Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Fark and Schnitt)   If you hear the phrase "dipping your balls in corona virus" while listening to this week's episode of the Fark and Schnitt podcast, you're probably listening at 2x speed   (podcasts.apple.com) divider line
    More: PSA, Apple Inc., next flight, Apple Store, Internet, ways, hell, idiocy, APPLE  
•       •       •

4542 clicks; posted to Main » and Podcast » on 29 Jan 2020 at 2:15 PM (18 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



50 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-01-28 9:05:24 AM  
Woah. Yes.

/ Kansas City. Light switches were push-button, tub had feet.
 
2020-01-28 9:08:17 AM  
How many times does a "random" toilet need to be flushed?
Asking for a friend Trump...
 
2020-01-28 9:10:38 AM  
Which century?
 
2020-01-28 9:11:38 AM  
Its for pooping, silly.
 
2020-01-28 9:12:59 AM  

Doctor Poop: Its for pooping, silly.


Thanks, Doctor Poop.
 
2020-01-28 9:17:27 AM  
You mean a Pittsburgh Potty?
 
2020-01-28 9:18:16 AM  
i3.kym-cdn.comView Full Size
 
2020-01-28 9:21:56 AM  
Is phubbing like a fonging?
 
2020-01-28 9:23:36 AM  
Like, every one I've ever been in.  The house I grew up in (built around 1910) had a rando toilet behind the furnace.

Our current house (built in the mid 1950s) had a not-as-random toilet, which someone enclosed into a powder room (and which we have since removed and relocated).

The local story is that mill workers used to use them instead of traipsing through the house and getting everything dirty.
 
2020-01-28 9:24:04 AM  
When my grandparents built their house in the 50s, they didn't initially put interior walls in the basement, so there was a shower rough-in and a shiatter sitting in the open basement.
 
2020-01-28 9:27:26 AM  
i just poop in the shower.
 
2020-01-28 9:29:49 AM  
That's so when you finish the basement you knew exactly where the plumbing was and could plan accordingly. Actually quite helpful.
 
TWX [TotalFark]
2020-01-28 9:32:35 AM  

Claude the Dog: When my grandparents built their house in the 50s, they didn't initially put interior walls in the basement, so there was a shower rough-in and a shiatter sitting in the open basement.


My detached workshop has rough-in plumbng, but the fixtures were not installed.  So I have a plugged ~4" hole in the floor, a roughly 15" by 15" square gap in the slab with a ~2" pipe roughly centered, and a vent-stack rising up through the roof, with just a utility sink hooked up to the hot and cold water supplies, draining into a fitting on that vent stack.

Some day I plan to put that bathroom in, as it's annoying to have to get cleaned up to go into the house to use one in there when I'm out working.
 
2020-01-28 9:33:19 AM  
u misspelt 'reroute all copper lines 2 maximize efficiency to save money" wrong
 
2020-01-28 9:37:09 AM  
I have one of those in my basement. I call it the phone booth.

It's extremely useful when you come in during the winter/bad weather and don't want to take your boots off.
 
2020-01-28 9:44:42 AM  

CrazyCurt: Woah. Yes.

/ Kansas City. Light switches were push-button, tub had feet.


I still have push button lights. House was built in either 1904 or 1905. Unfortunately no weird basement toilet to speak of.
 
2020-01-28 9:44:59 AM  
It's a cheap overflow system mostly.
 
2020-01-28 9:48:30 AM  
Yes, mid-1920s home in Dayton, Ohio, had one, right by the basement stairs.  Scary spider-filled, toilet-booth, that no one used.
 
2020-01-28 9:52:58 AM  
Sometimes you just know that your upcoming BM is going to be a satanic poo-baby nightmare - therefore you want to be a little closer to hell (the basement) when birthing it.
 
2020-01-28 9:54:49 AM  

thismomentinblackhistory: I still have push button lights. House was built in either 1904 or 1905.


https://www.houseofantiquehardware.co​m​/premium-push-button-light-switch?sc=9​&category=34

They still make push button switches to modern code.
 
2020-01-28 10:06:33 AM  

thismomentinblackhistory: CrazyCurt: Woah. Yes.

/ Kansas City. Light switches were push-button, tub had feet.

I still have push button lights. House was built in either 1904 or 1905. Unfortunately no weird basement toilet to speak of.


I wish I had those light switches in my current house, which is a refurbished barn circa 1909. I didn't do any of the remodel, however, and am not planning on ripping out the current fixtures. Except maybe the kitchen cabinets. Anyway, the toilet is right where you'd expect it to be.
 
2020-01-28 10:10:06 AM  
Our 1910 Sears Roebuck catalog house in Cleveland had one, semi walled in.  It was a handy when I didn't want to destroy the only bathroom upstairs....

(go Browns! ---- no, the football kind)
 
2020-01-28 10:15:45 AM  
Native Marylander here. We had a toilet in our basement as described, but I was told it was supposed to be flushed when it was cold outside to keep the pipes from freezing .
 
2020-01-28 10:18:18 AM  

This text is now purple: thismomentinblackhistory: I still have push button lights. House was built in either 1904 or 1905.

https://www.houseofantiquehardware.com​/premium-push-button-light-switch?sc=9​&category=34

They still make push button switches to modern code.


Half of my house is still knob and tube that has never been spliced or otherwise modified. The advice I get from electricians is to leave it alone.
 
2020-01-28 10:20:30 AM  
CSB: I was smoking weed with people I didn't know in a Pennsyltucky base when I noticed a waist-high copper pipe sticking out of the floor. I asked the host what it was for. He said: "It's my pissin' pipe." I asked where it leads to. He said: "Hell of I know, but I been pissin' in it for 12 years with no problems."
 
2020-01-28 10:24:07 AM  
I remember when I was looking at houses this one had a toilet in the basement.  The basement was basically a big unfinished room.  in the middle of it was a square wooden decking platform and on top of the middle of that, a toilet (no sink near by).

It had a 360 degree curtain you could pull around it.  It was the oddest thing I've ever seen (the platform and toilet kind of reminded me of a lit up boxing ring in the middle of an arena.)

I don't think I'd feel comfortable using it.

/There was also a house we toured where getting to the basement required walking through the only full bathroom in the house. (there was a half bath upstairs)
//we didn't buy either house.
 
2020-01-28 10:28:00 AM  
Basement?

*googles*

People have rooms below the ground?!?! Like hobbits?
 
2020-01-28 10:36:39 AM  

akya: I remember when I was looking at houses this one had a toilet in the basement.  The basement was basically a big unfinished room.  in the middle of it was a square wooden decking platform and on top of the middle of that, a toilet (no sink near by).

It had a 360 degree curtain you could pull around it.  It was the oddest thing I've ever seen (the platform and toilet kind of reminded me of a lit up boxing ring in the middle of an arena.)

I don't think I'd feel comfortable using it.


/There was also a house we toured where getting to the basement required walking through the only full bathroom in the house. (there was a half bath upstairs)
//we didn't buy either house.



You could play the soundtrack to one of the Rocky training montages to psych yourself up for a massive dump.
 
2020-01-28 10:38:34 AM  
Ever been in a midcentury-built home with a random toilet in the basement?

See also "The Help" for other reasons why
 
2020-01-28 10:58:28 AM  

The Irresponsible Captain: You mean a Pittsburgh Potty?


Came to post this.

The house I grew up in, my grandparents' house and my other grandparent's foundation trailer all had basement toilets.  I thought this was normal until I went to college and was told otherwise.
 
2020-01-28 11:07:17 AM  

Sir Paul: Basement?

*googles*

People have rooms below the ground?!?! Like hobbits?


Yes, Virginia, basements really exist. In the aforementioned Kansas City, we get these things called tornadoes. Basements are the safest places to hide.
 
2020-01-28 11:08:11 AM  

akya: I remember when I was looking at houses this one had a toilet in the basement.  The basement was basically a big unfinished room.  in the middle of it was a square wooden decking platform and on top of the middle of that, a toilet (no sink near by).

It had a 360 degree curtain you could pull around it.  It was the oddest thing I've ever seen (the platform and toilet kind of reminded me of a lit up boxing ring in the middle of an arena.)

I don't think I'd feel comfortable using it.

/There was also a house we toured where getting to the basement required walking through the only full bathroom in the house. (there was a half bath upstairs)
//we didn't buy either house.


I thought everyone had a poop stage.
 
2020-01-28 11:19:14 AM  

CFitzsimmons: thismomentinblackhistory: CrazyCurt: Woah. Yes.

/ Kansas City. Light switches were push-button, tub had feet.

I still have push button lights. House was built in either 1904 or 1905. Unfortunately no weird basement toilet to speak of.

I wish I had those light switches in my current house, which is a refurbished barn circa 1909. I didn't do any of the remodel, however, and am not planning on ripping out the current fixtures. Except maybe the kitchen cabinets. Anyway, the toilet is right where you'd expect it to be.


A switch is like a $5 part and it's pretty easily wired. They are just screwed into the box in the wall.

If you're not comfortable, it's like an hour for an electrician to do as many as you need.
 
2020-01-28 11:21:31 AM  

thismomentinblackhistory: This text is now purple: thismomentinblackhistory: I still have push button lights. House was built in either 1904 or 1905.

https://www.houseofantiquehardware.com​/premium-push-button-light-switch?sc=9​&category=34

They still make push button switches to modern code.

Half of my house is still knob and tube that has never been spliced or otherwise modified. The advice I get from electricians is to leave it alone.


Well-done K&T is perfectly fine, except for three issues:

1. Parallel wires make fine antennae
2. It's ungrounded.
3. You can't insulate over the wires; they use dead-air space for cooling.

If anything, they are harder to short or over-heat than modern wiring is. There's a reason those lines are still in use 100 years later.
 
TWX [TotalFark]
2020-01-28 11:48:09 AM  

This text is now purple: thismomentinblackhistory: This text is now purple: thismomentinblackhistory: I still have push button lights. House was built in either 1904 or 1905.

https://www.houseofantiquehardware.com​/premium-push-button-light-switch?sc=9​&category=34

They still make push button switches to modern code.

Half of my house is still knob and tube that has never been spliced or otherwise modified. The advice I get from electricians is to leave it alone.

Well-done K&T is perfectly fine, except for three issues:

1. Parallel wires make fine antennae
2. It's ungrounded.
3. You can't insulate over the wires; they use dead-air space for cooling.

If anything, they are harder to short or over-heat than modern wiring is. There's a reason those lines are still in use 100 years later.


Except that you're trusting the structural integrity of the surfaces that the knobs are affixed-to.

In a perfect world we'd have a lot less nonmetallic and a lot more conduit.
 
TWX [TotalFark]
2020-01-28 11:49:39 AM  

akya: I remember when I was looking at houses this one had a toilet in the basement.  The basement was basically a big unfinished room.  in the middle of it was a square wooden decking platform and on top of the middle of that, a toilet (no sink near by).

It had a 360 degree curtain you could pull around it.  It was the oddest thing I've ever seen (the platform and toilet kind of reminded me of a lit up boxing ring in the middle of an arena.)

I don't think I'd feel comfortable using it.


Cataholic: I thought everyone had a poop stage.


Where was the toilet paper?
 
2020-01-28 11:52:07 AM  

FrancoFile: akya: I remember when I was looking at houses this one had a toilet in the basement.  The basement was basically a big unfinished room.  in the middle of it was a square wooden decking platform and on top of the middle of that, a toilet (no sink near by).

It had a 360 degree curtain you could pull around it.  It was the oddest thing I've ever seen (the platform and toilet kind of reminded me of a lit up boxing ring in the middle of an arena.)

I don't think I'd feel comfortable using it.

/There was also a house we toured where getting to the basement required walking through the only full bathroom in the house. (there was a half bath upstairs)
//we didn't buy either house.


You could play the soundtrack to one of the Rocky training montages to psych yourself up for a massive dump.


I think you may have a future in real estate.
 
2020-01-28 11:54:57 AM  

TWX: akya: I remember when I was looking at houses this one had a toilet in the basement.  The basement was basically a big unfinished room.  in the middle of it was a square wooden decking platform and on top of the middle of that, a toilet (no sink near by).

It had a 360 degree curtain you could pull around it.  It was the oddest thing I've ever seen (the platform and toilet kind of reminded me of a lit up boxing ring in the middle of an arena.)

I don't think I'd feel comfortable using it.

Cataholic: I thought everyone had a poop stage.

Where was the toilet paper?


It was on the ground next to it, in my case.
 
2020-01-28 12:27:18 PM  

TWX: This text is now purple: thismomentinblackhistory: This text is now purple: thismomentinblackhistory: I still have push button lights. House was built in either 1904 or 1905.

https://www.houseofantiquehardware.com​/premium-push-button-light-switch?sc=9​&category=34

They still make push button switches to modern code.

Half of my house is still knob and tube that has never been spliced or otherwise modified. The advice I get from electricians is to leave it alone.

Well-done K&T is perfectly fine, except for three issues:

1. Parallel wires make fine antennae
2. It's ungrounded.
3. You can't insulate over the wires; they use dead-air space for cooling.

If anything, they are harder to short or over-heat than modern wiring is. There's a reason those lines are still in use 100 years later.

Except that you're trusting the structural integrity of the surfaces that the knobs are affixed-to.

In a perfect world we'd have a lot less nonmetallic and a lot more conduit.


You already are. They are attached to the house's structural beams.
 
2020-01-28 2:48:06 PM  
One idea that comes to mind is that those were put there for the work men building the house to use before the advent of rental port-a-potties. They may have been a popular do-it-yourself idea, also, so you don't have to go up the stairs when working in your basement shop.

I am Brantgoose. Why be content with one hypothesis when a dozen will do just as well? Why say anything original when "I am Groot" will get a more certain and bigger laugh?
 
2020-01-28 4:53:28 PM  
I have a recurrent nightmare where I have to crap out in public and the only toilets available are like this.  Sometimes I think I found a private one but then a window will open and there will be several people watching (and smelling) me.
 
2020-01-28 6:30:04 PM  
No, but I did look at a 1920s house were they crammed a bathroom into the attic.  You couldn't sit up straight on the commode and you had to kneel to use the sink.

Also rented a house that had survived the 1906 SF quake and had been transported to Oakland.  Had rod and tube wiring.
 
2020-01-28 9:21:57 PM  

CFitzsimmons: thismomentinblackhistory: CrazyCurt: Woah. Yes.

/ Kansas City. Light switches were push-button, tub had feet.

I still have push button lights. House was built in either 1904 or 1905. Unfortunately no weird basement toilet to speak of.

I wish I had those light switches in my current house, which is a refurbished barn circa 1909. I didn't do any of the remodel, however, and am not planning on ripping out the current fixtures. Except maybe the kitchen cabinets. Anyway, the toilet is right where you'd expect it to be.


You can buy them. The guts are modern and UL listed. https://www.amazon.com/Classi​c-Mother-​Vintage-Lighting-Hardware/dp/B01M0XTET​1

They even come with a dimmer built in. The top botton spins. https://www.amazon.com/Premium​-Single-​Pole-Universal-Mother-Buttons/dp/B01IW​1YYBE
 
2020-01-29 1:35:30 PM  
Is this more Fark TV in podcast form?
 
2020-01-29 2:07:30 PM  

TenMilligramInch: Is this more Fark TV in podcast form?


I finally listened to one (this one) its not thaaatbad..


interesting filterpwn?  I really did put a space between the last 2 words above, tried it twice but keeps coming back as one word.
 
2020-01-29 2:36:21 PM  
WTF?

Do they change the headline every couple days to make us think there's been a new podcast?
 
2020-01-29 2:40:11 PM  

FrancoFile: WTF?

Do they change the headline every couple days to make us think there's been a new podcast?


It comes with a new hat.
 
2020-01-29 2:46:04 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


/obscure?
 
2020-01-29 3:30:00 PM  

Lettuce Pray: [Fark user image image 643x388]

/obscure?


Came here for this.  Not disappointed.
 
2020-01-29 5:08:35 PM  
what did they expect from buying a beer so devoid of flavor youre obligated to bury a cotrus wedge in it

/corona sux
 
Displayed 50 of 50 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter




In Other Media
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.