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(The Hill)   Detention won't cut it anymore. Time for monetary fines   (thehill.com) divider line
    More: Asinine  
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3947 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Jun 2019 at 9:24 PM (17 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



47 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2019-06-11 08:34:49 PM  
Not a bad idea, actually.  They should probably consider fining their teachers, too.
 
2019-06-11 08:40:55 PM  

Lucky LaRue: Not a bad idea, actually.  They should probably consider fining their teachers, too.


This sort of power in no way could backfire or be used itself to bully.
 
2019-06-11 08:42:36 PM  

palladiate: Lucky LaRue: Not a bad idea, actually.  They should probably consider fining their teachers, too.

This sort of power in no way could backfire or be used itself to bully.


Yeah, I have a feeling that this will blow up in someone's face quite spectacularly.
 
2019-06-11 08:45:43 PM  
There are some parents who actively encourage their children to be assholes to others

Yeah, they deserve a thousand dollar fine once in a while
 
2019-06-11 08:48:59 PM  
So:
Kid bullies because of shiatty home life.
School fines kid's parents.
Parents take it on on kid.
Bully takes it out tenfold on kid that turned him in.
 
2019-06-11 08:50:27 PM  

NeoCortex42: So:
Kid bullies because of shiatty home life.
School fines kid's parents.
Parents take it on on kid.
Bully takes it out tenfold on kid that turned him in.


Kids normally do not turn bullies in

They are too scared of the consequences

The way that schools catch bullies is because they see it happening
 
2019-06-11 09:00:03 PM  

cman: NeoCortex42: So:
Kid bullies because of shiatty home life.
School fines kid's parents.
Parents take it on on kid.
Bully takes it out tenfold on kid that turned him in.

Kids normally do not turn bullies in

They are too scared of the consequences

The way that schools catch bullies is because they see it happening


Maybe, but they can often only see one side of it and end up punishing the bullied instead of the bully. Also, the bully won't care about the detail. He'll take it out on the bully target just the same.
 
2019-06-11 09:02:40 PM  

NeoCortex42: cman: NeoCortex42: So:
Kid bullies because of shiatty home life.
School fines kid's parents.
Parents take it on on kid.
Bully takes it out tenfold on kid that turned him in.

Kids normally do not turn bullies in

They are too scared of the consequences

The way that schools catch bullies is because they see it happening

Maybe, but they can often only see one side of it and end up punishing the bullied instead of the bully. Also, the bully won't care about the detail. He'll take it out on the bully target just the same.


Well now there's money riding on the outcome of "he started it!" "Nuh uh, he did!"
 
2019-06-11 09:03:16 PM  

cman: NeoCortex42: So:
Kid bullies because of shiatty home life.
School fines kid's parents.
Parents take it on on kid.
Bully takes it out tenfold on kid that turned him in.

Kids normally do not turn bullies in

They are too scared of the consequences

The way that schools catch bullies is because they see it happening


Have things changed in 20 years? It was usually bullies turning in the kids they bullied. That was the overwhelming case when I was a peer mediator in high school.

Psychos know how to play a system to their benefit.
 
2019-06-11 09:05:24 PM  

palladiate: cman: NeoCortex42: So:
Kid bullies because of shiatty home life.
School fines kid's parents.
Parents take it on on kid.
Bully takes it out tenfold on kid that turned him in.

Kids normally do not turn bullies in

They are too scared of the consequences

The way that schools catch bullies is because they see it happening

Have things changed in 20 years? It was usually bullies turning in the kids they bullied. That was the overwhelming case when I was a peer mediator in high school.

Psychos know how to play a system to their benefit.


You went to a really farked up school
 
2019-06-11 09:31:46 PM  
Thulsa Doom, School Superintendent, had an idea involving a 'Tree of Woe'.
 
2019-06-11 09:36:09 PM  
When it stopped being OK to kick a bully's ass who deserved it, the school shootings began.

Not a coincidence.
 
2019-06-11 09:36:23 PM  
Scenario 1: The bully is rich.
The parents pay the $50-$313 fines out of a petty cash account, and the idea that rich people are immune to anything more than a token slap on the wrist punishment is reinforced. The bully learns that as a member of the nobility, they can be as much of an asshole as they wants.

Scenario 2: The bully is poor.
Parents, already struggling, get a stack of $313 fines that render them bankrupt and homeless. Siblings who had nothing to do with the bullying are dumped on the street as well.

Scenario 3: Rich bullies decide they get to control which peasants are allowed to grace their presence.
Take Pallidate's scenario above, but inflate it to the point that the psychos get to decide who's going to be homeless. Yikes.

Bullying is a huge problem, and it needs to be dealt with, but this is NOT the answer. Provided clear evidence of bullying, how about this:
1st offense: The bully is called into the office, reminded of what happens if he persists, and given a more standard punishment of detention. In other words, pretty much as now, but ONCE.
2nd offense: As above, but the parents get a letter sent home, and the detention is "sit in a room in school for both days of a weekend".
3rd offense: Replace that weekend in school with a weekend in jail.
 
2019-06-11 09:57:30 PM  
We think this will be brilliant. However, this will result in kids being beaten by their bad parents.
 
2019-06-11 10:00:50 PM  

SergeantObvious: When it stopped being OK to kick a bully's ass who deserved it, the school shootings began.

Not a coincidence.


Username checks out.

I'm eternally grateful to have had supportive parents who had my back when I needed to defend myself.

I was not allowed to start fights. If someone started the fight, my mom more or less told me that I need to make them regret it.

Never had any further problems from any kid I fought.
 
2019-06-11 10:03:53 PM  
Yes, as if shame weren't incentive enough for dipshiat parents to beat their kids.
 
2019-06-11 10:07:39 PM  

palladiate: cman: NeoCortex42: So:
Kid bullies because of shiatty home life.
School fines kid's parents.
Parents take it on on kid.
Bully takes it out tenfold on kid that turned him in.

Kids normally do not turn bullies in

They are too scared of the consequences

The way that schools catch bullies is because they see it happening

Have things changed in 20 years? It was usually bullies turning in the kids they bullied. That was the overwhelming case when I was a peer mediator in high school.

Psychos know how to play a system to their benefit.


That "zero tolerance" stuff started rolling out about halfway through high school. It was such that if someone started even an unprovoked fight, both kids got suspended.

It was a terrible system, and I can only imagine that it's gotten worse in the intervening decades since.
 
2019-06-11 10:08:00 PM  

trerro: Scenario 1: The bully is rich.
The parents pay the $50-$313 fines out of a petty cash account, and the idea that rich people are immune to anything more than a token slap on the wrist punishment is reinforced. The bully learns that as a member of the nobility, they can be as much of an asshole as they wants.

Scenario 2: The bully is poor.
Parents, already struggling, get a stack of $313 fines that render them bankrupt and homeless. Siblings who had nothing to do with the bullying are dumped on the street as well.

Scenario 3: Rich bullies decide they get to control which peasants are allowed to grace their presence.
Take Pallidate's scenario above, but inflate it to the point that the psychos get to decide who's going to be homeless. Yikes.

Bullying is a huge problem, and it needs to be dealt with, but this is NOT the answer. Provided clear evidence of bullying, how about this:
1st offense: The bully is called into the office, reminded of what happens if he persists, and given a more standard punishment of detention. In other words, pretty much as now, but ONCE.
2nd offense: As above, but the parents get a letter sent home, and the detention is "sit in a room in school for both days of a weekend".
3rd offense: Replace that weekend in school with a weekend in jail.


Yes clearly a 10 year old spending a weekend in jail is a great idea and far better then a $50 fine.
 
2019-06-11 10:18:56 PM  

NeoCortex42: So:
Kid bullies because of shiatty home life.
School fines kid's parents.
Parents take it on on kid.
Bully takes it out tenfold on kid that turned him in.


Exactly. In eight-or-so out of ten cases, this will simply exacerbate the problem.
 
2019-06-11 10:21:22 PM  

gar1013: SergeantObvious: When it stopped being OK to kick a bully's ass who deserved it, the school shootings began.

Not a coincidence.

Username checks out.

I'm eternally grateful to have had supportive parents who had my back when I needed to defend myself.

I was not allowed to start fights. If someone started the fight, my mom more or less told me that I need to make them regret it.

Never had any further problems from any kid I fought.


I really do think there is some association.  Bullying has moved more psychological vs physical so maybe making more people snap.
 
2019-06-11 10:27:45 PM  
In school suspension with the parent having to sit with their precious the entire time so they can enjoy their child uninterrupted.  All.day.long.

If the parent refuses, they can keep their kid at home with them. If the parent can't b/c "I have to work!' Perhaps it can be a learning experience where the parent has to explain to their precious that the family budget is now farkled - no little debbie cake for you.

Zero tolerance where the kid who got cold cocked also getting suspended?  That crap never should have been an option from the beginning. Somewhere, some PTA president's kid was a bully and a fearful principal knew they had to do something. By disciplining the bully and victim, it was easier to tell PTA lady some BS about everyone getting in trouble, much like everyone getting a trophy.
 
2019-06-11 10:34:40 PM  

pxlboy: palladiate: cman: NeoCortex42: So:
Kid bullies because of shiatty home life.
School fines kid's parents.
Parents take it on on kid.
Bully takes it out tenfold on kid that turned him in.

Kids normally do not turn bullies in

They are too scared of the consequences

The way that schools catch bullies is because they see it happening

Have things changed in 20 years? It was usually bullies turning in the kids they bullied. That was the overwhelming case when I was a peer mediator in high school.

Psychos know how to play a system to their benefit.

That "zero tolerance" stuff started rolling out about halfway through high school. It was such that if someone started even an unprovoked fight, both kids got suspended.

It was a terrible system, and I can only imagine that it's gotten worse in the intervening decades since.


If the kid wants to get expelled and you don't, but if you report him you both get expelled... well it doesn't take a class in game theory here.
 
2019-06-11 10:42:49 PM  

GummyBearOverlord: gar1013: SergeantObvious: When it stopped being OK to kick a bully's ass who deserved it, the school shootings began.

Not a coincidence.

Username checks out.

I'm eternally grateful to have had supportive parents who had my back when I needed to defend myself.

I was not allowed to start fights. If someone started the fight, my mom more or less told me that I need to make them regret it.

Never had any further problems from any kid I fought.

I really do think there is some association.  Bullying has moved more psychological vs physical so maybe making more people snap.


Yeah, I think modern bullying is closer to actual torture than we want to admit.
 
2019-06-11 10:46:29 PM  

trerro: Scenario 1: The bully is rich.
The parents pay the $50-$313 fines out of a petty cash account, and the idea that rich people are immune to anything more than a token slap on the wrist punishment is reinforced. The bully learns that as a member of the nobility, they can be as much of an asshole as they wants.

Scenario 2: The bully is poor.
Parents, already struggling, get a stack of $313 fines that render them bankrupt and homeless. Siblings who had nothing to do with the bullying are dumped on the street as well.

Scenario 3: Rich bullies decide they get to control which peasants are allowed to grace their presence.
Take Pallidate's scenario above, but inflate it to the point that the psychos get to decide who's going to be homeless. Yikes.

Bullying is a huge problem, and it needs to be dealt with, but this is NOT the answer. Provided clear evidence of bullying, how about this:
1st offense: The bully is called into the office, reminded of what happens if he persists, and given a more standard punishment of detention. In other words, pretty much as now, but ONCE.
2nd offense: As above, but the parents get a letter sent home, and the detention is "sit in a room in school for both days of a weekend".
3rd offense: Replace that weekend in school with a weekend in jail.


How about every kid gets an orienteering tour of the school, and a run-down of rules and policies.

1st offence - reminder of the rules and policies, some community service (cleaning the playground, etc), + letter to parents.
2nd offence - "this is your final warning"
3rd offence - publicly-announced* termination of enrolment with zero refunds, and a letter to surrounding schools.

I'm not a teacher, but I contract at a school. My observation is that bullies will do it because they a. don't have any idea of the consequences to themselves or the victims, and b. they believe they'll get away with it.

A previous school I worked at spent more time and effort on the bullies than it did on the victims - the bullies got all the love, care and understanding, thus reinforcing their belief that their behaviour would not have bad consequences, and the victims saw all the attention going to the bullies. So many parents got fed up with it and withdrew their children, that the board sacked the principal to stem the flow.

* hiding the reason/s, sweeping it under the carpet only makes it worse. The bully *must* face the consequences of their behaviour.
 
2019-06-11 11:03:23 PM  

palladiate: pxlboy: palladiate: cman: NeoCortex42: So:
Kid bullies because of shiatty home life.
School fines kid's parents.
Parents take it on on kid.
Bully takes it out tenfold on kid that turned him in.

Kids normally do not turn bullies in

They are too scared of the consequences

The way that schools catch bullies is because they see it happening

Have things changed in 20 years? It was usually bullies turning in the kids they bullied. That was the overwhelming case when I was a peer mediator in high school.

Psychos know how to play a system to their benefit.

That "zero tolerance" stuff started rolling out about halfway through high school. It was such that if someone started even an unprovoked fight, both kids got suspended.

It was a terrible system, and I can only imagine that it's gotten worse in the intervening decades since.

If the kid wants to get expelled and you don't, but if you report him you both get expelled... well it doesn't take a class in game theory here.


If you were involved in the fight in any way, even if you don't fight back, you both get kicked out regardless. It doesn't even matter if a teacher or administrator saw it.
 
2019-06-11 11:18:49 PM  

FarkingStan: We think this will be brilliant. However, this will result in kids being beaten by their bad parents.


We can fine them for that too.
 
2019-06-11 11:46:14 PM  
This is one of those experiments I'm happy to see another school district (or state) do before mine ever tries it. Maybe it works, maybe it backfires, and I'll cheer for its success, but I'll be damned if I want to be in any way involved in its first implementation.
 
2019-06-12 12:10:47 AM  
So rich kids will bully poor kids and laugh about it as their parents pay the negligible fine.
 
2019-06-12 12:10:56 AM  
Wanna know what happens when a lifelong bully never gets their comeuppance?

Exhibit A: current resident of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.
 
DVD
2019-06-12 12:34:27 AM  

trerro: Scenario 1: The bully is rich.
The parents pay the $50-$313 fines out of a petty cash account, and the idea that rich people are immune to anything more than a token slap on the wrist punishment is reinforced. The bully learns that as a member of the nobility, they can be as much of an asshole as they wants.

Scenario 2: The bully is poor.
Parents, already struggling, get a stack of $313 fines that render them bankrupt and homeless. Siblings who had nothing to do with the bullying are dumped on the street as well.

Scenario 3: Rich bullies decide they get to control which peasants are allowed to grace their presence.
Take Pallidate's scenario above, but inflate it to the point that the psychos get to decide who's going to be homeless. Yikes.

Bullying is a huge problem, and it needs to be dealt with, but this is NOT the answer. Provided clear evidence of bullying, how about this:
1st offense: The bully is called into the office, reminded of what happens if he persists, and given a more standard punishment of detention. In other words, pretty much as now, but ONCE.
2nd offense: As above, but the parents get a letter sent home, and the detention is "sit in a room in school for both days of a weekend".
3rd offense: Replace that weekend in school with a weekend in jail.


Ya know, logical thinking is often frowned upon here at Fark.  You might even get your post deleted for doing so. /s
 
2019-06-12 01:11:42 AM  
Look, the important thing is that the government has found another new & inventive way to take even more money from poor people, because that's their thing now.

Bullying will just become a rich-kid's game, but then again, wasn't it always?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2019-06-12 03:15:27 AM  
My kids are usually the bullied ones, and yep, they regularly get ISS/OSS.  But having an IEP means the school can be forced to provide a higher level of supervision.  Every time I get the call that one of my kids has been in a situation, my Weeners is "And where were the adults?"  This usually results in a bunch of excuses and another round of meetings.

Having to pay a lawyer as part of the monthly budget absolutely sucks, but at least the kids are all undefeated in their fight careers.
 
2019-06-12 03:36:49 AM  
This will be interesting when a foster child bullies someone.  Will the State of Wisconsin pony up the cash?
 
2019-06-12 07:30:00 AM  
I taught in a Title 1 school where a number of my students would miss 20 days of class, then show up, then disappear again for 20 days. That was some sort of window for when administration would get involved with the parents for truancy.

Policy was to contact parents if so many assignments did not get turned in, or so many days of class were missed. After one student showed up to school black-and-blue after a call home to their parents regarding a missed assignment, I pretty much determined to work it out with the kid from there on out. I brought it up to Administration and their councillor, and did the mandatory reporting thing, but nothing came of it.

Another time the PTA President's kid tried to get a group of his friends to beat the shiat out of another student in the class because he alerted me that the PTA Pres's kid had cheated on a test (which I verified from online records). I was basically told by administration that "they knew the kid, and he wasn't capable of harming a fly," and that I shouldn't worry.

I told the threatened student to go home early, contacted his parents, and let them know what had transpired that day, and that I recommended they not allow their child to return to school until the administration agreed to do something about the threat, in writing.

The administration never did, and that kid, one of the best in the class, never returned. The other kid received no discipline whatsoever over it, even though he had text messages on his phone asking two of his friends from another school to come over and help him kick a snitch's ass...

Another teacher at the school, whom I was paired with, was really well liked. He wasn't a trained teacher - he came from the tech sector. One day, after I finished some grading, I asked to meet with him to discuss all the kids that were currently at a C or lower. There were a number of kids that had just received 0s for not turning in assignments that I had been hounding them about for over a month - I had put packets together for the second time, and given them to the students, and let them know that they had to be completed for a grade. Anyway he looked at the names and told me

'You can't give him an F... he's a really good student, and he's smart. He should have an A"

I asked "He hasn't turned in all these assignments, how should I grade his nothing?"

He sighed, thought for a second, and then said "You're right. It's fine." We wrapped the meeting after discussing other things and I went home.

The next day, I went in to do some more grading, and I found that a handful of my grades for kids that had not turned in their assignment packets had been changed from 0s to 89s. I spoke to administration about it, carefully, and they were very supportive, had a meeting to talk about grades and problems in the class. I had folders prepared for each student with a grade lower than a C, why they weren't performing well (Whether it was related to behavior, missed classes, missed assignments), whether I recommended parent-teacher, student-parent-teacher, student-councillor, or other meetings, how they could increase their grade, and what extra steps we as teachers needed to provide to any willing students to get them up to speed. I was told the energy I put into the meeting was incredible, that they had never seen anyone care so much about the students, etc, and everyone assured me things would be done differently.

And then nothing changed. Not a single recommendation I made was followed through with. The teacher that was willing to alter records for students he thought were smart went on to receive a Teacher of the Year award from Microsoft and went to Spain as a reward trip.

I quit teaching and left the field entirely after that.

So many more stories like these...
 
2019-06-12 07:39:00 AM  
While I don't have a problem with this in principle, it seems like there are just too many pitfalls and it's doomed to fail.
 
2019-06-12 07:40:46 AM  
So they think they can bully the bully's bully parents into paying a fine for bullying? You don't know whose dad you're talking to! I dare you! I dare you to do it, do something and see what happens you frickin crybaby.
 
2019-06-12 07:51:52 AM  
I'm going to really regret naming my son Wooly.
 
2019-06-12 08:07:18 AM  
Anyway my point of that long post was basically that for any system to work, you need people to care, pay attention, and take action.

When function requires several chains in the link, if any one fails, then the system does not work.

Education is an institutional system with many, many layers of links that are broken. It serves nearly everyone in the country, and therefore impacts everyone in the country. And because we've built our professional workforce on and around this form of childcare, our entire economy is beholden to it.

Politicians, therefore, need to talk about it, and act like they are doing something about fixing it. Their only recourse is to pass laws which then must be enforced.

Administrators must enforce policies directed at them at the federal and state levels, as well as district, county, and city levels. Where there are problems, they have to work with their teachers and the kids (if the teachers are not successful, for whatever reason).

Teachers have to know their students and have relationships with them to be able to reach them, if the kids are willing to be reached. Where they are not willing to work with their teachers, the teachers have to work with parents.

Parents have to have the time available, and a good enough relationship with their kids to be able to influence their behavior. If you have kids that aren't listening to their parents because they beat them, are regularly stoned or high, are absent, or are too busy working three jobs to feed, house, and cloth their kids, or have any number of other problems creating barriers to that relationship with their kids, then that last line of defence can do nothing either.

When all these layers collapse upon themselves because of their complexity, the police are called in as a blunt instrument to enforce the laws the politicians made to placate the overworked parents that are discontented with the job the exhausted and underpaid teachers are doing in raising their kids, which is made impossible because administrators don't have the time to pay attention to individual kids or properly support their teachers because of the increasing mass of legal obligations they have from the policies and laws being passed by politicians to fix the problem... and the cycle repeats.
 
2019-06-12 08:30:07 AM  
Taxing overworked, absent, addicted, or negligent parents because their children are being mean to other children is a solution only a politician could come up with, and one that is mind numbingly short sighted.

Because those are the parents that don't have the time, relationship, or emotional capacity to do anything about their misbehaving kids, and they are the same parents that cannot afford the money that will then be required of them.

They are also the same set of parents that are likely to do something harmful or unproductive as a result of needing to stop the loss of income from further jeopardizing the stability of their family.

What the entire system needs is more money, more time, more love, and more relationship.

The kids need mentors and role models to model good behavior and forge relationships where parents are unable or unwilling to meet their emotional needs.

The parents need more money for less work so they can be involved in their child's life, more social services so they can kick their habit, more parental training or counselling so they can learn how to effectively reach their own kids, and more support from the community so they aren't isolated and overwhelmed.

The teachers need more pay, smaller classes, and more latitude in their ability to simply teach a subject without also having to teach classes with cross-credit, dual-credit, AP credit, high-stakes-test focus, leadership focus, and documentation which becomes so onerous they spend more time on documentation to meet regulatory compliance than they do teaching.

Etc etc etc.
 
2019-06-12 08:45:26 AM  

FarkingStan: Because those are the parents that don't have the time, relationship, or emotional capacity to do anything about their misbehaving kids


I don't agree. If you don't have a few minutes a day to talk to your children about values, and demonstrate those values in the way you deal with others, then your children will be better off without you.

Better the uncertain but hopeful outcomes of foster home or state institutions, then the certain outcomes of indifferent parents.

I agree with most of the rest of your post, though.
 
2019-06-12 09:13:46 AM  

ol' gormsby: I don't agree. If you don't have a few minutes a day to talk to your children about values, and demonstrate those values in the way you deal with others, then your children will be better off without you.

Better the uncertain but hopeful outcomes of foster home or state institutions, then the certain outcomes of indifferent parents.

I agree with most of the rest of your post, though.


I guess I'm not sure how you disagree with me - If the proposed solution is to fine parents that have kids that bully, and most bullies have broken relationships with their parents, and most of those parents need a solution that enables them to strengthen their relationships with their children so they can impact them and change their behavior, then shouldn't we propose solutions that do ... that?

Like provide counselling, addiction treatment, increased pay (and therefore increased availability for their kids), and etc?

I propose that in most situations, fining the parents of bullies may actually increase the toxicity of the environment that led to the behavior in the first place.
 
2019-06-12 11:54:50 AM  

NeoCortex42: cman: NeoCortex42: So:
Kid bullies because of shiatty home life.
School fines kid's parents.
Parents take it on on kid.
Bully takes it out tenfold on kid that turned him in.

Kids normally do not turn bullies in

They are too scared of the consequences

The way that schools catch bullies is because they see it happening

Maybe, but they can often only see one side of it and end up punishing the bullied instead of the bully. Also, the bully won't care about the detail. He'll take it out on the bully target just the same.


^^^^^^^
THIS

My cousin was being bullied, was going on right in the classroom. One day kid kept kicking his chair and my cousin kept saying something to the teacher to get it to stop. Teacher wouldn't do anything about it, just told him to go sit down and do his work. Finally, cousin got tired of it, turned around, and told kid off. Teacher gave my cousin detention for yelling in class and swearing.

Cousin came home that day, put a gun in his mouth, and pulled trigger
We buried him the day before his birthday, he was 12yo

Been finding out that this has been going on a LOOOONNNGGG time but the teachers and admin for the middle school couldn't be bothered to do anything about it. He was the 2nd kid from this school to kill himself in the past year (other was by hanging I believe).

Hope teacher can't sleep at night. However, since she didn't give a S*** then, I doubt she gives a S*** now....
 
2019-06-12 12:08:41 PM  
CSB: when I was 10, my parents were in a terrible car accident. The guy who hit them was killed, and my mom was crippled and in the hospital for 6 months. My dad was also injured badly, but he never left the hospital, so I couldn't be home.

I don't know how this was arranged, but I ended up staying at my classmates houses during that time. One day I'd be here, the next there, back and forth, for half a year.

I didn't have friends, only bullies. So there was no escape from the Hell that school was because now I'm sleeping in the same house (or room) as the bully. And of course at school everyone would ask what I'm like, and whether they were picking up something that happened or were lying entirely, the whole school was now in on it, and always had daily fresh material.

However, I got to witness what the lives were like of these bullies. Alcoholic parents, negligent parents, spousal abuse, rotten siblings. Many of them had perfect privileged lives and we're just bullies for no good reason. Others, the reason for their own torment was visible, but still they were inexcusably cruel at school.

One kid, his father actually sat down with him and trained him, gave him pointers on how to be a more effective bully. He would literally workshop with him on how to be meaner than he already was. "No no, don't call his mother a slut. Call his sister a whore. You want him to cry. say it like this..."
 
DuX
2019-06-12 12:37:42 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2019-06-12 01:06:13 PM  
FarkingStan:
I propose that in most situations, fining the parents of bullies may actually increase the toxicity of the environment that led to the behavior in the first place.

That is likely the point, actually.   I'm imagining whoever thought of this fining policy was bullied themselves, and the goal is to get the bully's parents to beat the shiat out of them even more.  It's a win/win for the victim that way.

If the parents beat the bully halfway to death, there's a visible consequence for the bullying.  The victim then has leverage to suggest the bully lay-off, or get turned in again and take another beating the victim himself may be unable to dish for any reason.

If the parents beat the bully all the way to death, well, the problem is solved and there's a clear villain to take the fall for the murder.  The victim can move on.  Either way, the victim wins.

//seriously, i hate anti-bully culture.  Learning to cope with adversity is a core life-skill we should all have and the new generation is severely lacking.  Let's see little Declan's participation-trophy get him into college or get him a decent job where he won't go eat a bullet the first time he gets talked down to by a supervisor.
 
2019-06-12 07:25:50 PM  

SergeantObvious: When it stopped being OK to kick a bully's ass who deserved it, the school shootings began.

Not a coincidence.


what, exactly, is your problem?
 
2019-06-12 08:38:58 PM  

Ubisoft is ISIS: SergeantObvious: When it stopped being OK to kick a bully's ass who deserved it, the school shootings began.

Not a coincidence.

what, exactly, is your problem?


School shootings, and the torment that leads to them.
 
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