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(The New York Times)   Is ordering all this takeout food during this coronavirus pandemic supporting restaurants or just endangering their workers?   (nytimes.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Take-out, Restaurant, Los Angeles County, California, Soup, Menu, Health care, Angeles National Forest, Fast food  
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526 clicks; posted to Business » and Food » on 08 Apr 2020 at 11:29 PM (14 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



45 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-04-08 5:48:34 PM  
Yes
 
2020-04-08 5:59:08 PM  
Endangering their workers? Lulz.

Not if you run a tight ship.
 
2020-04-08 6:08:34 PM  
Taco girl, oh taco girl....
 
2020-04-08 7:01:17 PM  
My neighbor started a very successful restaurant two years ago. He had to lay off most of his staff. He and his wife are chefs and they kept three other people on staff. They only do carry out orders. I recently refinished my bathroom and I had a few n-95 masks leftover from doing drywalling. I gave them to him to use. They are still all healthy, and hopefully COVID-19 free. With zero $ coming from the government at this point, they need any business they can get.
 
2020-04-08 7:16:59 PM  

cretinbob: Yes


Capitalism's a biatch ain't it?
 
2020-04-08 7:21:52 PM  
If the alternative is "the company gets zero business at all"?

They can stay safe and healthy and still do some business
 
2020-04-08 8:50:54 PM  
I make my own food because I am both cheap and scared to get sick.  Sorry, I didn't eat out much anyways so they don't miss me.
 
2020-04-08 8:56:19 PM  

The Googles Do Nothing: I make my own food because I am both cheap and scared to get sick.  Sorry, I didn't eat out much anyways so they don't miss me.


Not sure hot pockets are considered food.
 
2020-04-08 9:17:11 PM  
I have been ordering restaurant food but going to pick it up. We've been trying to stick to non-chain restaurants.  I go out twice a week for take-out food and tip as if we were eating there.

I get groceries delivered every 2 weeks from Peapod and whatever they don't bring (today was the delivery, no paper towels, no bread, no thermometer, no chicken, etc) I have to go out to find at BJs or worse, Walmart. Limits on everything means I have to keep going out to get more because we run out quicker.  Seems counter-intuitive.

Mr Spawn hasn't left the house in weeks, he sends me out in my sugar skull face mask.
 
2020-04-08 9:26:04 PM  
i.imgur.comView Full Size
 
2020-04-08 11:25:49 PM  
I have been working from home, so I haven't been eating out for lunch at all.
I hope the restaurants I used to frequent near my office are still there when things get back to normal, but things are looking bleak.

I am thinking of buying gift certificates from them so they can hopefully hang on, but that's risky for me.
 
2020-04-08 11:39:23 PM  

Spawn_of_Cthulhu: I have been ordering restaurant food but going to pick it up. We've been trying to stick to non-chain restaurants.  I go out twice a week for take-out food and tip as if we were eating there.

I get groceries delivered every 2 weeks from Peapod and whatever they don't bring (today was the delivery, no paper towels, no bread, no thermometer, no chicken, etc) I have to go out to find at BJs or worse, Walmart. Limits on everything means I have to keep going out to get more because we run out quicker.  Seems counter-intuitive.

Mr Spawn hasn't left the house in weeks, he sends me out in my sugar skull face mask.


Fark user imageView Full Size
We've been trying to give some business to our local, non-chain, places.  To that end, I made a "spinner" to help us choose.  Unlike the one in the photo, the restaurant version actually spins.  The one in the photo helps us keep track....
 
2020-04-08 11:53:05 PM  

lolmao500: Endangering their workers? Lulz.

Not if you run a tight ship.


"Lulz" is the opposite of a tight ship. Anyone who would use that syllable to describe anything does not understand what running a tight ship means.
 
2020-04-09 12:04:34 AM  
I work in a locally owned cheap counter service restaurant. We are strangely in a good spot for now. Fine dining places not so much. The last 4 weeks we've been on takeout only and limited hours. We are doing enough to pay for our shifts and getting nice tips. Fortunately we don't deliver and don't use delivery services. This is why we aren't at as much risk. Sure, we aren't making as much but we aren't dealing with too much business which translates to increased odds of exposure.

Next door is a major chain doing curbside pick up. They are having stupid crowds waiting out of their vehicles in the parking lot and not observing distancing. Some are pedestrians too. Those employees are at much more risk. Only yesterday did they start demanding customers stay in their cars after a month of increased risk.

/crossing my fingers
 
2020-04-09 12:06:50 AM  

Supadope: My neighbor started a very successful restaurant two years ago. He had to lay off most of his staff. He and his wife are chefs and they kept three other people on staff. They only do carry out orders. I recently refinished my bathroom and I had a few n-95 masks leftover from doing drywalling. I gave them to him to use. They are still all healthy, and hopefully COVID-19 free. With zero $ coming from the government at this point, they need any business they can get.


Just supported my neighborhood Thai place this evening.  They're using the emergency exit to provide one-way traffic for order pickup, with one customer allowed in at a time; far safer than a trip to the store.
 
2020-04-09 12:53:27 AM  
My favorite three local restaurants know me well enough to worry if I don't stop by at my usual intervals. As such, my conscience wouldn't allow me to add that worry on top of all of the worries caused by the current events...plus I am worried about them. I put on my face mask, order food+booze, tip well, and do my part to support them weekly while I can as this goes on.

Also, they make much better food than me, and I am thankful for their skills.

/I tried to make a greek moussaka last week
//...and I failed horribly.
///stupid bastard soup of a salt-lick and a lasagna gone wrong...I am just going to stick to sewing face masks in my spare time.
 
2020-04-09 1:02:40 AM  

The Googles Do Nothing: I make my own food because I am both cheap and scared to get sick.  Sorry, I didn't eat out much anyways so they don't miss me.


We ate out on special days, like birthdays and anniversaries, and maybe once every couple of months or so we'll go out to lunch just because.

But hubby has to leave the house to work, as he is considered essential (he works for a company making medical test kits so they are a little busy), but other than work and groceries, neither of us is interested in him taking any additional risk.

Plus, we don't know if the workers are okay. Of course, we never did, but this pandemic is a bit different, isn't it.

I feel bad for our favorite places, and some of them are still open and doing takeout, but we already are running risks with work and groceries, there's no need to add more. Besides, I'm an excellent cook and can cook anything my husband happens to find at the store. We've always eaten well in this house, which is maybe why we didn't go out much even before the virus.
 
2020-04-09 1:43:04 AM  
Those workers need their jobs.  Most of them live paycheck to paycheck.

Very few people I know who have been furloughed, or laid off, or had their hours reduced is happy about it.And, volunteering in alcohol and drug addiction recovery, I know quite a few.  They're very well represented in food service.
 
2020-04-09 1:50:58 AM  
I don't see how the risk is reduced much at all by using the drive thru or getting carry-out/delivery. You may not be coming into direct contact with other customers, but that drive thru or delivery person is. If the guy ahead of me is contagious and hands over his cash or card at the drive thru, the worker can easily pass that on to me when I pull up.
 
2020-04-09 2:29:29 AM  

ReapTheChaos: I don't see how the risk is reduced much at all by using the drive thru or getting carry-out/delivery. You may not be coming into direct contact with other customers, but that drive thru or delivery person is. If the guy ahead of me is contagious and hands over his cash or card at the drive thru, the worker can easily pass that on to me when I pull up.


Well usually you need a decent amount of exposure to catch a bug. Otherwise we'd get sick every time we breathed or ate something, we're constantly being bombarded by pathogens of all kinds.

I'd be interested to find out what concentration of this stuff is necessary to trigger an infection.
 
2020-04-09 2:36:39 AM  

ReapTheChaos: I don't see how the risk is reduced much at all by using the drive thru or getting carry-out/delivery. You may not be coming into direct contact with other customers, but that drive thru or delivery person is. If the guy ahead of me is contagious and hands over his cash or card at the drive thru, the worker can easily pass that on to me when I pull up.


There was a video that an RN posted about food safety and Fast Food joints.

The long and the short of it is, the virus does not like heat. His method of handling the food was to get it home, unfold the paper and 'flip' the burger onto a plate. Same with the fries. 

Said burger and fries was then popped into the microwave. You want the food hot enough so that it's steaming. Steaming hot = virus will be more than dead.

It turned out to be easier to deal with than groceries, where you have to deal with wiping down exterior containers, or carefully storing contents in tupperware.
 
2020-04-09 2:46:23 AM  

Znuh: ReapTheChaos: I don't see how the risk is reduced much at all by using the drive thru or getting carry-out/delivery. You may not be coming into direct contact with other customers, but that drive thru or delivery person is. If the guy ahead of me is contagious and hands over his cash or card at the drive thru, the worker can easily pass that on to me when I pull up.

There was a video that an RN posted about food safety and Fast Food joints.

The long and the short of it is, the virus does not like heat. His method of handling the food was to get it home, unfold the paper and 'flip' the burger onto a plate. Same with the fries. 

Said burger and fries was then popped into the microwave. You want the food hot enough so that it's steaming. Steaming hot = virus will be more than dead.

It turned out to be easier to deal with than groceries, where you have to deal with wiping down exterior containers, or carefully storing contents in tupperware.


I saw that.  TFA said he was a doctor iirc.  Yet he had McDonald's and Arby's.

I am not taking food advice from an MD that microwaves his Big Macs and Beef'n'Cheddars.

You want rubbery bread?  Microwave it.

For burgers and sandwiches, wrap it in foil and put it in the toaster oven when you get it home for a few minutes.  If it was cold, like from the fridge, you'll have to wrap the meat seperately and start it early because the bread will insulate the meat and you'll just get burnt bun and cold meat.

Same for french fries - wrap them separately, spritz 'em with some Pam, close tight and heat at 400 till you can hear 'em sizzle.  Then open the foil and let 'em crisp up a bit in the toaster oven.  This method can even revive days old fries that have been shriveling in the fridge.
 
2020-04-09 2:57:43 AM  

bughunter: Those workers need their jobs.  Most of them live paycheck to paycheck.

Very few people I know who have been furloughed, or laid off, or had their hours reduced is happy about it.And, volunteering in alcohol and drug addiction recovery, I know quite a few.  They're very well represented in food service.


Like I tell all the musicians who can't your the world anymore they I know, plenty of openings in healthcare.

Just you can't slack off anymore or give people your whiny bullshiat about how your mom has a cold so you can't come in.  Since as a burger cook, I spent all my energy 6 days a week to make $12 an hour with no tips.

Now I make $15/hr to work from 12-12:30, and 4:30-5, getting paid for 5, and playing games on my phone the rest of the time, because there's no competition for quadriplegic workers since everyone's an asshole.

I have no certificate or education, however I'm willing to listen and take orders by someone who knows their health, and while it isn't an 80k a year job, I'm barely working and making more.than I did giving myself a drinking poblem.

Then again years ago I realized it was better to take a paycut and a hit to quality of life (time off? LOL people don't die for a day) knowing I would always have work, even during a pandemic.

Something among the lines of preparing for the worst, hoping for the best.
 
2020-04-09 3:03:35 AM  

links136: bughunter: Those workers need their jobs.  Most of them live paycheck to paycheck.

Very few people I know who have been furloughed, or laid off, or had their hours reduced is happy about it.And, volunteering in alcohol and drug addiction recovery, I know quite a few.  They're very well represented in food service.

Like I tell all the musicians who can't your the world anymore they I know, plenty of openings in healthcare.


What the actual fark?

The topic is "are we endangering our food service workers" and your answer is, "let them work in hospitals."

I want some of what you're smoking.
 
2020-04-09 3:34:02 AM  

thurstonxhowell: lolmao500: Endangering their workers? Lulz.

Not if you run a tight ship.

"Lulz" is the opposite of a tight ship. Anyone who would use that syllable to describe anything does not understand what running a tight ship means.


User name sorta checks out.
 
2020-04-09 6:23:01 AM  
It is feeding your family
 
2020-04-09 6:47:51 AM  

Supadope: My neighbor started a very successful restaurant two years ago. He had to lay off most of his staff. He and his wife are chefs and they kept three other people on staff. They only do carry out orders. I recently refinished my bathroom and I had a few n-95 masks leftover from doing drywalling. I gave them to him to use. They are still all healthy, and hopefully COVID-19 free. With zero $ coming from the government at this point, they need any business they can get.


Family member runs a normally very successful restaurant that is now just barely able to squeak by on takeout/delivery (only 3 employees left plus kids of my family member helping out by cleaning pots/pans).  I try to order one meal a week to help but it is expensive relative to the impact of my family's cut hours.
 
2020-04-09 7:26:15 AM  

BolloxReader: ReapTheChaos: I don't see how the risk is reduced much at all by using the drive thru or getting carry-out/delivery. You may not be coming into direct contact with other customers, but that drive thru or delivery person is. If the guy ahead of me is contagious and hands over his cash or card at the drive thru, the worker can easily pass that on to me when I pull up.

Well usually you need a decent amount of exposure to catch a bug. Otherwise we'd get sick every time we breathed or ate something, we're constantly being bombarded by pathogens of all kinds.

I'd be interested to find out what concentration of this stuff is necessary to trigger an infection.


You need one bug.

Pathogens multiply themselves. So, they can start with one and turn you into their reproduction site.

You don't get sick with every breath because your immune system kills bad things it knows about. When a new virus comes in, it can attack your cells and reproduce. It takes a while for the immune system to recognize the new virus.

Toxins are the ones that you need a certain level before you can get sick.
 
2020-04-09 8:47:33 AM  
The government really should provide guidelines on how restaurants can safely operate takeout operations.

Some in my neighborhood are really doing it right: There's a designated spot in the outdoor seating area where people line up to get their food; orders are brought out one at a time and put on a table; when the restaurant worker goes back inside you then step up to the table. Throughout the whole interaction everyone maintains a 6+ foot buffer.

Then there are other places that have people coming inside the restaurant to get their order. WTF?

Side note: There are other businesses operating like takeout restaurants. My bike store is still open for repairs. They have a drop off spot in front of the shop where you leave your bike; you step back 10 feet and then someone from the store comes out to take the bike inside. And I assume it's pretty easy for the employees to maintain social distancing inside the store when working on bikes. I hope more stores can do something like this.
 
2020-04-09 10:33:29 AM  

BolloxReader: ReapTheChaos: I don't see how the risk is reduced much at all by using the drive thru or getting carry-out/delivery. You may not be coming into direct contact with other customers, but that drive thru or delivery person is. If the guy ahead of me is contagious and hands over his cash or card at the drive thru, the worker can easily pass that on to me when I pull up.

Well usually you need a decent amount of exposure to catch a bug. Otherwise we'd get sick every time we breathed or ate something, we're constantly being bombarded by pathogens of all kinds.

I'd be interested to find out what concentration of this stuff is necessary to trigger an infection.


I actually looked into this when this whole thing started up. You will be pleased/horrified to know it takes only a single viral particle to result in an infection.

That's right. You can become infected with exposure to a single virion. Sort of put into perspective just how infectious novel virus can be.
 
2020-04-09 11:07:41 AM  
I pull 3 shifts in a Mexican cafe, in Seattle, per week. I wear my own filtered mask. I'm constantly disinfecting surfaces after customers and food drivers come and go.  I do feel less safe while in the public air streams. I'm torn between working or staying home. I feel blessed to be able to help the business survive, knowing this storm will pass.
Times are scary, Yo.
 
2020-04-09 11:30:35 AM  

Vermithrax Perjorative: BolloxReader: ReapTheChaos: I don't see how the risk is reduced much at all by using the drive thru or getting carry-out/delivery. You may not be coming into direct contact with other customers, but that drive thru or delivery person is. If the guy ahead of me is contagious and hands over his cash or card at the drive thru, the worker can easily pass that on to me when I pull up.

Well usually you need a decent amount of exposure to catch a bug. Otherwise we'd get sick every time we breathed or ate something, we're constantly being bombarded by pathogens of all kinds.

I'd be interested to find out what concentration of this stuff is necessary to trigger an infection.

I actually looked into this when this whole thing started up. You will be pleased/horrified to know it takes only a single viral particle to result in an infection.

That's right. You can become infected with exposure to a single virion. Sort of put into perspective just how infectious novel virus can be.


The ID50 is a measure of the number of infectious particles (virion, bacteria, etc) necessary to cause infection in 50% of the exposed individuals.  It can be as low as 1, but there is often a range.  For norovirus, for example, 10 will lead to an infection with a small number of individuals, while 18 will cause the disease in 50%.

Persons with comprised immune systems are obviously more likely to develop COVID-19 with exposure to smaller numbers of virus particles.  That alone is a good reason to practice social distancing and other measures...to keep those people safe.  That seems to be especially important in light of the just-discovered (by Gov. Kemp!) fact that asymptomatic individuals can be contagious.
 
2020-04-09 12:32:22 PM  
Meh, a bit of both. I'm doing about 50/50 cook at home and order takeout, slightly more takeout than I was doing before. At work (before), I was eating at a restaurant nearly every day.

(shrug) I mean, restaurants aren't shutting down, so I'm continuing to purchase from them. If they don't want business, they wouldn't be open.
 
2020-04-09 1:27:10 PM  
https://www.seriouseats.com/2020/03/f​o​od-safety-and-coronavirus-a-comprehens​ive-guide.html

This is an article from J. Kenji Lopez-Alt detailing for the average restaurant goer just how the virus is likely to impact food service workers and customers.  While the data and science is constantly updating as we learn more about the virus Lopez-Alt is a well known and trusted name in food science and safety.  I suggest giving it a read for anyone who has concerns.  His writing has a good readable voice too, even for the dry sciencey bits.
 
2020-04-09 1:56:47 PM  

PictureAWave: https://www.seriouseats.com/2020/03/f​o​od-safety-and-coronavirus-a-comprehens​ive-guide.html

This is an article from J. Kenji Lopez-Alt detailing for the average restaurant goer just how the virus is likely to impact food service workers and customers.  While the data and science is constantly updating as we learn more about the virus Lopez-Alt is a well known and trusted name in food science and safety.  I suggest giving it a read for anyone who has concerns.  His writing has a good readable voice too, even for the dry sciencey bits.


"...well-known and trusted name in food science and safety..."
He's an architect for crissakes!

/I am still a fan
 
2020-04-09 2:02:05 PM  

Gough: PictureAWave: https://www.seriouseats.com/2020/03/fo​od-safety-and-coronavirus-a-comprehens​ive-guide.html

This is an article from J. Kenji Lopez-Alt detailing for the average restaurant goer just how the virus is likely to impact food service workers and customers.  While the data and science is constantly updating as we learn more about the virus Lopez-Alt is a well known and trusted name in food science and safety.  I suggest giving it a read for anyone who has concerns.  His writing has a good readable voice too, even for the dry sciencey bits.

"...well-known and trusted name in food science and safety..."
He's an architect for crissakes!

/I am still an idiot


Ftfy
 
2020-04-09 2:15:11 PM  

Gough: PictureAWave: https://www.seriouseats.com/2020/03/fo​od-safety-and-coronavirus-a-comprehens​ive-guide.html

This is an article from J. Kenji Lopez-Alt detailing for the average restaurant goer just how the virus is likely to impact food service workers and customers.  While the data and science is constantly updating as we learn more about the virus Lopez-Alt is a well known and trusted name in food science and safety.  I suggest giving it a read for anyone who has concerns.  His writing has a good readable voice too, even for the dry sciencey bits.

"...well-known and trusted name in food science and safety..."
He's an architect for crissakes!

/I am still a fan


I never claimed he was a scientist.

He was an architect and then went into food.  He's worked at Cook's Illustrated and his approach to food and cooking has always been scientific-method based.  Alton Brown started his life in film and cinematography but many people trust and appreciate his methodical approach to cooking.

Colonel Sanders is a trusted name in fried chicken but I wouldn't want him ordering my military around.

/all good!
 
2020-04-09 3:22:30 PM  

PictureAWave: Colonel Sanders is a trusted name in fried chicken but I wouldn't want him ordering my military around.


You want General Tso for that.
 
2020-04-09 3:22:34 PM  
We used to eat out most nights a week and I honestly don't miss it.
 
2020-04-09 3:22:57 PM  

PictureAWave: Gough: PictureAWave: https://www.seriouseats.com/2020/03/fo​od-safety-and-coronavirus-a-comprehens​ive-guide.html

This is an article from J. Kenji Lopez-Alt detailing for the average restaurant goer just how the virus is likely to impact food service workers and customers.  While the data and science is constantly updating as we learn more about the virus Lopez-Alt is a well known and trusted name in food science and safety.  I suggest giving it a read for anyone who has concerns.  His writing has a good readable voice too, even for the dry sciencey bits.

"...well-known and trusted name in food science and safety..."
He's an architect for crissakes!

/I am still a fan

I never claimed he was a scientist.

He was an architect and then went into food.  He's worked at Cook's Illustrated and his approach to food and cooking has always been scientific-method based.  Alton Brown started his life in film and cinematography but many people trust and appreciate his methodical approach to cooking.

Colonel Sanders is a trusted name in fried chicken but I wouldn't want him ordering my military around.

/all good!


I hope you and some others realize that my comment was ironic.  It would appears that not everyone did.

I still think the InterTubes needs an IRONIC font.
 
2020-04-09 5:37:46 PM  
Yeah, I got about halfway through my Angry Internet Typing before I caught on.  I fully agree about the internet ironic/sarcasm font.

/And seconded to the General Tso comment!
 
2020-04-09 5:53:06 PM  

Gough: Vermithrax Perjorative: BolloxReader: ReapTheChaos: I don't see how the risk is reduced much at all by using the drive thru or getting carry-out/delivery. You may not be coming into direct contact with other customers, but that drive thru or delivery person is. If the guy ahead of me is contagious and hands over his cash or card at the drive thru, the worker can easily pass that on to me when I pull up.

Well usually you need a decent amount of exposure to catch a bug. Otherwise we'd get sick every time we breathed or ate something, we're constantly being bombarded by pathogens of all kinds.

I'd be interested to find out what concentration of this stuff is necessary to trigger an infection.

I actually looked into this when this whole thing started up. You will be pleased/horrified to know it takes only a single viral particle to result in an infection.

That's right. You can become infected with exposure to a single virion. Sort of put into perspective just how infectious novel virus can be.

The ID50 is a measure of the number of infectious particles (virion, bacteria, etc) necessary to cause infection in 50% of the exposed individuals.  It can be as low as 1, but there is often a range.  For norovirus, for example, 10 will lead to an infection with a small number of individuals, while 18 will cause the disease in 50%.

Persons with comprised immune systems are obviously more likely to develop COVID-19 with exposure to smaller numbers of virus particles.  That alone is a good reason to practice social distancing and other measures...to keep those people safe.  That seems to be especially important in light of the just-discovered (by Gov. Kemp!) fact that asymptomatic individuals can be contagious.


Wait a minute! Are you trying to tell me that immunology is more complicated than I might have gathered from a little googling?

No, that can't be right... I've been on forums for a long time.
 
2020-04-09 6:11:23 PM  

Vermithrax Perjorative: Gough: Vermithrax Perjorative: BolloxReader: ReapTheChaos: I don't see how the risk is reduced much at all by using the drive thru or getting carry-out/delivery. You may not be coming into direct contact with other customers, but that drive thru or delivery person is. If the guy ahead of me is contagious and hands over his cash or card at the drive thru, the worker can easily pass that on to me when I pull up.

Well usually you need a decent amount of exposure to catch a bug. Otherwise we'd get sick every time we breathed or ate something, we're constantly being bombarded by pathogens of all kinds.

I'd be interested to find out what concentration of this stuff is necessary to trigger an infection.

I actually looked into this when this whole thing started up. You will be pleased/horrified to know it takes only a single viral particle to result in an infection.

That's right. You can become infected with exposure to a single virion. Sort of put into perspective just how infectious novel virus can be.

The ID50 is a measure of the number of infectious particles (virion, bacteria, etc) necessary to cause infection in 50% of the exposed individuals.  It can be as low as 1, but there is often a range.  For norovirus, for example, 10 will lead to an infection with a small number of individuals, while 18 will cause the disease in 50%.

Persons with comprised immune systems are obviously more likely to develop COVID-19 with exposure to smaller numbers of virus particles.  That alone is a good reason to practice social distancing and other measures...to keep those people safe.  That seems to be especially important in light of the just-discovered (by Gov. Kemp!) fact that asymptomatic individuals can be contagious.

Wait a minute! Are you trying to tell me that immunology is more complicated than I might have gathered from a little googling?

No, that can't be right... I've been on forums for a long time.


Hah.  I thought I knew a little bit about immunology, and then I started talking to my late father-in-law, a nationally known immunologist who taught MDs...holy shiat.
 
2020-04-10 2:45:12 AM  

Vermithrax Perjorative: BolloxReader: ReapTheChaos: I don't see how the risk is reduced much at all by using the drive thru or getting carry-out/delivery. You may not be coming into direct contact with other customers, but that drive thru or delivery person is. If the guy ahead of me is contagious and hands over his cash or card at the drive thru, the worker can easily pass that on to me when I pull up.

Well usually you need a decent amount of exposure to catch a bug. Otherwise we'd get sick every time we breathed or ate something, we're constantly being bombarded by pathogens of all kinds.

I'd be interested to find out what concentration of this stuff is necessary to trigger an infection.

I actually looked into this when this whole thing started up. You will be pleased/horrified to know it takes only a single viral particle to result in an infection.

That's right. You can become infected with exposure to a single virion. Sort of put into perspective just how infectious novel virus can be.


From what I understand, the viral load, the amount you are exposed to, has a big part in how well your immune system can develop antibodies and fight it off. Small load=like an immunization, and you develop immunity. large viral load=overwhelms immune system and patient dies.
 
2020-04-10 2:49:44 AM  
I seemed to have used the wrong terminology.  I should have said viral dose, not viral load...same principle applies however.
 
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