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(PC Gamer)   Turns out, playing a video game can help science. See, Ma, I'm not wasting my life   (pcgamer.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Gearbox Software, Massively multiplayer online game, Borderlands Science, Randy Pitchford, Mayim Bialik, Big Bang, important work, Multiplayer Online Science  
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768 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Apr 2020 at 4:10 AM (13 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



14 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-04-09 1:44:31 AM  
a fun shooter but, with all due respect, not exactly the most intellectually weighty endeavor of all time

Only one of these two things is accurate.
 
2020-04-09 4:36:03 AM  
Games are a good hook for motivation to learn and work.
 
2020-04-09 7:14:01 AM  
Dont forget to tighten up the graphics...


Game testers
Youtube BRWvfMLl4ho
 
2020-04-09 7:23:44 AM  
I always liked the beginning of Stargate Universe where the air force disguised an Ancient code they were trying to crack as a puzzle in an mmorpg.
 
2020-04-09 7:35:14 AM  
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2020-04-09 7:36:35 AM  

AntonChigger: I always liked the beginning of Stargate Universe where the air force disguised an Ancient code they were trying to crack as a puzzle in an mmorpg.


I thought it was an update of the plot device of the movie "Mercury Rising" (computer game puzzle  instead of paper puzzle). Nothing wrong with that, and the characters themselves are clearly nothing alike, but that element really reminded me of the movie.

/Enjoyed SG:U in general
 
2020-04-09 7:43:48 AM  
Great, more edutainment to convince idiots that they know more than they actually do. At least we may get another generation of flat-earthers and climate deniers out of it.
 
2020-04-09 7:55:29 AM  

duckpoopy: Great, more edutainment to convince idiots that they know more than they actually do. At least we may get another generation of flat-earthers and climate deniers out of it.


the minigame that does all the sciencing is a a simple puzzle matching game. all the science is done on the backend. There is no information to be gleaned at all from actually playing the game. Heck they could of put it in there without saying anything and no one would of known they were crowdsourcing. I doubt someone will say that because they played this minigame they can map DNA.
 
2020-04-09 8:12:26 AM  
My problem is that we still don't know that 'helping science' isn't just mining block chain with your GPU while you play Dr. Mario.
 
2020-04-09 11:27:33 AM  
If you want another game to help science, try Eyewire.  https://eyewire.org/explore​ You get to map mouse neurons to understand how they are connected in real life

And if you want less gamy sort of things, https://www.zooniverse.org/ has projects with everything from galaxy classification to transcribing old letters
 
2020-04-09 11:59:00 AM  
I've already done my part for science by becoming a bizarre mutant freak.
 
2020-04-09 12:12:29 PM  

duckpoopy: Great, more edutainment to convince idiots that they know more than they actually do. At least we may get another generation of flat-earthers and climate deniers out of it.


If you actually RTFA, the minigame generates puzzles based on protein folding, and solving these puzzles produces actually useful data that helps with genetic research into cures for all sorts of things. The problem is, to get enough of this data for the scientists that actually know how to use it to do so, a shiatload of people need to be doing the gruntwork. By making solving the puzzles into well... solving the puzzles, but as a videogame, the gruntwork gets done en masse, and the people doing the hard part get the data they need to run their experiments for basically free. This benefits everyone, as shiat gets cured faster.

The puzzle game is presented as simply a puzzle game, which you can play like a computer game without understanding the significance of what you're solving, or you can Google it, and find plenty of articles explaining the system and what it does and doesn't do. Foldit has been around for several years, BL3's just giving them a way to greatly expand their userbase.
 
2020-04-09 1:21:57 PM  

trerro: duckpoopy: Great, more edutainment to convince idiots that they know more than they actually do. At least we may get another generation of flat-earthers and climate deniers out of it.

If you actually RTFA, the minigame generates puzzles based on protein folding, and solving these puzzles produces actually useful data that helps with genetic research into cures for all sorts of things. The problem is, to get enough of this data for the scientists that actually know how to use it to do so, a shiatload of people need to be doing the gruntwork. By making solving the puzzles into well... solving the puzzles, but as a videogame, the gruntwork gets done en masse, and the people doing the hard part get the data they need to run their experiments for basically free. This benefits everyone, as shiat gets cured faster.

The puzzle game is presented as simply a puzzle game, which you can play like a computer game without understanding the significance of what you're solving, or you can Google it, and find plenty of articles explaining the system and what it does and doesn't do. Foldit has been around for several years, BL3's just giving them a way to greatly expand their userbase.


Foldit and Phylo have been around for almost a decade. Granted its not something my brain likes doing on the actual sites, so this may be better for it, but the real problem is the timesink involved

They need around 21 billion hours of time a week to solve things at a reasonable pace. I dont know if thats ever going to be possible
 
2020-04-09 1:27:40 PM  

Mabman: AntonChigger: I always liked the beginning of Stargate Universe where the air force disguised an Ancient code they were trying to crack as a puzzle in an mmorpg.



I thought it was an update of the plot device of the movie "Mercury Rising" (computer game puzzle  instead of paper puzzle). Nothing wrong with that, and the characters themselves are clearly nothing alike, but that element really reminded me of the movie.


/Enjoyed SG:U in general


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