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(Phys Org2)   Online gamers provide real-world lessons in critical teamwork and the power of mountain dew, cheetos, and LEEEEEROOOY JEEEENNNKIIINS   (phys.org) divider line
    More: Interesting, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, high costs of data collection, understanding team dynamics, Recent work, League of Legends, David Mendonca, large number of research subjects, members of the military  
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463 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 Nov 2019 at 6:24 AM (11 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



10 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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Juc
2019-11-06 09:40:31 AM  
Teabagging has never really shown itself to be a useful skill ... aside from when making a drink for the office racist.
 
2019-11-06 09:55:09 AM  
Recent work by researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is demonstrating how data from online games can help provide meaningful insights.

Thank goodness we have brilliant academics who have uncovered something a twelve-year-old can figure out by simply playing the game.
 
2019-11-06 10:09:36 AM  

Mike_LowELL: Thank goodness we have brilliant academics who have uncovered something a twelve-year-old can figure out by simply playing the game.


It's more about trying to sell the idea to non-gamers. Gamers read this stuff and say "Yeah, we know". But people who don't play don't see the point, and most don't see any redeeming value. Spontaneous teamwork, acts of random kindness, breaking down social hierarchies--as well as all the negative stuff we hear about--are not unusual in online games.

CSB:
Playing Destiny 2 where you had to turn stuff in to a vendor in the game. The vendor could handle multiple transactions at once, you just walk up and do your thing. For some reason, people started getting in line. The line had 20 people in it, just waiting their turn. When someone would jump the queue, there was good-natured "correction" until that person went to the end of the line, which they did. People waited 20 minutes to take their turn. Not because it was a game limitation, but because that construct occurred spontaneously. While not particularly useful, it's an interesting example of emergent gameplay. Players would have been furious if the game implemented this mechanic. Yet, when developed organically, players were happy to play the part and indulge the illusion.
 
2019-11-06 10:32:28 AM  

RobotSpider: Mike_LowELL: Thank goodness we have brilliant academics who have uncovered something a twelve-year-old can figure out by simply playing the game.

It's more about trying to sell the idea to non-gamers. Gamers read this stuff and say "Yeah, we know". But people who don't play don't see the point, and most don't see any redeeming value. Spontaneous teamwork, acts of random kindness, breaking down social hierarchies--as well as all the negative stuff we hear about--are not unusual in online games.

CSB:
Playing Destiny 2 where you had to turn stuff in to a vendor in the game. The vendor could handle multiple transactions at once, you just walk up and do your thing. For some reason, people started getting in line. The line had 20 people in it, just waiting their turn. When someone would jump the queue, there was good-natured "correction" until that person went to the end of the line, which they did. People waited 20 minutes to take their turn. Not because it was a game limitation, but because that construct occurred spontaneously. While not particularly useful, it's an interesting example of emergent gameplay. Players would have been furious if the game implemented this mechanic. Yet, when developed organically, players were happy to play the part and indulge the illusion.


You are absolutely correct, and it's kind of how someone woke up in the morning and came up with the concept of an "educational game" to con the educators who only think a videogame can be educational if George Washington is performing the quick-time event to rip out the whites of their eyes.

Which is to say the people who don't understand videogames as simulated reality reduced to scale are probably never going to get it, anyway, they won't ever understand the way that rules and systems can lead to both subtle and profound shifts in human behavior.

They will continue to be our loudest and most belligerent in the Politics Tab, the kind of person who is too stupid to understand how the rules and systems of society created the hilarious timeline we are in.  I wish them the best of luck.
 
2019-11-06 10:37:27 AM  
Only thing I learned from online gaming is the full extent of toxicity.
 
2019-11-06 12:42:04 PM  
FTA: "Kuramochi is also one of the most prolific contributors to swimsuit model selfie site Jigadoribu, which we previously covered in its capacity as a resource for studying the Japanese language."


Right.
 
2019-11-06 01:09:54 PM  

Rambino: Only thing I learned from online gaming is the full extent of toxicity.


welcome to fark?
 
2019-11-06 01:29:34 PM  

elvisaintdead: Rambino: Only thing I learned from online gaming is the full extent of toxicity.

welcome to fark?


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2019-11-06 04:49:26 PM  

Mike_LowELL: Recent work by researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is demonstrating how data from online games can help provide meaningful insights.

Thank goodness we have brilliant academics who have uncovered something a twelve-year-old can figure out by simply playing the game.


Hell it's one reason I finally decided to lay off WoW.  One of many, but it was high on the list.  Raids were starting to require so much safety dancing, repositioning, juggling maguffins, and flat out WTF why even? padding - that shiat got old.  I get that they aren't all going to be walk up and press auto-attack, nor would I want them to be - but some of them turned into more of an exercise in time management and rhythm-game cha-chaing around an arena than they did actual fights.  Just... no - enough already.
 
2019-11-06 08:06:26 PM  

Ambitwistor: elvisaintdead: Rambino: Only thing I learned from online gaming is the full extent of toxicity.

welcome to fark?

[Fark user image 220x150]


I rest my case.
 
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