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(Some Guy)   Those "giant asian murder hornets"? Yeah, about those   (ucanr.edu) divider line
    More: Followup, Honey bee, Insect, Beekeeping, Asian giant hornets, Wasp, Afrianizedhoney bees, researcher Lynn Kimsey, Vespa nests  
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12080 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 May 2020 at 6:05 PM (23 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

 
2020-05-05 6:07:44 PM  
63 votes:
The issue is that they destroy domestic bee colonies.

That is the issue.
 
2020-05-05 4:43:02 PM  
43 votes:
That's what they said about coronavirus.
 
2020-05-05 6:19:42 PM  
24 votes:
"It's ridiculous to call them murder hornets," says noted UC Davis wasp expert and researcher Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology and professor of entomology, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology.
"It's no more likely to sting and kill a human than a honey bee,"



You would think an "expert" would know they got the name "murder hornets" because they would raid bee hives and rip off the heads of the bees and bring the bodies back to feed their young.
 
2020-05-05 6:17:20 PM  
17 votes:
Asian murder hornet attacking mouse
Youtube zoSrowxmy5w


Whatever......here is a vid of one of these farkers killing a mouse in under a minute.
 
2020-05-05 6:11:12 PM  
16 votes:
They should be culled from anywhere outside their origin site.

They are an invasive species and didn't fly here; they were brought here by idiots.

Yes, I am still talking about the Asian hornets.
 
2020-05-05 6:18:15 PM  
14 votes:
I do not like how she poo-poos the Africanized bees problem. They have killed or hurt a lot of people and animals.
 
2020-05-05 7:17:19 PM  
13 votes:
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-05 6:39:23 PM  
12 votes:
Have you seen what the stings do to human skin? Those pictures are only a GIS away.  Spoiler: they look like bullet holes.  I think I'll stick with "murder hornets," fark you very much.
 
2020-05-05 6:29:15 PM  
12 votes:
So the article starts off as "so about those hornets"

Explains that they don't like the nickname they got.

Then goes into how bad it is that they are here and we need to destroy them. Got it. So she doesn't like the nickname they gave it. Sorry lady. We get it, you like bugs ya weirdo
 
2020-05-05 6:36:32 PM  
10 votes:
I don't care how unlikely they are to sting me. Once is two times too many.

I'd rather get people on board in removing an invasive species instead of dismissing another one until it's too late.
 
2020-05-05 6:32:39 PM  
9 votes:
Interesting that she makes no attempt to debug (heh) the claims that these hornets kill 50 people a year in Japan.
 
2020-05-05 6:16:07 PM  
9 votes:
The colony was found September of last year, and we're just panicking about it now?

We're bad at this.
 
2020-05-05 6:09:41 PM  
8 votes:
In the documentary I saw on them, they were called "Cracker Jackers"

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-05 6:50:13 PM  
6 votes:
"It's ridiculous to call them murder hornets," says noted UC Davis wasp expert and researcher Lynn Kimsey

Deadly giant hornets kill 42 people in China

"It's no more likely to sting and kill a human than a honey bee," said Kimsey

Vespa mandarinia workers often fly 1 to 2 km from their nest, but can travel up to 8 km. Thus, they will not hesitate on chasing a victim several kilometres if necessary.
 
2020-05-05 6:48:38 PM  
6 votes:
Fark user image

This is what happens when all of the English majors are snapped up by Starbucks.
 
2020-05-05 6:40:10 PM  
6 votes:

dennysgod: "It's ridiculous to call them murder hornets," says noted UC Davis wasp expert and researcher Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology and professor of entomology, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology.
"It's no more likely to sting and kill a human than a honey bee,"


You would think an "expert" would know they got the name "murder hornets" because they would raid bee hives and rip off the heads of the bees and bring the bodies back to feed their young.


I think her complaint is that it's a recent and sensationalist name.  I saw a documentary about Asian Giant Hornets years ago, and not once did I hear them called "murder hornets".  Last week was the first I heard that term.

What I found interesting about the documentary was how the bees deal with them: they all cover them as a big ball of bee.  The hornet dies of heat exhaustion pretty quickly if it can't get free.
 
2020-05-05 6:29:43 PM  
6 votes:

maxandgrinch: "It's no more likely to sting and kill a human than a honey bee,"


Uh...doesn't this thing make a living out of stinging and killing honey bees, lady?
 
2020-05-05 6:07:29 PM  
6 votes:
And if you want to fear something fear "red velvet ants" a/k/a cow killers:

https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/​s​tinging-insects/velvet-ants-cow-killer​s/
 
2020-05-05 7:44:29 PM  
5 votes:
This article misses the whole point. Murder hornets aren't a threat to people per se. The possibility that they can decimate bee colonies, which are already teetering as it is, is the reason why people should be freaking out.
 
2020-05-05 6:33:29 PM  
5 votes:

born_yesterday: maxandgrinch: "It's no more likely to sting and kill a human than a honey bee,"

Uh...doesn't this thing make a living out of stinging and killing honey bees, lady?


I'm assuming that was an ambiguous grammatical choice.  She probably meant "no more likely to sting and kill a human than a honey bee is," not "no more likely to sting and kill a human than it is to sting and kill a honey bee."
 
2020-05-05 6:08:14 PM  
5 votes:
Subby, how dare you not over react to this. Somebody is going to revoke your NuFark membership card.
 
2020-05-05 8:37:41 PM  
4 votes:

raygundan: CrazyCurt: Why YES the Tarantula are what they lay their eggs in and the grubs eat the host before hatching WHY DO YOU ASK!?

But yeah... we're all freaking out about two-inch hornets when there's already two-inch wasps native to the US.


Kind of apples and oranges.

Tarantula wasps go after... tarantulas.  They keep to themselves and don't usually sting unless you go out of your way to fark with them.

Suzume Bachi go after... anything.  They're hungry.  They *really* like honeybee hives and can wipe out an entire hive for lunch.

So, big problem #1: They massacre honeybee hives

Suzume Bachi also don't keep to themselves.  They'll go after you because you got in their way.  If they're feeling irritated or for any dang capricious whim.

Also, the tarantual wasp sting while painful doesn't do any damage.

Suzume Bachi sting can cause real damage.

So yeah, there's a bit of a difference between the two creatures.
 
2020-05-05 6:15:26 PM  
4 votes:
Afrianized?
 
2020-05-05 8:29:20 PM  
3 votes:
When will it be our turn to unleash one of our North American pests on Asia?   It seems a little one sided to me.   Which animal would we send?   I vote for horse flies or no see ums.
 
2020-05-05 7:10:20 PM  
3 votes:

Beerguy: [iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/zoSrowxm​y5w?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3​A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&start=0&enablejsap​i=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&​widgetid=1]

Whatever......here is a vid of one of these farkers killing a mouse in under a minute.


When the colony gets big and hungry, they'll take on anything.

So, this lady... okay.  Calling them "Murder Hornets" is a bit much I agree, but they're no joke.

1) They're extremely ornery, aggressive and territorial.   They're not "more likely" to sting than a honey bee, they're ill-tempered malevolent bastards.  More than yellowjackets.  More like roid raging yellowjackets.
2) They'll wipe out whole colonies of honey bees.  For lunch.  It's not even a contest. More of a curb-stomp
3) They're really big and sound like B52 bombers going by.  You won't forget that sound.
4) They've got a 1/4 inch stinger that's going to pass through most of your clothes
5) That stinger packs a neurotoxin that hurts and also as per people I've known who have been stung can give limb weakness for about a week.  It wouldn't take more than a few of them to give you a really bad day.  Or a last day.
6) They're voracious hunters.  They can hunt in packs.  They'll take on anything they think they can cut up and cart back to the hive.
 
2020-05-05 6:51:40 PM  
3 votes:
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-05 6:40:08 PM  
3 votes:
FTA: "The colony everyone is hyperventilating over was actually found on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, last September when it was destroyed and then a single, dead hornet was found in December in Blaine, Wash.," Kimsey said. "There is no evidence that there are any more hornets in the vicinity of Vancouver or anywhere else on the West Coast."

lol. I kept looking for more information about the Murder Hornet infestation. Maybe this is why I couldn't find any.
 
2020-05-05 6:36:09 PM  
3 votes:

Porkbelly: And if you want to fear something fear "red velvet ants" a/k/a cow killers:

https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/s​tinging-insects/velvet-ants-cow-killer​s/


NOPEing so hard right now...
 
2020-05-05 6:18:04 PM  
3 votes:
The gorillas I ordered are showing 'out for delivery'. No way am I sending them back at this point.
 
2020-05-06 12:36:01 AM  
2 votes:

BolloxReader: Clark W Griswald: I dunno. If the bees get wiped out right on their doorstep, then simply putting wire mesh over the hives that would still allow pollen laden drones access, but not humongous hornets should solve the problem. Or am I missing something?

It will keep the Hornets out but the bees will still come crawling out to challenge them.


I guess if you made it big enough, maybe keeping the hive 2-3' away from the cage the hornets may not trigger the defensive instincts.

I'll betcha the hornets still sit there though and pick off the bees one by one as they leave for foraging.
 
2020-05-05 9:20:23 PM  
2 votes:

mrparks: The colony was found September of last year, and we're just panicking about it now?

We're bad at this.


Yes and no. Another colony found in November implies that they may have just gone dormant for winter and could return in spring.

No one is saying panic, they are saying to let local wildlife officials know if you see them because they're invasive.

https://beta.ctvnews.ca/local/british​-​columbia/2020/5/3/1_4922871.html
 
2020-05-05 7:55:30 PM  
2 votes:
As an invasive species that could be a threat to pollinators, they're a worry if they manage to get established.  As an "oh god it's gonna eat me," not so much, since there's so few at this point.  Especially since we've already got native stuff that size in the US-- like the Tarantula Hawk, a wasp about the size of this asian hornet that paralyzes tarantulas, carries them home, and then recreates the xenomorph lifecycle from aliens by laying its eggs in the living tarantula and letting them eat their way out.
 
2020-05-05 7:52:21 PM  
2 votes:

TwilightZone: Okay, I'm in the San Fernando Valley in Southern California and I'm certain I saw one of these in my garden last year-- late spring I think.  I'd never seen anything like it so I did some research.  Kind of creepy.  Haven't seen anything like it since.


You have Tarantula Hawks which are bigger. However they're iridescent purple-black and sleek like a space ship. I heard and then saw just one of those and noped off to Nopeville.

/ Very unlikely to attack or bother people though and even somewhat docile ... unless you're a tarantula.
// Why YES the Tarantula are what they lay their eggs in and the grubs eat the host before hatching WHY DO YOU ASK!?
/// FARK WASPS for the 3
 
2020-05-05 7:29:57 PM  
2 votes:
Interesting ...

On a side note I was thinking of a way a troublemaker once annoyed the hell out of an entire dormitory. He got a bunch of us to chip in and buy a vial of cockroach pheromones. He proceeded to open the cap and roll it under the large space under the door of the room for the dorm's biggest asshat Nazi resident assistant ( and for the record he was at least a WW2 Germanphile and was proud of his paraphernalia ). It didn't take long but the roaches began a march. Thousands. Tens of thousands. Hundreds of thousands probably. By the night asshat's room was a foot deep at spots of writing roach mass. Whole floor was closed so the maintenance folks ( poor bastards, sorry about that ) could shovel the bugs into bag after bag after bag. Nothing like full garbage bags containing a writing mass of insects.

Considering the enemies we have no and how far more Nazi they are I've been intrigued by this 'prank' again. But where do I get such pheromones? Who would know and what facility might have them?

U.C.Davis. That's just down the street ( practically ). And I have a name.

/ Enjoy the yellowjackets at the next Maga convention.
 
2020-05-05 7:19:38 PM  
2 votes:

Beerguy: [YouTube video: Asian murder hornet attacking mouse]

Whatever......here is a vid of one of these farkers killing a mouse in under a minute.


I thought it was going to be a wildlife documentary but then it made a beeline (heh) to the cameraman and I realized it was found footage.
 
2020-05-05 6:29:21 PM  
2 votes:
Trumpers are saying they were genetically engineered by the Deep State, Pelosi and Obama to make Trump look bad.
 
2020-05-05 6:25:14 PM  
2 votes:

dennysgod: "It's ridiculous to call them murder hornets," says noted UC Davis wasp expert and researcher Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology and professor of entomology, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology.
"It's no more likely to sting and kill a human than a honey bee,"


You would think an "expert" would know they got the name "murder hornets" because they would raid bee hives and rip off the heads of the bees and bring the bodies back to feed their young.


Why would an entomologist care that a rag in Japan gave them a sensationalist name that eventually spread to America when the B.C. colony was found?

It's not a scientist's job to track stupid nicknames pop media comes up with for things.
 
2020-05-05 6:16:43 PM  
2 votes:
All I got out of it

Mmmm Nanaimo bars
 
2020-05-05 6:16:07 PM  
2 votes:
One found in Blaine? If they did in fact migrate south, they'd get to Mount Vernon then turn around and go back.
 
2020-05-06 8:18:38 AM  
1 vote:

NathanAllen: Wasps are assholes. I've been waging an annual war against them in my garden shed. They build, I kill. For a decade.


Wasps generally are fairly docile and beneficial critters.  Now hornets, they are often more aggressive and I have a little more fear of them.  But trump is really what scares the billybejesus out of me.
 
2020-05-05 11:40:45 PM  
1 vote:

Clark W Griswald: I dunno. If the bees get wiped out right on their doorstep, then simply putting wire mesh over the hives that would still allow pollen laden drones access, but not humongous hornets should solve the problem. Or am I missing something?


Sounds like a good idea. I can't think of a reason why it wouldn't work.
 
2020-05-05 11:19:34 PM  
1 vote:
Wasps are assholes. I've been waging an annual war against them in my garden shed. They build, I kill. For a decade.
 
2020-05-05 11:12:11 PM  
1 vote:

highli99: When will it be our turn to unleash one of our North American pests on Asia?   It seems a little one sided to me.   Which animal would we send?   I vote for horse flies or no see ums.


There are only 2 species from North America that I know of that have been transplanted to other parts of the world. One is the raccoon which is wreaking havoc in Europe.  The other is the Gray squirrel which is driving the brits mad.
 
2020-05-05 9:12:51 PM  
1 vote:

Cultured: Nick Nostril: Swallowing one alive cures Coronavirus, right?

Actually...[Fark user image 425x318]


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-05 9:06:32 PM  
1 vote:
Yea but, the Japanese bee's have a defense: smother them with heat from beating their wings.
Do ours? (no). That could be an issue.
 
2020-05-05 8:25:26 PM  
1 vote:

SwiftFox: The imported yellow jackets are bad enough. Through two years of a plague of them (mild winters) I was happy to host a huge hornet's nest under the eaves of an upstairs window, and watch them through it carrying a steady stream of yellow jackets in to feed their young. The hornets never were aggressive and my yard and neighbors' you could have picnics in without the "meat bees" joining in.


I had an air force of paper wasps last time I had a tomato patch. Unnerving at first, because they really give no farks at all about personal space, but all they ever did was eat the shiat out of these little green caterpillar bastards.
 
2020-05-05 8:16:24 PM  
1 vote:
The imported yellow jackets are bad enough. Through two years of a plague of them (mild winters) I was happy to host a huge hornet's nest under the eaves of an upstairs window, and watch them through it carrying a steady stream of yellow jackets in to feed their young. The hornets never were aggressive and my yard and neighbors' you could have picnics in without the "meat bees" joining in.
 
2020-05-05 8:06:51 PM  
1 vote:
My concern over these insects was regarding their potential as yet another invasive species.   In which case they pose a serious risk to our ecology.   A very real concern that this expert does not address.  From what I gather from the article, it is still unknown if this species is getting a foothold in North America.

You would be a bit hysterical to assume that these insects were deadly to humans. Few insects the world actually are deadly to humans.  However, I would not want to come across one of these, because they look very painful.
 
2020-05-05 8:00:10 PM  
1 vote:

CrazyCurt: Why YES the Tarantula are what they lay their eggs in and the grubs eat the host before hatching WHY DO YOU ASK!?


Important clarification: they lay their eggs in the still-living-but-paralyzed tarantula.  And the grubs eat the still-living host, least-vital tissues first for maximum freshness.  Basically the critters from Aliens, except in two-inch-wasp form living in the American southwest.

The sting is apparently the second-most-painful on earth, but it's brief, with the worst over in about five minutes.  So painful it's disorienting and disabling and the recommendation is roughly "help them lay down on the ground and scream until it passes."

But yeah... we're all freaking out about two-inch hornets when there's already two-inch wasps native to the US.
 
2020-05-05 7:58:40 PM  
1 vote:
Jumping underwater doesn't work with most species of hornets, either.  They will wait up to an hour for you to come out.
 
2020-05-05 7:55:36 PM  
1 vote:

Percise1: I think this is exactly why the .410 shotgun was invented...

That, or a can of Wd-40 and a lighter. Never seen a wasp that was a badass without wings, and those torch instantly.


BunkyBrewman: Afrianized?

You know... urban.


Being that I have shot at a hornets nest with a .410 in my younger years, I can assure you its effectiveness is limited. And they fly faster than you can run.
 
2020-05-05 7:24:54 PM  
1 vote:

sleze: In the documentary I saw on them, they were called "Cracker Jackers"

[Fark user image image 800x534]


When you're really good
they call you Cracker Jack
 
2020-05-05 6:54:25 PM  
1 vote:

sleze: In the documentary I saw on them, they were called "Cracker Jackers"

[Fark user image 800x534]


Jesus Christ, those are Fallout cazadores
 
2020-05-05 6:41:20 PM  
1 vote:

FarkingChas: I do not like how she poo-poos the Africanized bees problem. They have killed or hurt a lot of people and animals.



A Yahooglebing search yields one human death in 2010, in the US and a handful of dogs since then.

Have any legitimate sources of the claim of "killed or hurt a lot of people and animals?" Wikipedia is not a source of legit info.
 
2020-05-05 6:33:21 PM  
1 vote:
I'm no less worried. If I see one, I'll grab the hair spray and lighter. Although that just might make it mad.

Maybe a 12-gauge.
 
2020-05-05 6:30:56 PM  
1 vote:

Nick Nostril: Swallowing one alive cures Coronavirus, right?


Actually...
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-05 6:26:57 PM  
1 vote:

Porkbelly: And if you want to fear something fear "red velvet ants" a/k/a cow killers:

https://www.pestworld.org/pest-guide/s​tinging-insects/velvet-ants-cow-killer​s/


I asked a pest control guy about these.  He'd gotten a few questions, but basically you never see more than one and by the time he could get there it would be gone and the customer would never see another one.
 
2020-05-05 6:25:27 PM  
1 vote:

AbuHashish: One found in Blaine? If they did in fact migrate south, they'd get to Mount Vernon then turn around and go back.

Maybe it needed a new footstool.
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-05 6:20:35 PM  
1 vote:
"It's no more likely to sting and kill a human than a honey bee,"

Until the latest generation of Beavis and Butt-head decide to update a game their parents played.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-05 6:18:44 PM  
1 vote:
Okay, I'm in the San Fernando Valley in Southern California and I'm certain I saw one of these in my garden last year-- late spring I think.  I'd never seen anything like it so I did some research.  Kind of creepy.  Haven't seen anything like it since.
 
2020-05-05 6:14:58 PM  
1 vote:
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-05-05 5:10:19 PM  
1 vote:
So you're saying....they have my address?!? They'll be here soon to eat me? I haven't got a chance against the MURDER HORNETS? Is that what you're saying?!!?!!
 
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