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(Gizmodo)   The answer, my friend, is blowing in the wind...and apparently so is the microplastic   (earther.gizmodo.com) divider line
    More: Scary, Plastic, tiny plastic particles, Eye, Wind, plastic particles, Marine debris, team of researchers, Pyrnes Mountains of France stand  
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777 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Apr 2019 at 1:42 AM (9 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2019-04-15 08:51:08 PM  
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2019-04-15 10:18:19 PM  
The ants are your friends.
They're blowing in the wind.
 
2019-04-15 10:18:42 PM  
The ants, sir, are blowing in the wind.
 
2019-04-16 02:36:26 AM  
Am I safe yet from the gay frogs?
 
2019-04-16 02:40:15 AM  
The original H2G2 radio version included a bit about the planet having a geologic layer of used shoes. We're well on our way to doing that with plastic.
 
2019-04-16 03:14:59 AM  
I read two articles of environmentalists arguing with each other over the usual stuff recently, and one point struck me that this article illustrates: with our society, of it wasn't CO2 it would be something else. Maybe insect population crashes would upset the ecological balance, maybe we would nuke each other in the end, maybe something else. There have been past failures and collapses, but also a certain level of life has been sustained for a couple thousand years in many places. Our society is fundamentally much more unstable, because it is built on exponential growth.

The plastics are absurd - they are great materials in a practical sense, as long as you don't see the chain of how they are made and the chain of what becomes of them after they are gotten rid of. They have such great benefits and seemingly no huge costs, because the costs are all hidden. They are AMAZING materials for preserving food or other things, light as can be, keep things good for a very long time, don't break, resist environmental damage like wetness, just crazy good materials. That last nearly forever and become a part of the water and soil for all time.

I don't know what the answer is, but I'm increasingly thinking it involves stopping doing all of this stuff. The question is what we do then instead. We need degrowth, I guess. I don't know if we can do that any other way but chaotically (by collapse), but I sure hope so.
 
2019-04-16 04:54:28 AM  
Yes, and how many times must the plastic bags fly, before they are forever banned?
 
2019-04-16 07:21:34 AM  

adamatari: They have such great benefits and seemingly no huge costs, because the costs are all hidden.


Yep, primary manufacturers dump most of their waste into the Pacific.

Good thing we don't rely on ocean organisms for anything important, like oxygen...

Earth will always support life...but it can go a LONG time without supporting multi-cellular life.
 
2019-04-16 10:37:10 AM  
It's not surprising that soft rock would get blown around, the same as hard rock is. Sand, dust, and pollen are blown great distances.
 
2019-04-16 01:01:08 PM  
Idea for a scam: microplastic repeller to keep the air in your home clean. Just a box you plug in with an LED and a filter that doens't collect anything, thus proving the device is repelling harmful plastics.
 
2019-04-16 01:07:19 PM  
How about microplastic with metal?

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