I'm taking my temp and I'm between my baseline of 97.7 and around 98.4, and when I feel warm it's because it's either above 72 in my apartment or my temp's spiked due to something like a hot shower or having been working with an unzipped coat and a hat on or some other physical exertion.  Highest I spike is to 99.5 which goes right back down once I lie down and cool off.

Talk to a co-worker, he reports he's got gut issues and the burning eyes.  Okay now I'm concerned.  The stories start coming out about diarrhea being a symptom and 25% of cases report GI problems and nothing else, and also pinkeye being another thing being seen in COVID-19 cases.  Well, I don't have a PCP and even if I did there is no testing because all testing is restricted solely to first responders and "cases where a diagnosis would change the outcome of treatment" and I'm not showing the only three symptoms the CDC and anyone else care about (fever, cough, shortness of breath).  Okay, I just keep monitoring temp, eating what I can, drinking a lot of water.  I have some muscle aches and headaches, again, not symptoms officially on the list, and I can't not put them down to laying down propped up on my elbows or laying in one spot too long watching TV or whatever.  Nothing overly painful and nothing that I feel like taking painkillers for.  Another coworker reports he and family are ill, but his wife's a nurse.  She has all the symptoms except a fever over 100 degrees, and they won't test her because she doesn't have a fever, WTF?!

Week 3: Keep monitoring temperature, focus on eating and trying not to hypochondriac out too much.  Notice what may be a tiny bit of shortness of breath as if I can't get *quite* as deep a breath as normal, based on how long a deep breath takes me to inhale and exhale fully.  Poop situation is still mostly loose, but appetite is coming back up slowly.  Temperature still in the normal range for me, every time I feel warm I check the thermostat to see what the ambient temp is and then take my temp and I'm just running a bit warm or feeling warm because I'm still in winter mode and the temp is up to 75-78, I guess.  Eyes stop their itchy burning thing.

Week 4: Step on the scale and discovered I've lost between 15-20 pounds.  But in the good news department, appetite starts coming back (I actually feel hungry), but my gut is still making Bog of Eternal Stench chemical factory noises a lot.  Poop finally really starts getting back to normal.  Temperature still remains in the same range.  Finally start feeling a lot less anxious about things and get some energy back.

Week 5, mostly back to normal, still down in weight (and I would like to keep it off!), gut is now mostly quiet instead of gurgling and poop is mostly normal.  Sometimes though it's still like something that I ate is irritating my gut and wants to speed out.

So my guess is that this was my run-in with COVID-19.  Given the purported numbers of "asymptomatic" cases, cases that present without fever, cases with GI distress/diarrhea, and so on, I figure I might as well share this in case someone goes "oh yeah, I never thought that having a month of gut issues and a weird spell of burning eyes and loss of appetite/gut gurgling and growling like mad might be COVID-19."

Sister who lives with me says she never really felt ill, though she seemed sniffly and tired at times, but again, things that one would just overlook as stress/anxiety/being tired, and forgive me for saying this, but PMS/female problems (we talked about this masking symptoms and how it can't be ruled out, before anyone starts in on me about misogyny or whatever).

I'm still on six weeks later having my gut sometimes not like what I eat, I figure if anything it was rather inflamed from COVID-19 and has decided to be a bit sensitive to certain things that normally never gave me trouble, like spicier foods (which I avoided during the original month).  I can definitely tell that I lost 15 pounds around the waist though.  And before anyone asks, no, there was no bloody stool or consistent change in color or anything other than to reflect what I had been eating, so no signs of some other problem other than just the kind of irritation/inflammation apparently seen with COVID-19.

I would tell everyone that if you start having weird gut trouble and it persists, don't put it down to food poisoning or a bad meal or a stomach bug, start checking your temp and yourself for signs of shortness of breath or lack of oxygen or any other things they've since noticed seem to be symptoms of COVID-19.  If your gut's upset for a week and Pepto/Kaopectaid/whatever isn't helping, you should start thinking about consulting a doctor.  Especially if you feel off or you're not eating normally or you're sleeping a lot.

Also, for the record, my job is IT repair, so I get to touch lots of keyboards/Chromebooks/laptops, blow the dust out of things, poke at touch screen control panels, and generally get to go everywhere between schools and administrative offices, so if Patient Zero coughs on their keyboard or sneezes into their hand and then puts it on their mouse/trackpad, I'm likely to pick up whatever AND carry it all around the rest of the district.

(and of course IT is essential because we have to deploy devices to everyone for work-from-home and swap them out when they break or when their kids/pets break them as well.  Healthcare, first responders, and retail/food employees get all the acknowledgements but the people who travel around and fix their stuff are overlooked both for their hard work and the fact that in this day and age one guy may be a contract employee for an outfit that services multiple accounts and who gets to go fix stuff in a hospital one day and a McDonalds and a Kroger the next and could be spreading the bug all around.)

Supposedly there's some availability of antibody testing now around here but recent news is that accuracy (specificity and sensitivity) vary widely among tests.  So even if I were to get tested for antibodies, who knows if the test itself is any good?  I'm going to inquire soon about who has what kind of tests available and see if I can take one though.
 
2020-05-07 9:10:10 PM  
This basically mirrors my own experience. I live in Chicago, take the train to and from work (or, I did) and on March 12th I began experiencing severe chills and had a cough for a few days by that time. On the 13th, I was unable to go in to the office. Over the next week, I never got what anyone would call a fever, but my normal body temp ranges around 96.4-5, so when I'm hitting 99 I'm personally burning up, which I was, and I topped out at 101. Dry cough that wouldn't stop, I got winded doing the dishes, didn't want to eat, could barely think. That's not an exaggeration, either, I literally had to stop and sit down in the middle of washing dishes on more than one occasion. Did a teleconference with my doctor, and he told me to assume I had it, stay away from the ER unless I couldn't breathe at all, and good luck because I couldn't get a test because I couldn't confirm I had been in contact with someone who had it - which isn't QUITE  a true Catch-22, but I'm sure Joseph Heller would appreciate it.

It's now May 7th, and I still have a lingering dry cough and can only barely do any routine on my exercise bike before I'm ready to collapse. Almost 2 months, I'm barely functional when I was very active right before.
 
2020-05-07 9:21:56 PM  
DoBeDoBeLurk, take care. thanks for sharing, I hope you and your SO live a long and happy life.
 
2020-05-07 9:48:26 PM  
DoBeDoBeLurk, thanks for sharing (and also null and naughtyrev and anyone else with experience to share, including Znuh who told his very frightening story the other day).  Glad you did not get the nightmare version of this virus and it is a good reminder that many people will survive it without being in grave danger, but we just don't know which of us that will be.  I saw the story about people having COVID-19 parties to get the virus and "get it over with"--what the ever-lovin' fark are they thinking?

Anyhow, good that you are on the mend and thanks for reiterating the mask message!
 
2020-05-07 10:17:56 PM  
2nd week March, horrible sinus infection with fever, chills, and a total loss of sense of smell and most taste. Couple days of really watery runs, Maybe a minor cough. Symptoms lasted about a week or so, except the anosmia, about a month of bland life until I could finally sense the rose I stuck my nose in.

So darned if I know if I had it, or some other thang.  Well, there'll be antibody tests available, continue to shelter until then.
 
2020-05-07 10:20:15 PM  
So many stories are like yours: people who assume they had it but couldn't get tested. The numbers are so much higher than what is being reported.
 
2020-05-07 10:23:38 PM  
My sister-in-law in Arizona had a horrible span of time in early March. 104 fever. We suspect that it was COVID-19 but despite the fever nobody tested her. Flu? Yes, a test. (Negative for flu). She lives with her family that includes a young child.  Nobody else in the house got sick.

So, maybe everyone there was exposed to COVID-19 and only one showed any symptoms. And hers were terrible.

What a weird disease.
 
2020-05-07 10:23:46 PM  

ZAZ: The evidence suggests, but does not prove, that most people who are infected don't notice anything out of the ordinary.  Going to the ICU is as likely as rolling a natural 3 on 3d6 for your constitution.  If those antibody surveys are accurate.

I heard an interview with a scientist working on the common cold coronaviruses.  The low end of cold severity blends seamlessly into the high end of everyday non-virus related nose irritation.


The antibody tests have a very high false positive rate. It's going to take a while to get the shiatty ones off the market now that the FDA is finally going to regulate them.
 
2020-05-07 10:30:21 PM  
I was unable to sleep 2 nights ago, trouble breathing. I am 55 so this was not something utterly surprising.

I was able to have my oxygen blood level checked the next day, 93 which is not all that bad a score (you want 95-98, below 90 is a mild concern.)

Continued pain in the small of my back, tightness in my chest. Difficulty getting a "satisfying breath" at times.

No headaches or fever, but I am typing this from bed due to fatigue.

Thank you lurk, for your post.
 
2020-05-07 10:31:49 PM  
A very useful second data point. I know I have had all of the symptoms of mild Coronavirus intermittantly for the last few months, but can't tell them from my regular ongoing symptoms of various health issues that have been with me for years or for most of my life. Until I can be tested by a reliable test (or rather, series of tests), I will never know a) if I had it; b) if I will get it; c) if it will be mild; d) if it will be life-threatening or progress to fatality and pre-mature death.

I can only stay home, try to stay safe, practice making masks until I get the materials and the methods right, and hopefully wait this out until there is a cure, a vaccine or sufficient testing to satisfy my doubts.

Slowly things are getting clearer and better and I am sure that most of the world will weather this crisis. It might be the Next Spanish Flu, but is almost certainly the next SARS or MERS (hence the official official name SARS-Covid-2.)

Everybody needs to learn more about probablity, chance, logic, fact-based reasoning, and tolerance. All the lessons that Covid has been teaching are old ones: things we could have done at any time in the last 60 years or more. Things we know we should do, that a lucky and wise few have been preaching and practicing for a very long time, but which people really only internalize when the situation is existential and threatening to life, livelihoods and systems and institutions as well as values and sentiments.
 
2020-05-07 10:33:03 PM  
I like how articulate, coherent, and open people are on this site when they share their covid stories. And factual and non hysterical. It's almost as if they want to give us useful information instead of spreading hysteria.

Dallymo, thanks for listing the various covid writers (oh! Time for a  collection of medical fark stories?)

Nul, znuh, DoBeDoBeLurk, naughtyrev and others - thanks for sharing and a speedy and full recovery to you all.  Everyone else - good luck.
 
2020-05-07 10:33:38 PM  
Hope You're Feeling Better ~ Santana
Youtube P_vJBz2_LtE
 
2020-05-07 10:35:49 PM  

DoBeDoBeLurk: I'm writing this because the severe cases of COVID-19 are getting all the media attention, and because scared people have a tendency to overgeneralize. I want all of you farkers to know that you can be contagious with COVID-19 without feeling like you have the worst flu ever and you're dying. This is my experience.
....
My S/O and I will probably be able to get antibody tests sometime this month, and I'll try to let FARK know if we really did have it. Even if we didn't, most people who get sick will not feel very sick. We have the data, we have a pretty good idea what this pandemic looks like and a doctor will tell you to get tested even if your symptoms are mild, but only the worst cases get attention. "Fat lady feels kinda crummy, shouldn't have tried to advertise at a steampunk convention on the eve of a pandemic, may have killed multiple grandparents by sneezing in a Walmart" doesn't make for a good headline.


So the upshot is, you had some symptoms that may or may not have been caused by COVID-19, and you still don't know. Until you find out, I don't see how your story is particularly useful?


That said, here's my story:

I am 62, male, not overweight and in good health. Back on Saturday, February 1 I started not feeling well, just a hint. By Monday it felt like I was coughing up glass and I had a fever. I thought it might be strep throat? I usually just ride things out but on Tuesday I felt so bad I went to the doctor. He prescribed some antibiotics and steroids and by midweek I was feeling pretty good. But the following week I started feeling worse again and by Friday the 14th I messaged my doc and he prescribed a stronger antibiotic. Over the weekend I had fever, cough, no runny nose or sneezing, and very shallow breathing, so shallow I thought I might have to go to the hospital. These were exactly the symptoms described by the CDC for COVID-19. I was sleeping in another room and my wife would come to me in the night and listen to see if I was still breathing. I was, but just barely, and it did not have the "rattling" sound associated with pneumonia. It's like only the very upper part of my lungs were moving. She was scared.

By Monday the 17th though I started to breathe just a little easier. By the end of the week I felt pretty normal but still weak. Even six weeks later I still had a little leftover cough. Did I have COVID-19? I messaged my doctor to ask and he said that my symptoms overlapped so many other ailments that there was no way to know without a test, and they were so scarce that they weren't going to use one on someone who no longer presented symptoms. If I did have it was I still contagious? Nobody really seems to know how long the transmission period is, before symptoms and after.

Luckily I am retired and there isn't anyplace I have to go or anything I have to do.

Our next door neighbor is an ER doc. About a week ago she and my wife were talking and the topic of plasma donation and testing for antibodies came up. My wife told her about how I was sick the first few weeks in February with symptoms that were a match for COVID-19, and our neighbor was eager for me to get tested and see if I could donate.

I messaged my doctor again and he said that antibody tests were now available. I went in and had some blood taken and they sent it to the main lab in Tulsa. Later that day it came back negative so I guess I didn't have it after all, assuming that the test is accurate. The results did note that the test is not yet FDA approved so there is still an element of uncertainty. My wife is still not convinced that I did not have it.
 
2020-05-07 10:36:19 PM  

claudius: I like how articulate, coherent, and open people are on this site when they share their covid stories. And factual and non hysterical. It's almost as if they want to give us useful information instead of spreading hysteria.

Dallymo, thanks for listing the various covid writers (oh! Time for a  collection of medical fark stories?)

Nul, znuh, DoBeDoBeLurk, naughtyrev and others - thanks for sharing and a speedy and full recovery to you all.  Everyone else - good luck.


I'm not saying I had it or didn't have it, but on the balance of the evidence without getting tested, it seems to me that I had it, and that at least if your gut has been acting up for a week, reach out for medical evaluation so you're prepared if things go sideways.
 
2020-05-07 10:37:30 PM  

DoBeDoBeLurk: I'm writing this because the severe cases of COVID-19 are getting all the media attention, and because scared people have a tendency to overgeneralize. I want all of you farkers to know that you can be contagious with COVID-19 without feeling like you have the worst flu ever and you're dying. This is my experience.
At the beginning of March, after some discussion and checking the COVID-19 numbers where we lived, we decided to go to Wild West Steampunk Con 9 at Old Tucson Studios. I had entered a short story competition and had to be there on the last day to see if I won. We also handed out free stickers and asked people to read my web serial, which is steampunky. We only went for the last day (it was expensive and we couldn't afford more than a day anyway), and I didn't win but they gave me a coffee mug for participating. There were no confirmed cases in Pima County at the time, and only a few up by Phoenix. Minutes after we returned home that evening, we got an alert on our phones that the first case had been confirmed on the outskirts of Pima County.

Only after I woke up feeling sniffly with some mild chest congestion the next morning did I find out Arizona was (barring a few high-risk exceptions) not testing anyone who couldn't prove they'd been in contact with someone else who tested positive. Okay. So I felt only a little sick and it was probably my allergies because I'd been outside most of the day and it was spring, and I couldn't get a test even if I wanted one. The chest congestion was the only odd thing, I don't usually get that with my allergies.

So I started a clock. COVID-19 seems to have a maximum 14 day incubation period, and if I didn't get some more definite symptoms by then, I was probably okay. The linked article is not the one I read, but the information was similar. The upshot is that none of the symptoms appear in 100% of the cases. Up to 18% of mild cases won't even get a fever. What doctors must look for is clusters of symptoms, and then th ...


My girlfriend and I went through it. She got sent home sick on April 9th, from a major grocery chain here in Texas that she works at as a manager. The PPE they ordered that was supposed to get there at the beginning of March was confiscated by the Feds, and they weren't able to source anymore until April, right before she and I got sick. She had it worse than I did, by Sunday the 12th I was ready to take her to the hospital..we got a hold of her doctor, he gave us some parameters to go by and go in if they got worse. We were able to get a test that Sunday morning through her work. I was not able to get one. It's not a fun test, nor is it very accurate at all. You'd probably have to get 3 or 4 of them to get a definite answer. She got better that night, we got the test results on the following Tuesday. "Inconclusive". They asked her if she wanted another one and she declined. We rode it out. Fever, chills and sweats, nausea, diarrhea, nausea, mental confusion, muscle and joint aches, the feeling it is probing your body looking for weakness...I haven't ever been sick like that before. 4 weeks later and I am just starting to feel somewhat normal. I still have a pallor to my face, and I dropped about 10 pounds that I didn't have to lose. I don't ever want to go through that again. If a reliable antibody test comes out, I'll get it, but I just wonder if I'll ever know. Pretty farking sure though. Don't be an asshole.
 
2020-05-07 10:39:10 PM  

todangst: I was unable to sleep 2 nights ago, trouble breathing. I am 55 so this was not something utterly surprising.

I was able to have my oxygen blood level checked the next day, 93 which is not all that bad a score (you want 95-98, below 90 is a mild concern.)

Continued pain in the small of my back, tightness in my chest. Difficulty getting a "satisfying breath" at times.

No headaches or fever, but I am typing this from bed due to fatigue.

Thank you lurk, for your post.


Same symptoms are frequent with me. I do have a pulsometer but don't trust it with every reading. My pulse rate has been way high, then way low on the next reading, so I have to take many readings to get a clear picture of my COPD, asthma, atrial afibulation, etc. I have weathered a couple of scary days lately, and have skipped my CPAP machine when just too tired and sore. My pulse is back to my normal today. Yesterday when I tried to jog home, I had a hard time catching my breath and experience aches on both sides (lung-related, not purely muscular from running). But who knows what is what? It's a tricky virus with many avatars. It is necesssary to be attentive.

I don't recommend pulseometers for the totally healthy, but my parents were ill in 2016 and my Father has since died of many problems, some not properly diagnosed but possibly hereditary, so I got one and take my blood pressure with one of my two machines for a second opinion and better information. If you think a pulsimeter would help you to understand ambiguous symptoms, you can probably get one for abour $49 American or $100  Canadian. But buy from a reliable supplier, a known pharmacy and don't cheap out on an unknown, probably knock-off and untrustworthy brand. You might have to spend more to get one that works at all. Do your research and due diligeance to avoid error and wasted time and money, as well as anxiety and fear.
 
2020-05-07 10:40:16 PM  

SonOfSpam: I messaged my doctor again and he said that antibody tests were now available. I went in and had some blood taken and they sent it to the main lab in Tulsa. Later that day it came back negative so I guess I didn't have it after all, assuming that the test is accurate. The results did note that the test is not yet FDA approved so there is still an element of uncertainty. My wife is still not convinced that I did not have it.


https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/24/he​a​lth/coronavirus-antibody-tests.html

In the new research, researchers found that only one of the tests never delivered a so-called false positive - that is, it never mistakenly signaled antibodies in people who did not have them.
Two other tests did not deliver false-positive results 99 percent of the time.
But the converse was not true. Even these three tests detected antibodies in infected people only 90 percent of the time, at best.

There is also lag time between the time you get done with your infection and when there's enough COVID-19-specific antibodies to detect.
 
2020-05-07 10:41:50 PM  
Thanks everyone for sharing. There's a whole spectrum of severity and every infection is a dice roll. Like Forrest Gump, you never know what you're gonna get. Statistically, for some of us, it'll be death. But most of us will just pass it on, and many will never even know they were sick.

Even with the antibody tests, which will be a godsend, we can't be sure our behavior won't result in another dice roll. This kind of virus, like SARS and MERS, is not great at provoking an immune response. Having antibodies doesn't mean you have enough of them to prevent you from getting sick again. Even if you could be sure you've had it, and with false positives and false negatives right now you still can't, you can't be sure you won't get it again.

Right now, we're guessing based on past data that sickness gives you some immunity, even if it's only a few months, but we don't know. True herd immunity just isn't an option yet. The only thing we can do is use our big brains and adapt our behavior to jury-rig a pseudo herd immunity by decreasing the risk of transmission.

Later, we may find out that f we have it once we can never get it again and there are ways to decrease the death rate, and we may feel kinda silly for cracking down this hard when we could've been.... I don't know. Loading up on Tamiflu and having parties where we lick each other's eyeballs or something? But right now, with the information we have, this is the smartest thing we can do.
 
2020-05-07 10:44:16 PM  
Glad you are doing better.  Thanks for sharing your story.
 
2020-05-07 10:48:18 PM  
Correction: pulse oximeter. Measures both pulse and percent oxygen species.

I am generally 95 or 98. 99 and 100 are the maximum scores, unattainable by my weak lungs at rest. 96 is low but not a critical go-to-hospital or doctor sign.

80s is poor. 55 is CHECK THE fark INTO A HOSPITAL sign, Use with blood pressure monitors is a good idea if you are at risk of anything heart or breathing related.
 
2020-05-07 10:50:16 PM  

DoBeDoBeLurk: At the beginning of March, after some discussion and checking the COVID-19 numbers where we lived, we decided to go to Wild West Steampunk Con 9 at Old Tucson Studios.


Screw you for taking that chance with everyones life. selfish asshole.  But hey you got to do what you wanted to do.  Ill point you to the countless other fark threads for people that went out and were surprised they caught the virus and spread it.  Fark is pretty relentless.

Welcome to Fark.
 
2020-05-07 10:53:16 PM  

SonOfSpam: So the upshot is, you had some symptoms that may or may not have been caused by COVID-19, and you still don't know. Until you find out, I don't see how your story is particularly useful?


Do you now have the information in your brain that you can be contagious with COVID-19 and not feel very sick? Then it was useful. I linked to multiple sources indicating that most people do not get very sick and they don't all have the same symptoms, whether I had it or not. But people are more likely to sit down and listen to a story than read a lot of dry data.

I will probably get an antibody test sometime this month, and I guess I'll write that up too, so you know what it's like and people won't be scared of it. But these tests are not at the usual standard of accuracy, so even then I won't be sure whether I had it or not. In the meantime, this will be here for people to read and it will make some of them go, "Huh. I don't feel that sick, but I have some of these symptoms and I should try to get a test and isolate myself until then." And that will help.
 
2020-05-07 10:53:22 PM  

null: SonOfSpam: I messaged my doctor again and he said that antibody tests were now available. I went in and had some blood taken and they sent it to the main lab in Tulsa. Later that day it came back negative so I guess I didn't have it after all, assuming that the test is accurate. The results did note that the test is not yet FDA approved so there is still an element of uncertainty. My wife is still not convinced that I did not have it.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/24/hea​lth/coronavirus-antibody-tests.html

In the new research, researchers found that only one of the tests never delivered a so-called false positive - that is, it never mistakenly signaled antibodies in people who did not have them.
Two other tests did not deliver false-positive results 99 percent of the time.
But the converse was not true. Even these three tests detected antibodies in infected people only 90 percent of the time, at best.

There is also lag time between the time you get done with your infection and when there's enough COVID-19-specific antibodies to detect.



Here's a pertinent line from the article: The lesson is that the tests are less likely to produce false negatives the longer ago the initial infection occurred, he said.

It sounds like the longer since you've had the infection, the more likely to get a correct test reading. Well, if I had COVID-19 it was in February and I had the antibody test at the end of April. That would be 8-10 weeks, depending on when you call me "recovered". Seems like that ought to be enough time for an accurate test result.
 
2020-05-07 10:54:44 PM  

brantgoose: Correction: pulse oximeter. Measures both pulse and percent oxygen species.

I am generally 95 or 98. 99 and 100 are the maximum scores, unattainable by my weak lungs at rest. 96 is low but not a critical go-to-hospital or doctor sign.

80s is poor. 55 is CHECK THE fark INTO A HOSPITAL sign, Use with blood pressure monitors is a good idea if you are at risk of anything heart or breathing related.


55 is "how is this person still walking?!"  Doctors have people with COVID-19 walking into hospitals and checking their phones and reporting nothing more than some tiredness and trouble breathing, while the doctors are freaking out because they should be passed out cold.
 
2020-05-07 10:56:22 PM  

SonOfSpam: null: SonOfSpam: I messaged my doctor again and he said that antibody tests were now available. I went in and had some blood taken and they sent it to the main lab in Tulsa. Later that day it came back negative so I guess I didn't have it after all, assuming that the test is accurate. The results did note that the test is not yet FDA approved so there is still an element of uncertainty. My wife is still not convinced that I did not have it.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/24/hea​lth/coronavirus-antibody-tests.html

In the new research, researchers found that only one of the tests never delivered a so-called false positive - that is, it never mistakenly signaled antibodies in people who did not have them.
Two other tests did not deliver false-positive results 99 percent of the time.
But the converse was not true. Even these three tests detected antibodies in infected people only 90 percent of the time, at best.

There is also lag time between the time you get done with your infection and when there's enough COVID-19-specific antibodies to detect.


Here's a pertinent line from the article: The lesson is that the tests are less likely to produce false negatives the longer ago the initial infection occurred, he said.

It sounds like the longer since you've had the infection, the more likely to get a correct test reading. Well, if I had COVID-19 it was in February and I had the antibody test at the end of April. That would be 8-10 weeks, depending on when you call me "recovered". Seems like that ought to be enough time for an accurate test result.


True, but the FDA's not tested the tests on the market, they've been put on the market through emergency use authorizations -- and many tests have not even got those.  So the FDA's now trying to sort out what tests are good and bad and some of the tests that have been done are bad tests.
 
2020-05-07 11:01:46 PM  
Glad you're doing better!

The saddest part for me has been seeing people I went to school with snap.

i.imgur.comView Full Size


All over the frigging place.

People that... back in the day would have laughed in someone's face at a party for going "HURR DURR BIG GOVMINT'S GONNA MAKE A CHEMTRAIL 5G VIRUS AND TAKE OVER. IT'S GONNA BE A GLOBALIST GOVERNMENT FOR THE ENTIRE PLANET RUN BY JEWS!"

/local wingnuts in my city's local Facebook group post conspiracy theory videos every day
//I report the videos to YT who take them down
///it is fun to see them go "BAWWW CENSORSHIP! THEY TOOK DOWN THAT VIDEO! BAWWW!"
 
2020-05-07 11:03:26 PM  

naughtyrev: This basically mirrors my own experience. I live in Chicago, take the train to and from work (or, I did) and on March 12th I began experiencing severe chills and had a cough for a few days by that time. On the 13th, I was unable to go in to the office. Over the next week, I never got what anyone would call a fever, but my normal body temp ranges around 96.4-5, so when I'm hitting 99 I'm personally burning up, which I was, and I topped out at 101. Dry cough that wouldn't stop, I got winded doing the dishes, didn't want to eat, could barely think. That's not an exaggeration, either, I literally had to stop and sit down in the middle of washing dishes on more than one occasion. Did a teleconference with my doctor, and he told me to assume I had it, stay away from the ER unless I couldn't breathe at all, and good luck because I couldn't get a test because I couldn't confirm I had been in contact with someone who had it - which isn't QUITE  a true Catch-22, but I'm sure Joseph Heller would appreciate it.

It's now May 7th, and I still have a lingering dry cough and can only barely do any routine on my exercise bike before I'm ready to collapse. Almost 2 months, I'm barely functional when I was very active right before.


Had mine at end of January. My lungs still feel like they are operating at around 70%. Some days feel better, some worse. I go downstairs to get my son a snack a drink before reading him a story and I'm winded just reading a book. :(
 
2020-05-07 11:05:09 PM  
Around the 2nd week of March I sneezed and jokes to my my coworker that it was the "oh no am I getting sick sneezes". By the end of the  the day I was a little tired.  However this was the first week of the time change and that tends to throw me pretty good.  By the next morning I felt OK, if a little tired with just some sinus pressure.  I went to work, and lasted about an hour before thinking I should get out of there in case something was up.  That day when I left I was wearing a t-shirt and nothing else.  When I got outside I felt cold.  I am usually a large sweaty person who loves the cold. I went home and took a nap.  The next few days I felt OK, just lingering sinus pressure.  I chalked this up to the time change and the fact I had been raking leaves the Sunday before.
Until Thursday, when I felt like I had a fever.  I checked it and it was 99.7 and more noticably, I felt "sick".  I can't explain it.  Just "sick".  The closest I can describe is that when I was a kid I had scarlet fever.  It vaguely felt like that.  I can still remember how it felt.  I never had any other symptoms.  I had three teledoc visits because the low grade fever persisted for like 5 weeks.  I was unable to be tested.  I live in Queens.  There were many more people needing testing more than I did.  I spent 4 weeks in the bedroom of our 1BR apartment, so as to not infect my wife.  I also fastidiously sanitized the bathroom after using it.  Finally my fever was low with spikes only to 99.0-99.2. Afer a discussion with my GP, he determined it was probably safe for me to leave the house with masks etc. Due to lack of other symptoms and me being a historically large sweaty person 99.0-2 may be my normal temp.

Today, my wife and I went for antibody testing.

It was, quite frankly, terrifying to be in that waiting room but that's another story.

Wear the masks everyone.  Wear the masks.
 
2020-05-07 11:06:51 PM  
Here's mine. I've posted pieces of it, but here's the full one: 

March 11: By this time I've known about it since January. I was working at UCLA, so duh. But I had to take my son to his pediatrician to get his vaccines. No one had masks. The doctor's office didn't have any hand sanitizer, and this was just the start of the panic buying. Off we go. This is the only incidence of exposure that is outside the rest of my family (important, because none of them got sick). The only other place of note I went to was Walmart, but so did the rest of my family. None of them had symptoms. 

March 14th: About 11:30a I get a headache. One of those "I'd like to sit in the dark" migraines. I'd heard whispers of this, but it was not a confirmed symptom. By 2pm, I couldn't sing an entire 3 1/2 minute song (and I can sing for hours). Sit down, light headed. Okay, now I'm in trouble. Lost my sense of smell at around 4p when my mom started cooking for dinner. At 6pm, I'm popping a 99.8 (I'm usually 98.6, but I can spike in the afternoons to 99.3). Headache disappeared as soon as the fever started. I know I'm checking too many of the boxes, and I'm not prone to hypochondria and we are an *incredibly* healthy family.

March 15th: I wake up, and yeah, this is bad. I can feel the heat from my fever against the pillow. Let everyone in the house know I'm self-quarantining. Most likely by this time they would have already been exposed? 14 days later none of them had symptoms (thank god). Can't breathe, moving brings on fits of coughs, but my o2 sat never dips below 96. I remember feeling weird, disoriented, kinda like the toilet head you get with a cold but the dry cough of a flu. 

I spend the next 3 days trying to get a test. It isn't until I show up at the hospital in an N95 coughing my lungs out that they take me seriously. Once the doc sees my skin (I have a lot of psoriasis) he goes "Oh you're getting a test." 

By Thursday the fever broke, and I left my room after 72 hours asymptomatic. I got my test results back a couple days later. Negative, but I don't know that it's worth much. I did test negative for flu and RSV (and those tests were working), so I don't know wtf else I could have had with the same presentation. I really want to get an antibody test when I can trust they actually have decent ones and the FDA is doing its job. 

So either we did an incredible job isolating as soon as I went symptomatic (and I went symptomatic fast), or my entire family has had it and were completely asymptomatic (4 adults, 1 is 83 and two others with COPD). Either way, no one got sick with whatever it was I had. I wish I lived in a country where I could be sure either way, but the trust just isn't there with the CDC and the FDA essentially rubberstamping whatever Trump wants to believe. 

It's maddening enough trying to follow all the recommendations. It's doubly so when normally trusted leadership decides to go AWOL.
 
2020-05-07 11:10:45 PM  

SonOfSpam: t sounds like the longer since you've had the infection, the more likely to get a correct test reading. Well, if I had COVID-19 it was in February and I had the antibody test at the end of April. That would be 8-10 weeks, depending on when you call me "recovered". Seems like that ought to be enough time for an accurate test result.


More likely =/= Totally sure. Some of these tests have a 15% error rate at best, and it's the wild west out there with many of them unregulated and I still think the FDA haven't approved any... *checks* Yeeeaah. Looks like they're giving some companies "clearance" but not approval yet.

mayochamp: Screw you for taking that chance with everyones life. selfish asshole.  But hey you got to do what you wanted to do.  Ill point you to the countless other fark threads for people that went out and were surprised they caught the virus and spread it.  Fark is pretty relentless.

Welcome to Fark.


I made a decision based on inadequate information, which my state put out based on inadequate testing. I was led to believe nobody was sick in my area. Lots and lots of other people meet that standard for selfish asshole behavior, the convention was well attended, and we had a gem and mineral show a couple weeks earlier too. If I had more accurate information, I would've stayed home. But there are plenty of people who wouldn't behave responsibly no matter what you tell them. The only thing that would've kept them home was government action to cancel these events and that didn't happen.

Even if I was part of a chain that ended in lives lost (and I was honest with you about that), I haven't hurt as many people as the bad decisions that went into my state's response to the pandemic. Yell at me all you want, but that won't make any difference right now. AZ and many other states are still acting like idiots and the damage they are doing is ongoing. Channel that anger where it will do some good and write your governor, and continue to wear a mask and socially distance.
 
2020-05-07 11:14:04 PM  

IRestoreFurniture: I also fastidiously sanitized the bathroom after using it.


That was an important point I forgot to mention. 

Sanitized everything I touched from the farthest point from my bedroom working towards it. Wore an N95 if I left my room. Didn't even allow anyone to touch my cat (who lives in my room most of the time). 

I tell folks that say they have OCD "That's not fair. You all had practice at this first."
 
2020-05-07 11:18:50 PM  

DoBeDoBeLurk: ...
I'm 39 years old, female, fat, I need a CPAP at night because I stop breathing, I have chronic pain and ongoing health issues, I'm a high-functioning autistic and I live in a red state. My experience will not be yours. The point is, you may not feel even as sick as I did, but you can still be contagious and hurt people. You can follow current guidelines to the letter and still hurt people, because we're learning more about this disease all the time. It's a new disease. That's what "novel coronavirus" means.
---


Hope you feel better every day, and thanks for the information.   Just a couple questions:
Did you lose your sense of smell / taste early, or after the other symptoms started?
Do you and your SO have different blood types?
If you had virus type childhood diseases (like chicken pox) did you have a strong reaction to them, or mild?

And please come back to your thread here if you think of any more characteristics that might give a hint as to why your SO did not appear to get it , and you did.  Good Luck to you both!
 
2020-05-07 11:20:54 PM  

Peki: IRestoreFurniture: I also fastidiously sanitized the bathroom after using it.

That was an important point I forgot to mention. 

Sanitized everything I touched from the farthest point from my bedroom working towards it. Wore an N95 if I left my room. Didn't even allow anyone to touch my cat (who lives in my room most of the time). 

I tell folks that say they have OCD "That's not fair. You all had practice at this first."


I tried to keep the cat out of the bedroom but it was futile for the most part.

I have a much better awareness of cleanliness and cross contamination than my wife.  I feel like a jerk but sometimes I see her about to or in the process of doing something unsafe and a have to yell "stop".

I've explained to her that this is just not a normal time and I'm only protecting us.
 
2020-05-07 11:29:48 PM  
Thanks for sharing!
 
2020-05-07 11:34:12 PM  

DoBeDoBeLurk: I know I sneezed unmasked in a Fry's


That wasn't the one on Ina, was it? :-/
 
2020-05-07 11:35:17 PM  

iToad: Always interesting to hear first-hand stories like this. And masking up in public is the right thing to do.

Unfortunately, for a lot of people living in Trumpistan, masks are political statements. Some people still don't realize that masks don't protect you. They protect everybody else, if you happen to be infected without symptoms. And they appear to actually work. They are not a symbol of the deep state trying to take away your freedom to do whatever you want.

So don't get stuck on stupid over politics. Wear a mask.


Ill wear a mask as soon as you start making some.

Don't make some?  Don't expect me to wear ant?  How am I risking public health?   Not the one who put make manufacturing in China, I'm the one who's worked healthcare for 6 years.

My point is why should I not want to see society collapse?

Lol me, throw me in jail.

I'm not going to go out of my way to get people sick

But I'm not going to care about a society currently sitting on the bones of my plague stricken ancestors where you expect me to fight with a stick for a gun.

Give me the proper tools like you should have and I'll participate.

You failed yourselves as human beings and having to wear masks (made up of whatever)is proof

You don't even have N95 masks for healthcare workers, this is beyond clown shoes.

So when this thing mutates and kills all the doctors and nurses you have no masks, whatcha guys gonna do then?
 
2020-05-07 11:36:55 PM  

Peki: y Thursday the fever broke, and I left my room after 72 hours asymptomatic. I got my test results back a couple days later. Negative, but I don't know that it's worth much. I did test negative for flu and RSV (and those tests were working), so I don't know wtf else I could have had with the same presentation. I really want to get an antibody test when I can trust they actually have decent ones and the FDA is doing its job.


Do not forget that the early tests were broken/unreliable.  So you're talking about a test the third week of March when we knew the tests were still junk.
 
2020-05-07 11:48:10 PM  

null: Peki: y Thursday the fever broke, and I left my room after 72 hours asymptomatic. I got my test results back a couple days later. Negative, but I don't know that it's worth much. I did test negative for flu and RSV (and those tests were working), so I don't know wtf else I could have had with the same presentation. I really want to get an antibody test when I can trust they actually have decent ones and the FDA is doing its job.

Do not forget that the early tests were broken/unreliable.  So you're talking about a test the third week of March when we knew the tests were still junk.


Yup, I'm aware. Which is why I'm not gonna bother with any other tests until an antibody, and even that I can't trust just yet.

Which sucks, because I'd really like to prove immunity so I can go volunteer as a death doula. *sigh*
 
2020-05-07 11:48:56 PM  
Mine began mid-February.  My normal cold/flu sequence is always the same, headache and sore throat to start, NEVER a fever, then it moves behind my eyes to my sinuses, then to bronchitis.  7-10 days, then i feel like I'm reborn and energetic and all is done.

Around the 2nd week of whatever this was, a little more than a week after a co-worker had recently returned from an unusual sickness possibly brought from Sacramento while visiting relatives, I had this odd buzzing in my lower chest, like rattling mucus.  I told everyone at work, "if this is a cold, I've never had one like this, this is new."  I was CERTAIN it could not be COVID-19, as it wasn't anywhere in my area I was told.  The day after that I realized something was wrong and stayed home.  My symptoms went as they normally would, but my chest was an issue the entire time.  If it wasn't for almost inhaling mist 24x7 from my cool mist humidifier, I would have coughed my brains out (it stopped the tickle).  That was the only thing that slowed it; that and cough syrup.  I took one Aspirin with one Tylenol for the headache, which lasted about 5-6 days, and yes, it became terrible in my sinuses like any cold.  I still fought to cough up the rattling, but never could.  The last time I coughed like that, I had croup when I was young; that insane seal 'barking' you do with croup.

Took Emergen-C pretty much every day.  Never had a fever, but I never get fevers, can't remember the last time I had one and usually use a thermometer (doctor's advice and all).

By day 8, It seemed to be going away and then day 9, got worse again.  At this point I gave up and called my doctor.  I went in and they made me mask up, had a general conversation (no fever) and he prescribed Azithromycin, a common antibiotic for chest issues like pneumonia.  I didn't have "labored breathing", so no test for me.  I don't think at that time there were any in my area anyway.  One day after taking that, I felt much better, but it didn't last.  As I told my wife, I'm getting 1% better per day... such a slow recovery.

That wasn't the end, however.  It was another week before the fatigue from general movement finally went away.  Sitting at my desk was fine, but a short walk on break made me dizzy.

For the next month, symptoms kept coming back for half a day, then disappear.  Sore throat, headache, weird sensation when breathing, like my throat was coated in something cool.  After about a month after finishing my antibiotic, I finally started to feel more normal.  However, those weird feelings in my throat would come back and slight sore throat and cough for that entire time.  I also had some weird discolored (dark brown) dryness on the back of my heel, where the achilles is at that hung around for a month.  I never would have associated that with my 'cold'.

I've left messages with my doctor to try and get the antibody test, but no calls yet.  Going to call them again tomorrow, as my insurance has indicated they will pay for it (all my tests are free for me).

I still have doubts.  I had no fever and only lost my sense of taste for 2-4 days.  I did lose my sense of smell for quite some time, but only for delicate smells.  About a month after my treatment with Azithromycin, I went for our first walk outside and my wife was mentioning the smell of some trees or flowers and I could not smell them, even close up.

My wife got it but her primary symptoms were fatigue and extremely runny nose, which lasted a week and infuriated her.  She did cough, but not that much and never wanted to see the doctor.  She slept a lot in that week.

So, did I, didn't I??  Who knows, but I hope my damn doctor will order the test so I can find out.

Be well everyone.
 
2020-05-07 11:55:26 PM  

nanim: Hope you feel better every day, and thanks for the information.   Just a couple questions:
Did you lose your sense of smell / taste early, or after the other symptoms started?
Do you and your SO have different blood types?
If you had virus type childhood diseases (like chicken pox) did you have a strong reaction to them, or mild?

And please come back to your thread here if you think of any more characteristics that might give a hint as to why your SO did not appear to get it , and you did.  Good Luck to you both!


I can't be sure when I stopped tasting things. I could still detect sweet and spicy the whole time, and I had a stuffy nose, so that makes it a bit hard to taste anyway when my allergies flare up. At the time, I didn't know that was also a symptom until I looked it up. I would say early in the incubation period I started to taste things less, and it got worse. At my sickest, I just didn't enjoy food very much and I only wanted sodas because they were sweet and the fizz settled my stomach. It never got to the point where I couldn't eat, I just didn't like it.

I can't confirm blood types because it's not in our medical records. He thinks he's O+ and I'm not sure about myself. I can't donate because I have a history of anemia and I'm often borderline with tiny red blood cells working hard to compensate.

I never had chicken pox. I managed to avoid it until was about 16, and when the vaccine came out I jumped on it because I know the older you get, the sicker you get. I've had all my shots, including all of the hepatitis ones, (insert joke about "No WONDER you're autistic!" here) because I worked in childcare before I wrecked my back and my health in general tanked. I've had multiple surgeries, including a hysterectomy. My thyroid quit giving me enough hormones in my teen years - that is probably because my father was exposed to Agent Orange in Vietnam, there is some correlation with that in children of Vietnam Vets. My medical history reads like a horror novel. At the moment, I have chronic pain and infections and my hair is falling out for some reason, still undiagnosed. If preexisting conditions were all that mattered, this thing should've torn me up like a lion on a slow gazelle, but it didn't.

My S/O had severe asthma as a child, which is better controlled as an adult. He has Type 2 diabetes, but it's controlled with medication, not insulin dependent. He's also had some weird medical stuff, including a shoulder muscle that was 3X as large as it should've been and needed surgical correction because it was strangling one of his veins. He also uses a CPAP.

We decided not to breed. I don't think we need to find out what kind of pitiful mutant our broken bodies would produce.

This is only an anecdote, it is not data. But it reinforces the point that COVID-19 is a dice roll. If it were fair, it would've picked me off for being so unhealthy by now. I can't be sure if I had it. I'm trying to get an antibody test, as they become available, but they're not very accurate. You shouldn't be using my information to make a checklist and decide how safe you are - I know it's tempting, but we just don't have enough information to figure that out now.

Hence the need for widespread testing and social distancing and masks.
 
2020-05-08 12:03:33 AM  

C18H27NO3: DoBeDoBeLurk: I know I sneezed unmasked in a Fry's

That wasn't the one on Ina, was it? :-/


First and Grant. I wanted to set up my prescriptions for delivery but there's something weird in their records and I can't confirm it's me over the phone or online and I have to go in and give them my name every time. I'm still not sure how to fix it or what the problem is.

links136: [a grammatically unsound train wreck of true selfish asshole behavior]


Do you know what to do with blue text on the internet? Click it. If you have a t-shirt and a scissors or a bandanna and some hair elastics, you have the tools to be less of a jackass. If you hate the world so much you want it to end, there are more elegant solutions that will do less damage to the rest of us.
 
2020-05-08 12:21:50 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size

Was hot today. Now cold in the house.

/threadjack over
//humble hvac
///Waiting for june
 
2020-05-08 12:23:37 AM  

links136: iToad: Always interesting to hear first-hand stories like this. And masking up in public is the right thing to do.

Unfortunately, for a lot of people living in Trumpistan, masks are political statements. Some people still don't realize that masks don't protect you. They protect everybody else, if you happen to be infected without symptoms. And they appear to actually work. They are not a symbol of the deep state trying to take away your freedom to do whatever you want.

So don't get stuck on stupid over politics. Wear a mask.

Ill wear a mask as soon as you start making some.

Don't make some?  Don't expect me to wear ant?  How am I risking public health?   Not the one who put make manufacturing in China, I'm the one who's worked healthcare for 6 years.

My point is why should I not want to see society collapse?

Lol me, throw me in jail.

I'm not going to go out of my way to get people sick

But I'm not going to care about a society currently sitting on the bones of my plague stricken ancestors where you expect me to fight with a stick for a gun.

Give me the proper tools like you should have and I'll participate.

You failed yourselves as human beings and having to wear masks (made up of whatever)is proof

You don't even have N95 masks for healthcare workers, this is beyond clown shoes.

So when this thing mutates and kills all the doctors and nurses you have no masks, whatcha guys gonna do then?


What the actual fark?
 
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