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(IMDB)   Stanley Kubrick discovered the number 42 before Douglas Adams, because The Shining proves Kubrick helped fake Apollo 11 and changed Room 217 to 237and made Scatman Crothers cry and the carpet was satellite dishes. After that this video gets confusing   (imdb.com) divider line
    More: Silly, Numbers, The Shining, Overlook Hotel  
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1009 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 09 Nov 2019 at 7:22 AM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2019-11-09 3:42:07 AM  
So next time I'm forced to watch Frozen...I can substitute The Shining instead? It'll be just like that time when I took my nephews-in-law to see Turbo (the snail racing movie) followed by sneaking into The Conjuring.

Fun times! :-D
 
2019-11-09 4:08:43 AM  
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2019-11-09 4:36:21 AM  

khatores: So next time I'm forced to watch Frozen...I can substitute The Shining instead? It'll be just like that time when I took my nephews-in-law to see Turbo (the snail racing movie) followed by sneaking into The Conjuring.

Fun times! :-D


Frozen and The Shining? I thought we were supposed to watch The Wizard of OZ with the sound off so we can see how it matches up perfectly to Dark Side of the Moon!
 
2019-11-09 6:49:59 AM  
5 seconds in:

" . . . or how many ways Kubrick hid obvious references to his involvement in filming the Apollo moon landing."

You're going to have to do better than screenshots of American Indian motifs (most of which symbolize misfortune, which is appropriate to the film and have nothing to do with the moon) and a sweater that was in the movie 2 years after the moon landing happened.

I do agree about the multiple takes, though. Kubrick was a perfectionist the to the point of being a huge pain in the ass. Most of his actors probably really WERE half crazy by the time Kubrick got the take he wanted.
 
2019-11-09 7:17:36 AM  

Sensei Can You See: khatores: So next time I'm forced to watch Frozen...I can substitute The Shining instead? It'll be just like that time when I took my nephews-in-law to see Turbo (the snail racing movie) followed by sneaking into The Conjuring.

Fun times! :-D

Frozen and The Shining? I thought we were supposed to watch The Wizard of OZ with the sound off so we can see how it matches up perfectly to Dark Side of the Moon!



Seriously.  And don't forget how Mike Oldfield's music, "Tubular Bells," matches so perfectly with the Exorcist  movie.  It's uncanny.
 
2019-11-09 8:00:58 AM  

NutWrench: 5 seconds in:

" . . . or how many ways Kubrick hid obvious references to his involvement in filming the Apollo moon landing."

You're going to have to do better than screenshots of American Indian motifs (most of which symbolize misfortune, which is appropriate to the film and have nothing to do with the moon) and a sweater that was in the movie 2 years after the moon landing happened.

I do agree about the multiple takes, though. Kubrick was a perfectionist the to the point of being a huge pain in the ass. Most of his actors probably really WERE half crazy by the time Kubrick got the take he wanted.


Especially Shelley Duvall.
 
2019-11-09 8:21:58 AM  
Just go watch Room 237.  That movie is absolutely insane.
 
2019-11-09 8:51:43 AM  
upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size
 
2019-11-09 9:25:13 AM  
Kubrick was indeed hired to fake the moon landings, but he was such a perfectionist that he insisted they film on location.
 
2019-11-09 9:30:10 AM  
I seem to be a little low on cash flow.

How's my credit in this establishment, Lloyd?
 
2019-11-09 9:35:05 AM  

MurphyMurphy: I seem to be a little low on cash flow.

How's my credit in this establishment, Lloyd?


Your credit's fine Mr. Torrance.
 
2019-11-09 9:35:34 AM  

Tyrone Slothrop: [upload.wikimedia.org image 220x325]


Netflix?
 
2019-11-09 11:35:47 AM  

John Buck 41: MurphyMurphy: I seem to be a little low on cash flow.

How's my credit in this establishment, Lloyd?

Your credit's fine Mr. Torrance.


In fact, your credit is so good, the Management has offered to extend its child-rearing expertise for the benefit of your son, Danny. May we have your permission to discipline the errant child, sir?
 
2019-11-09 12:14:22 PM  
Oh, I have it all figured out.  You see, 237 is a semi-prime number which tells us that it exists between many worlds.  Some numbers are "pure" prime numbers, like, say, 11.

OMG.  "Eleven" from Stranger Things is one of those scary chicks at the end of the hall in The Shining!  We're doomed.
 
2019-11-09 12:24:01 PM  
God damn it, Toast.
 
2019-11-09 1:19:52 PM  

Mad_Radhu: Kubrick was indeed hired to fake the moon landings, but he was such a perfectionist that he insisted they film on location.


That, my friends, is exactly how it happened. And to this day, because of Kubricks insistence for the on location filming, the fake moon landing is the most expensive film ever made.
 
2019-11-09 3:31:34 PM  

NeoCortex42: Just go watch Room 237.  That movie is absolutely insane.


This.  A 5-minute summary does not communicate the crazy that is in Room 237.  Also, some of the stuff in the movie is extremely interesting, like how the actual floor plan of the hotel can't possibly exist.  Room 237 has some weird, absurd stuff in it, but Kubrick was a perfectionist, so he would have made sure the hotel's physical layout was depicted correctly, if that's what he wanted to show.
 
2019-11-09 4:17:39 PM  

Taylor Mental: John Buck 41: MurphyMurphy: I seem to be a little low on cash flow.

How's my credit in this establishment, Lloyd?

Your credit's fine Mr. Torrance.

In fact, your credit is so good, the Management has offered to extend its child-rearing expertise for the benefit of your son, Danny. May we have your permission to discipline the errant child, sir?


"A momentary lapse of muscular control"
 
2019-11-09 5:57:39 PM  
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2019-11-09 6:16:31 PM  

cousin-merle: NeoCortex42: Just go watch Room 237.  That movie is absolutely insane.

This.  A 5-minute summary does not communicate the crazy that is in Room 237.  Also, some of the stuff in the movie is extremely interesting, like how the actual floor plan of the hotel can't possibly exist.  Room 237 has some weird, absurd stuff in it, but Kubrick was a perfectionist, so he would have made sure the hotel's physical layout was depicted correctly, if that's what he wanted to show.


I saw a video on Youtube, it involved another movie or tv show with kids in it, and it was about how while all the other kids were outside, one girl was by herself inside the home. This scene was at the beginning and audience members thought it was showing how she was isolated and not really part of the group. Then the director said no, what happened was she was unavailable to film the scene outside with the others, so they shot the interior scene with her later so they could show where her character was at that moment. There was no subtext there, it was just so the audience wouldn't wonder where the hell is the other girl? Not everything is planned or has deep meanings. Sometimes circumstances dictate what's in the movie or not.
 
2019-11-09 6:23:29 PM  

Birnone: cousin-merle: NeoCortex42: Just go watch Room 237.  That movie is absolutely insane.

This.  A 5-minute summary does not communicate the crazy that is in Room 237.  Also, some of the stuff in the movie is extremely interesting, like how the actual floor plan of the hotel can't possibly exist.  Room 237 has some weird, absurd stuff in it, but Kubrick was a perfectionist, so he would have made sure the hotel's physical layout was depicted correctly, if that's what he wanted to show.

I saw a video on Youtube, it involved another movie or tv show with kids in it, and it was about how while all the other kids were outside, one girl was by herself inside the home. This scene was at the beginning and audience members thought it was showing how she was isolated and not really part of the group. Then the director said no, what happened was she was unavailable to film the scene outside with the others, so they shot the interior scene with her later so they could show where her character was at that moment. There was no subtext there, it was just so the audience wouldn't wonder where the hell is the other girl? Not everything is planned or has deep meanings. Sometimes circumstances dictate what's in the movie or not.


Kubrick planned things out more than most any other director. While most of the conspiracy theory stuff is off the wall, most of the details like the layout of the hotel and set dressing would have been 100% intentional by him.
 
2019-11-09 6:27:17 PM  

Birnone: cousin-merle: NeoCortex42: Just go watch Room 237.  That movie is absolutely insane.

This.  A 5-minute summary does not communicate the crazy that is in Room 237.  Also, some of the stuff in the movie is extremely interesting, like how the actual floor plan of the hotel can't possibly exist.  Room 237 has some weird, absurd stuff in it, but Kubrick was a perfectionist, so he would have made sure the hotel's physical layout was depicted correctly, if that's what he wanted to show.

I saw a video on Youtube, it involved another movie or tv show with kids in it, and it was about how while all the other kids were outside, one girl was by herself inside the home. This scene was at the beginning and audience members thought it was showing how she was isolated and not really part of the group. Then the director said no, what happened was she was unavailable to film the scene outside with the others, so they shot the interior scene with her later so they could show where her character was at that moment. There was no subtext there, it was just so the audience wouldn't wonder where the hell is the other girl? Not everything is planned or has deep meanings. Sometimes circumstances dictate what's in the movie or not.


aka 'Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar'
 
2019-11-09 6:46:56 PM  

Birnone: cousin-merle: NeoCortex42: Just go watch Room 237.  That movie is absolutely insane.

This.  A 5-minute summary does not communicate the crazy that is in Room 237.  Also, some of the stuff in the movie is extremely interesting, like how the actual floor plan of the hotel can't possibly exist.  Room 237 has some weird, absurd stuff in it, but Kubrick was a perfectionist, so he would have made sure the hotel's physical layout was depicted correctly, if that's what he wanted to show.

I saw a video on Youtube, it involved another movie or tv show with kids in it, and it was about how while all the other kids were outside, one girl was by herself inside the home. This scene was at the beginning and audience members thought it was showing how she was isolated and not really part of the group. Then the director said no, what happened was she was unavailable to film the scene outside with the others, so they shot the interior scene with her later so they could show where her character was at that moment. There was no subtext there, it was just so the audience wouldn't wonder where the hell is the other girl? Not everything is planned or has deep meanings. Sometimes circumstances dictate what's in the movie or not.


Kubrick designed it intentionally.  The maps of the maze shown in the film also don't match the actual maze layout.  It's not a mistake.  The other stuff is mostly conspiracy theories, but the hotel is meant to be a character in and of itself, and it is meant to have impossible spaces and rooms that can't exist.  The segment about this stuff is the best part of the Room 237 doc because they actually show you how none of it actually makes sense.  It's meant to be off-putting, but not in a way that your brain immediately registers.
 
2019-11-09 7:20:07 PM  

John Buck 41: Taylor Mental: John Buck 41: MurphyMurphy: I seem to be a little low on cash flow.

How's my credit in this establishment, Lloyd?

Your credit's fine Mr. Torrance.

In fact, your credit is so good, the Management has offered to extend its child-rearing expertise for the benefit of your son, Danny. May we have your permission to discipline the errant child, sir?

"A momentary lapse of muscular control"


I'm often amazed with the pop-culture-schooled denizens of Fark who have no familiarity with the actual substance of books that became movies. It's almost as they have an aversion to reading more than one or two sentences on any given topic.
 
2019-11-09 8:30:17 PM  
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2019-11-09 8:37:19 PM  

Taylor Mental: John Buck 41: Taylor Mental: John Buck 41: MurphyMurphy: I seem to be a little low on cash flow.

How's my credit in this establishment, Lloyd?

Your credit's fine Mr. Torrance.

In fact, your credit is so good, the Management has offered to extend its child-rearing expertise for the benefit of your son, Danny. May we have your permission to discipline the errant child, sir?

"A momentary lapse of muscular control"

I'm often amazed with the pop-culture-schooled denizens of Fark who have no familiarity with the actual substance of books that became movies. It's almost as they have an aversion to reading more than one or two sentences on any given topic.


If this is directed at me, I have read the book. The movie is better, IMO. I also think it's easier to recall lines from a movie than from a novel. YMMV.
 
2019-11-09 8:40:57 PM  

Taylor Mental: John Buck 41: Taylor Mental: John Buck 41: MurphyMurphy: I seem to be a little low on cash flow.

How's my credit in this establishment, Lloyd?

Your credit's fine Mr. Torrance.

In fact, your credit is so good, the Management has offered to extend its child-rearing expertise for the benefit of your son, Danny. May we have your permission to discipline the errant child, sir?

"A momentary lapse of muscular control"

I'm often amazed with the pop-culture-schooled denizens of Fark who have no familiarity with the actual substance of books that became movies. It's almost as they have an aversion to reading more than one or two sentences on any given topic.


tl:dr
 
2019-11-09 9:38:13 PM  

John Buck 41: Taylor Mental: John Buck 41: Taylor Mental: John Buck 41: MurphyMurphy: I seem to be a little low on cash flow.

How's my credit in this establishment, Lloyd?

Your credit's fine Mr. Torrance.

In fact, your credit is so good, the Management has offered to extend its child-rearing expertise for the benefit of your son, Danny. May we have your permission to discipline the errant child, sir?

"A momentary lapse of muscular control"

I'm often amazed with the pop-culture-schooled denizens of Fark who have no familiarity with the actual substance of books that became movies. It's almost as they have an aversion to reading more than one or two sentences on any given topic.

If this is directed at me, I have read the book. The movie is better, IMO. I also think it's easier to recall lines from a movie than from a novel. YMMV.


Your comment was what prompted me to carry on the narrative you initiated.

The heart of the story is how the little kid with super hero, clairvoyant (a formulaic staple in most King novels) ability threatens apparent ghosts from the 1920s Prohibition "speakeasy" Era inhabiting an old hotel when his washed up, alcoholic father has a lapse and falls off the wagon while supposedly being isolated from booze on a blizzard-bound mountain.

The movie makes it out like some ghosts showed up and brought the booze to Mr. Torrance. But the book tells an entirely different story - that he lost his mind from social isolation and mental stress psychosis brought on by the demands of his job and being locked up with a wife and kid he really didn't want.
 
2019-11-09 11:09:37 PM  

Taylor Mental: The heart of the story is how the little kid with super hero, clairvoyant (a formulaic staple in most King novels) ability threatens apparent ghosts from the 1920s Prohibition "speakeasy" Era inhabiting an old hotel when his washed up, alcoholic father has a lapse and falls off the wagon while supposedly being isolated from booze on a blizzard-bound mountain.

The movie makes it out like some ghosts showed up and brought the booze to Mr. Torrance. But the book tells an entirely different story - that he lost his mind from social isolation and mental stress psychosis brought on by the demands of his job and being locked up with a wife and kid he really didn't want.


I get all those points from the movie, which as I said, is more entertaining than the novel, no matter what Stephen King thinks.
 
2019-11-10 2:06:53 AM  
Taylor Mental:The heart of the story is how the little kid with super hero, clairvoyant (a formulaic staple in most King novels) ability threatens apparent ghosts from the 1920s Prohibition "speakeasy" Era inhabiting an old hotel when his washed up, alcoholic father has a lapse and falls off the wagon while supposedly being isolated from booze on a blizzard-bound mountain.

The movie makes it out like some ghosts showed up and brought the booze to Mr. Torrance. But the book tells an entirely different story - that he lost his mind from social isolation and mental stress psychosis brought on by the demands of his job and being locked up with a wife and kid he really didn't want.


It's been a long while since I read the book but I don't remember it that way. I remember the book and movie being in agreement on one important point. Danny's shining ability is what powers the hotel. He's like a battery that allows the hotel's ghosts to become active and visible even to Jack and Wendy. Hallorann's conversation with Danny in both the book and movie are about this specific thing. It's why Hallorann tells Danny to call if he needs help, Hallorann knows the hotel is going to be very active because he knows Danny has a lot of power. What Hallorann doesn't know is just how powerful Danny really is and the impact that's going to have in making the hotel even more powerful than ever. Jack did not lose his mind, he got taken over by the hotel. He's not crazy and acting independently albeit insanely independent. He's a puppet on a string.
 
2019-11-10 4:00:26 AM  

Taylor Mental: The movie makes it out like some ghosts showed up and brought the booze to Mr. Torrance. But the book tells an entirely different story - that he lost his mind from social isolation and mental stress psychosis brought on by the demands of his job and being locked up with a wife and kid he really didn't want.


Birnone: It's been a long while since I read the book but I don't remember it that way. I remember the book and movie being in agreement on one important point. Danny's shining ability is what powers the hotel.


The only way to settle this is a Fark bookclub discussion thread.  Every week we'll read a chapter and watch ten minutes of the movie, then minutely dissect and compare every little aspect so we can get to the bottom once and for all.
 
2019-11-10 4:24:53 AM  
All I know is, Shelly Duvall gave the most underrated performance of all time. Fark likes to tag her as a screaming dishrag, but then again Fark needs to shut the hell up and get laid.
 
2019-11-10 10:43:33 AM  

Slappy Longballs: All I know is, Shelly Duvall gave the most underrated performance of all time. Fark likes to tag her as a screaming dishrag, but then again Fark needs to shut the hell up and get laid.


User name May or may not check out.
 
2019-11-10 2:34:49 PM  

DrunkenBob: Taylor Mental: The movie makes it out like some ghosts showed up and brought the booze to Mr. Torrance. But the book tells an entirely different story - that he lost his mind from social isolation and mental stress psychosis brought on by the demands of his job and being locked up with a wife and kid he really didn't want.

Birnone: It's been a long while since I read the book but I don't remember it that way. I remember the book and movie being in agreement on one important point. Danny's shining ability is what powers the hotel.

The only way to settle this is a Fark bookclub discussion thread.  Every week we'll read a chapter and watch ten minutes of the movie, then minutely dissect and compare every little aspect so we can get to the bottom once and for all.


I'd be down for that. But I'm not necessarily going to argue against Birnone's take on the book because the reader could plausibly come away with either the haunted hotel or psychotic cabin fever theory. And I'm not even sure I want to read that book again. It gave me horrible nightmares for years that didn't get fully resolved until I had some therapy. 

Would make a great discussion thread though. I'll keep an out for it.
 
2019-11-10 3:44:10 PM  

Birnone: Taylor Mental:The heart of the story is how the little kid with super hero, clairvoyant (a formulaic staple in most King novels) ability threatens apparent ghosts from the 1920s Prohibition "speakeasy" Era inhabiting an old hotel when his washed up, alcoholic father has a lapse and falls off the wagon while supposedly being isolated from booze on a blizzard-bound mountain.

The movie makes it out like some ghosts showed up and brought the booze to Mr. Torrance. But the book tells an entirely different story - that he lost his mind from social isolation and mental stress psychosis brought on by the demands of his job and being locked up with a wife and kid he really didn't want.

It's been a long while since I read the book but I don't remember it that way. I remember the book and movie being in agreement on one important point. Danny's shining ability is what powers the hotel. He's like a battery that allows the hotel's ghosts to become active and visible even to Jack and Wendy. Hallorann's conversation with Danny in both the book and movie are about this specific thing. It's why Hallorann tells Danny to call if he needs help, Hallorann knows the hotel is going to be very active because he knows Danny has a lot of power. What Hallorann doesn't know is just how powerful Danny really is and the impact that's going to have in making the hotel even more powerful than ever. Jack did not lose his mind, he got taken over by the hotel. He's not crazy and acting independently albeit insanely independent. He's a puppet on a string.


I always saw it as a little bit of both, personally.  Was he a puppet?  Sure.  But it seemed to be because they'd turned all the dials he already had in him up to 11.  I.e. he was at worst neurotic and kinda messed up to start, but the hotel played that like a violin to produce a well trained attack dog.  He was a puppet, but not a shell or a sock puppet.  A lot of that was him, just exagerrated and refined by the hotel's 'help."

/as usual, WTF do I know so YMMV.  Just what I got from the book and the movie
 
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