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(Spokesman Review)   Man attempts to fly experimental aircraft. Since you're reading about it on Fark, you can pretty much guess how it all ended   (spokesman.com) divider line
    More: Scary, Air safety, National Transportation Safety Board, Federal Aviation Administration, small experimental aircraft, ultralight-type aircraft, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Transport, serious injuries  
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4974 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Oct 2019 at 5:38 AM (18 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2019-10-12 05:46:41 AM  
James Taylor style?
 
2019-10-12 05:52:18 AM  
FTFA: "Witnesses said the crash occurred as the aircraft was attempting to take off"

Perhaps, just perhaps, it is most generous to consider any craft of the air whence upon closer inspection it did not escape the ground.

But that's just like my opinion, man.
 
2019-10-12 05:57:25 AM  
That it ended with UFIA?
 
2019-10-12 06:08:42 AM  
They never did find all the parts of John Denver, when he crashed his experimental plane off the coast. But the FAA made the plane manufacturer move the fuel switch, so that's good.
 
2019-10-12 06:09:54 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2019-10-12 06:14:25 AM  
Is / was that an autogyro in TFA's photo?
 
2019-10-12 06:16:46 AM  
It's Idaho. They probably threw rocks at the aircraft thinking it was a demon.
 
2019-10-12 06:17:36 AM  
"Witnesses said the crash occurred as the aircraft was attempting to take off "

Then it's just a craft isn't it?
 
2019-10-12 06:40:35 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2019-10-12 07:23:11 AM  
Far Out Man
What's happening in this thread?
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2019-10-12 07:25:34 AM  

melalton: Is / was that an autogyro in TFA's photo?


article mentioned Ultralight.

He ain't no Chuck Yeager.

/who apparently is 96 now
//good on you, man.
 
2019-10-12 07:30:04 AM  
Peter Sripol?
 
2019-10-12 07:37:05 AM  
He fixes the cable?
 
2019-10-12 08:15:22 AM  
Landing is not much better.
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2019-10-12 08:19:27 AM  
Suddenly.
 
2019-10-12 08:34:23 AM  
If it was in Couer d'Alene, there was probably nothing much to hit anyway.

/been there
//never get in an "aircraft" that has "experimental" in the name
|/__crashed slashes!
 
2019-10-12 08:38:42 AM  
He didn't fix the cables?
 
2019-10-12 08:43:28 AM  
media.giphy.comView Full Size


What he planned to do
 
2019-10-12 08:47:34 AM  

Pointy Tail of Satan: They never did find all the parts of John Denver, when he crashed his experimental plane off the coast. But the FAA made the plane manufacturer move the fuel switch, so that's good.


To be specific Denver's plane was a kit. There is no manufacturer. Each builder can put the fuel valve anywhere they want.   There are no regulations.  In that plane the location was bad for Denver. The previous owner had no problem but John couldn't reach it so they put a small vice grip pliers on the valve.  Even that would have worked but he took off with it in the closed position  (or in the half closed position) and could not remedy the problem quickly enough.
 
2019-10-12 08:57:58 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


The ghost of Henry Smolinski strikes again.
 
2019-10-12 09:04:31 AM  

Nocrash: Pointy Tail of Satan: They never did find all the parts of John Denver, when he crashed his experimental plane off the coast. But the FAA made the plane manufacturer move the fuel switch, so that's good.

To be specific Denver's plane was a kit. There is no manufacturer. Each builder can put the fuel valve anywhere they want.   There are no regulations.  In that plane the location was bad for Denver. The previous owner had no problem but John couldn't reach it so they put a small vice grip pliers on the valve.  Even that would have worked but he took off with it in the closed position  (or in the half closed position) and could not remedy the problem quickly enough.


It didn't even have a handle. The vice grips were the handle. He didn't top up the fuel tanks or even check them for that matter. He had been caught flying drunk so he wasn't even licensed. He basically did everything wrong all in one go so that it would fit on one page in every flying instruction textbook.
 
2019-10-12 09:05:02 AM  

melalton: Is / was that an autogyro in TFA's photo?


It looks more like a powered hang glider type deal

Fark user imageView Full Size


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2019-10-12 09:08:33 AM  

Nocrash: There are no regulations.


That is not true.

Experimental aircraft have to meet basic airworthiness standards. They are inspected by the FAA or a designated representative prior to the issuance of an airworthiness certificate.
 
2019-10-12 09:20:09 AM  

edmo: Nocrash: There are no regulations.

That is not true.

Experimental aircraft have to meet basic airworthiness standards. They are inspected by the FAA or a designated representative prior to the issuance of an airworthiness certificate.


Point taken, but every DAR can make his own determination.  I have seen some amazing details that passed inspection.  Denver's plane passed inspection. Yes I think that is a weight shift trike in the crash photo.  There are only one or two brands that have that type of main gear. I fly those things and most all are factory built. I take my biennial in the Airborne brand shown in the stock photo. God I love flying those things.
 
2019-10-12 09:23:24 AM  
The sculpture teacher at my college had designed and built his own glider. He had an FAA inspection that was going great, approval was coming this afternoon, and everything looks top notch until the inspector got to the question, "Where did you get your engineering degree?" "I don't have one. I'm a sculpture teacher." immediately turned his insta-approval into a six month deep dive into his plans until they grudgingly admitted it was flight worthy as nd granted their approval. He's probably dead now, but not because his glider crashed.
 
2019-10-12 09:55:50 AM  
Figured as much.
 
2019-10-12 10:22:02 AM  
Poking around it is a 2-seat N-numbered Antares trike over 10 years old owned by a student pilot from Spokane WA who crashed on takeoff.
 
2019-10-12 10:27:36 AM  
If you ever happen to see this logo, back away, turn and run like hell. They're not normal.
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2019-10-12 10:32:31 AM  
Here's a fellow I know from New Jersey with his homemade experimental balloon. Yes, the basket is a plastic trash can.
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2019-10-12 10:54:09 AM  

melalton: Is / was that an autogyro in TFA's photo?


Hard to tell, but quite possible.

CSB: While taking glider lessons in the early 1990s, someone else showed up at the airport with an ultralight autogyro. He pulled back on the stick before he had sufficient takeoff speed, and went tumbling. Amazingly, he was uninjured.

My own aviation ambitions ended with a scary-but-harmless crosswind landing in the glider that was enough to make me nope out.
 
2019-10-12 10:55:04 AM  

MBooda: Here's a fellow I know from New Jersey with his homemade experimental balloon. Yes, the basket is a plastic trash can.
[Fark user image 480x640]


Is the guy standing to the left the balloon holder or the beer holder?
 
2019-10-12 10:55:12 AM  

gnosis301: That it ended with UFIA?


More like UFIAF
Ultralight Found In A Field
 
2019-10-12 11:01:14 AM  

MBooda: Here's a fellow I know from New Jersey with his homemade experimental balloon. Yes, the basket is a plastic trash can.
[Fark user image 480x640]


There was an even scarier homemade balloon that was used to escape from East Germany in 1979. Yeah, let's pile two whole families into an improvised hot-air balloon for a nighttime flight, why don't we? I'm surprised the weight of the two husbands' ginormous balls of steel didn't keep it from lifting off in the first place.
 
2019-10-12 11:26:12 AM  
Huh, I figured the article would have been about this guy.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2019-10-12 11:49:23 AM  

Snargi: MBooda: Here's a fellow I know from New Jersey with his homemade experimental balloon. Yes, the basket is a plastic trash can.
[Fark user image 480x640]

Is the guy standing to the left the balloon holder or the beer holder?


There's a difference?
 
2019-10-12 12:22:37 PM  

MBooda: If you ever happen to see this logo, back away, turn and run like hell. They're not normal.
[Fark user image image 210x131]


Be very careful. The next thing you know you will want to buy or build an airplane.  Just ask the 200,000 already addicted.

Listen: horses are worse. I have both. The horses eat every day even if you don't use them.
 
2019-10-12 12:25:59 PM  

Snarfangel: Landing is not much better.
[Fark user image 316x226]


lol I wonder what the game plan was there.

"now at the precise moment we jump to the wings and off we go. Stand firm, Frank. Frank, STAND FIRM!"
 
2019-10-12 12:36:53 PM  

edmo: melalton: Is / was that an autogyro in TFA's photo?

It looks more like a powered hang glider type deal

[Fark user image 850x359]

[Fark user image 629x411]


FTFA:
The ultralight-type aircraft crashed at about 5 p.m. and a man was trapped inside

"Inside"?
 
2019-10-12 12:38:17 PM  

MBooda: Here's a fellow I know from New Jersey with his homemade experimental balloon. Yes, the basket is a plastic trash can.
[Fark user image image 480x640]


He has a basket? Wow. Everyone really digs the one-man UL balloons they tether at EAA.  A sling seat with a 5 gallon propane BBQ tank on your back, or a slightly larger tank you straddle with a pad.  Looks uncomfortable to me.  No balloon license required but I've heard the really small balloons are trickier to fly.  Flight Instruction in a large balloon is advisable and difficult to obtain.
 
2019-10-12 12:43:37 PM  

edmo: Nocrash: There are no regulations.

That is not true.

Experimental aircraft have to meet basic airworthiness standards. They are inspected by the FAA or a designated representative prior to the issuance of an airworthiness certificate.


How can you convince an inspector of the airworthiness of a truly experimental aircraft?

"I can't approve this piece of *&%$#.  It ain't got no propeller."
"It doesn't need one.  It's a jet."
"A what?"

And the first helicopter must have looked like a practical joke...
 
2019-10-12 12:46:44 PM  

MBooda: Snargi: MBooda: Here's a fellow I know from New Jersey with his homemade experimental balloon. Yes, the basket is a plastic trash can.
[Fark user image 480x640]

Is the guy standing to the left the balloon holder or the beer holder?

There's a difference?


Thanks Martin I finally read your bio and also understand the humor better. I would love to fly a small balloon from my farm out on the midwest prairie and have wife follow and pick me up. Either that or I will just stay on a tether.
 
2019-10-12 01:10:50 PM  

flondrix: edmo: Nocrash: There are no regulations.

That is not true.

Experimental aircraft have to meet basic airworthiness standards. They are inspected by the FAA or a designated representative prior to the issuance of an airworthiness certificate.

How can you convince an inspector of the airworthiness of a truly experimental aircraft?

"I can't approve this piece of *&%$#.  It ain't got no propeller."
"It doesn't need one.  It's a jet."
"A what?"

And the first helicopter must have looked like a practical joke...


The inspector does not strictly make an assessment of whether it will fly or not.  You could register and have inspected any aircraft powered by your own engine of any type.  The inspector says it appears to be in a safe condition for flight and now you can begin testing.  Most want to hear and see the engine actually run. I've seen a couple cases where that was not required.  They check hardware, construction, controls, fuel system, instruments, seat belts, and paperwork. They check your weight and balance calculations but never weigh the airplane again.  This led to a 30 second flight and fatal crash once when the builder seriously messed up the weighing. When people say "It was inpected by the FAA", it doesn't mean what they think it does.

Experimentals generally require 40 hours of solo flying before taking up a passenger.
 
2019-10-12 01:14:04 PM  
*inspected*
 
2019-10-12 01:23:26 PM  
Nocrash:Thanks Martin I finally read your bio and also understand the humor better. I would love to fly a small balloon from my farm out on the midwest prairie and have wife follow and pick me up. Either that or I will just stay on a tether.

I haven't flown at Indianola yet, but when I do I'll let you know.
 
2019-10-12 02:04:17 PM  

swamp_of_dumb: The sculpture teacher at my college had designed and built his own glider. He had an FAA inspection that was going great, approval was coming this afternoon, and everything looks top notch until the inspector got to the question, "Where did you get your engineering degree?" "I don't have one. I'm a sculpture teacher." immediately turned his insta-approval into a six month deep dive into his plans until they grudgingly admitted it was flight worthy as nd granted their approval. He's probably dead now, but not because his glider crashed.


Sculpted to death?
 
2019-10-12 03:49:02 PM  

flondrix: edmo: melalton: Is / was that an autogyro in TFA's photo?

It looks more like a powered hang glider type deal

[Fark user image 850x359]

[Fark user image 629x411]

FTFA:
The ultralight-type aircraft crashed at about 5 p.m. and a man was trapped inside

"Inside"?


Maybe parts of it were inside *him*, from the looks of it.  But between the prop in your face and guy wires all around, I'm thinking crashing those things isn't a treasured activity.

Also looks like it may have flipped in a cross-wind gust.  The picture puts the crash right about here on rwy 2 at KCOE:

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2019-10-12 05:51:28 PM  
What I recall from my flight training...ultralights flying in and out of COE are to use the smaller runway (2/20), since 5/24 is the "main" runway for scheduled airlines to operate from.

There's also no control tower...pilots have to be extra wary of traffic in/near the airspace and ground.

I once had grand aspirations of flying to COE on a weekend, and taking my now-ex girlfriend for a flight all around the area. Never got my pilot's license :(
 
2019-10-12 08:36:21 PM  
got my pilot's license in 1992, when i was 18.  last time i flew was 1994.
still can't believe ten peps took a chance to go with with  me.
 
2019-10-12 09:13:13 PM  
s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2019-10-13 05:28:14 AM  

SloppyFrenchKisser: [s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com image 664x443]


username checks o...o...oh my gawd
 
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