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(PennLive)   Ah those annoying robocalls. Why do we get so many of them and how do we stop them?   (pennlive.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Telephone call, Telephone number, Telephone, Telephone exchange, inaccurate phone number, Mobile phone, telephone calls, half of all mobile phone  
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303 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 15 Apr 2019 at 9:16 AM (9 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2019-04-15 08:52:09 AM  
Originally, robo callers were proselytizers of religion and went door to door and stood in market places rousing rabbles.


Then the Romans invented crucifixion.
 
2019-04-15 09:32:46 AM  
Because of VOIP and you can't.
 
2019-04-15 09:33:44 AM  
I have very system good for stopping robocalleds.Send cash by wire and stop robo calls now
 
2019-04-15 09:40:58 AM  
 
2019-04-15 09:45:04 AM  
We get them because VOIP systems make it insanely cheap to make bulk calls, including international calls. . .so someone can sit in a boiler room in Mumbai and have 1000 people being paid shiat wages as a robodialer makes thousands upon thousands of calls, connecting ones where the person actually picks up with someone in the call center.

Also, we get them because phone companies have no financial incentive to stop them, it would cost money to come up with a solution and might cost them some business, so they would rather shrug their shoulders and let people deal with it.

The fact that these so easily are international means that State or Federal laws that would regulate or prosecute these calls are pretty toothless.  The person on the other end might not even be in the same hemisphere as you.
 
2019-04-15 09:45:47 AM  
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2019-04-15 09:48:23 AM  
I have an app (Group Ringtone) that allows me to set a default ring for all calls as Silent, then a group ringtone for any group I delineate, like my "Contact list".

So now, if you are not one of my Contacts, my phone simply will not ring (or rather will ring silent). No need to screen anything, no need to block anything and everything.  Heck, if I am not looking at my phone, I will never know the call came in unless I go to see how many "spam suspected" calls I got that day.

If you leave a message and you are legit, I will add you to my contacts so the next time you call I can hear it and (maybe) pick up.

One a month I hit update to add any new Contacts to my delineated group.
ta-da!
 
2019-04-15 09:50:07 AM  
Meh, if I don't recognize the number I let it go right to vmail. If caller doesn't leave a vmail I assume it was a robo caller and then block that number. Life is too short.
 
2019-04-15 10:01:09 AM  
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2019-04-15 10:08:15 AM  

vudukungfu: Originally, robo callers were proselytizers of religion and went door to door and stood in market places rousing rabbles.


Then the Romans invented crucifixion.


Then invented unintended consequences.
 
2019-04-15 10:19:48 AM  
Sorry, but you can't completely. The FCC is trying to get phone companies to do more to prevent robocalls and to offer verified Caller ID services that would help prevent spoofing.

There are companies that advertise on the Intratubes, on their company websites that they can provide blocks of  local phone numbers in any market they serve. In other words, they are participating in felony crimes. But of course the FCC won't imprison anyone....
 
2019-04-15 10:26:45 AM  

Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: Sorry, but you can't completely. The FCC is trying to get phone companies to do more to prevent robocalls and to offer verified Caller ID services that would help prevent spoofing.

There are companies that advertise on the Intratubes, on their company websites that they can provide blocks of  local phone numbers in any market they serve. In other words, they are participating in felony crimes. But of course the FCC won't imprison anyone....


You think spoofers are actually buying blocks of real phone numbers?
 
2019-04-15 10:37:32 AM  

BMFPitt: Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: Sorry, but you can't completely. The FCC is trying to get phone companies to do more to prevent robocalls and to offer verified Caller ID services that would help prevent spoofing.

There are companies that advertise on the Intratubes, on their company websites that they can provide blocks of  local phone numbers in any market they serve. In other words, they are participating in felony crimes. But of course the FCC won't imprison anyone....

You think spoofers are actually buying blocks of real phone numbers?


I think businesses are selling blocks of phone numbers they own to parties that use them illegally and the sellers know that illegal behavior is why their product is bought and sold.
 
2019-04-15 10:40:06 AM  
NoMoRobo (paid) does a pretty good job. I also have AT&T call protect which seems to block some stuff that NoMoRobo misses.  It's a hard problem to solve unfortunately.
 
2019-04-15 10:44:06 AM  

Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: BMFPitt: Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: Sorry, but you can't completely. The FCC is trying to get phone companies to do more to prevent robocalls and to offer verified Caller ID services that would help prevent spoofing.

There are companies that advertise on the Intratubes, on their company websites that they can provide blocks of  local phone numbers in any market they serve. In other words, they are participating in felony crimes. But of course the FCC won't imprison anyone....

You think spoofers are actually buying blocks of real phone numbers?

I think businesses are selling blocks of phone numbers they own to parties that use them illegally and the sellers know that illegal behavior is why their product is bought and sold.


Why on earth would they do that? It's trivial just to lie about what your number is. The robo-callers are using numbers in foreign countries that don't care and then just lying about what number they called you from.  The latest craze it to use your own area-code + exchange to make it look like you're being called from your own city.  They do this on the fly with code.
 
2019-04-15 10:44:21 AM  

Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: I think businesses are selling blocks of phone numbers they own to parties that use them illegally and the sellers know that illegal behavior is why their product is bought and sold.


I'm curious as to what you think "spoofing" means.
 
2019-04-15 10:56:20 AM  

BMFPitt: Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: I think businesses are selling blocks of phone numbers they own to parties that use them illegally and the sellers know that illegal behavior is why their product is bought and sold.

I'm curious as to what you think "spoofing" means.


From the FCC:

Caller ID spoofing is when a caller deliberately falsifies the information transmitted to your caller ID display to disguise their identity.

What is neighbor spoofing?

Robocallers use neighbor spoofing, which displays a phone number similar to your own on your caller ID, to increase the likelihood that you will answer the call. To help combat neighbor spoofing, the FCC is urging the phone industry to adopt a robust caller ID authentication system.



Considering I have looked up spoofed calls, found the websites of the owners of a block of numbers that contained the spoofed number and found advertising on the website that states the company can provide blocks of local market numbers to marketers that make it appear they are calling locally, it's clear that US businesses are making money helping generate illegal marketing calls.
 
2019-04-15 11:07:22 AM  

Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: To help combat neighbor spoofing, the FCC is urging the phone industry to adopt a robust caller ID authentication system.


They shouldn't urge, they should mandate.  (Obviously they'd need Congress to let them mandate, which really would be a great campaign issue.)

Considering I have looked up spoofed calls, found the websites of the owners of a block of numbers that contained the spoofed number and found advertising on the website that states the company can provide blocks of local market numbers to marketers that make it appear they are calling locally, it's clear that US businesses are making money helping generate illegal marketing calls.

Law of averages, sure.  There are a lot of those services, and they own a lot of numbers.  But as has already been asked, why would any scammer bother paying for these numbers?  The entire point of spoofing is that you don't have to pay for those numbers.
 
2019-04-15 11:26:42 AM  

BMFPitt: Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: To help combat neighbor spoofing, the FCC is urging the phone industry to adopt a robust caller ID authentication system.

They shouldn't urge, they should mandate.  (Obviously they'd need Congress to let them mandate, which really would be a great campaign issue.)

Considering I have looked up spoofed calls, found the websites of the owners of a block of numbers that contained the spoofed number and found advertising on the website that states the company can provide blocks of local market numbers to marketers that make it appear they are calling locally, it's clear that US businesses are making money helping generate illegal marketing calls.

Law of averages, sure.  There are a lot of those services, and they own a lot of numbers.  But as has already been asked, why would any scammer bother paying for these numbers?  The entire point of spoofing is that you don't have to pay for those numbers.


I think your use of the word definition is appropriate.

A spoofed Caller ID name and number on my phone can be produced by code or by buying it. I just object to one being treated with outrage while the other makes money for shareholders.
 
2019-04-15 11:28:24 AM  
I only take calls from exactly three people.  Everyone else, I swipe left.  I don't do business with any companies that call me as a matter of routine (such as some prescription services.)

If I get a call, and it's not identified as one of the three people I care about, I just swipe left now, or maybe just ignore it entirely.  The phone is for my convenience.  I'm down to about three robo-calls a week, sometimes less, which is far fewer than when I tried the "do not call" pointlessness.
 
2019-04-15 11:38:53 AM  
As long as phone companies make money from robocalls they'll never stop them. Follow the money. Sure, spammers make money off of 1 in a thousand calls but the phone company makes money on every call.
 
2019-04-15 11:59:56 AM  
I get 10-12 a week
 
2019-04-15 12:16:44 PM  

Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: A spoofed Caller ID name and number on my phone can be produced by code or by buying it.


Buying it and spoofing are mutually exclusive things.  100% of scam calls are spoofing.  The companies that buy numbers are just creating off-site call centers.

I just object to one being treated with outrage while the other makes money for shareholders.

1) Scammers spoof numbers
2) ???
3) Profit for shareholders
 
2019-04-15 12:24:43 PM  
I don't get any. Ha. I've opted out of everything. Also I give out fake phone numbers.
 
2019-04-15 01:29:22 PM  

cfreak: NoMoRobo (paid) does a pretty good job. I also have AT&T call protect which seems to block some stuff that NoMoRobo misses.  It's a hard problem to solve unfortunately.


Nah.  New global law:  life imprisonment for a robocalling first offense.   Penalties increase exponentially after that.

Problem will go away pretty quick.
 
2019-04-15 01:32:25 PM  

PunGent: cfreak: NoMoRobo (paid) does a pretty good job. I also have AT&T call protect which seems to block some stuff that NoMoRobo misses.  It's a hard problem to solve unfortunately.

Nah.  New global law:  life imprisonment for a robocalling first offense.   Penalties increase exponentially after that.

Problem will go away pretty quick.


Prison Guard: State your number, prisoner.
Prisoner: 568-23547
Prison Guard: You used that one this morning. State your REAL number, prisoner.
Prisoner: Hold please.
 
2019-04-15 01:33:46 PM  

PunGent: cfreak: NoMoRobo (paid) does a pretty good job. I also have AT&T call protect which seems to block some stuff that NoMoRobo misses.  It's a hard problem to solve unfortunately.

Nah.  New global law:  life imprisonment for a robocalling first offense.   Penalties increase exponentially after that.

Problem will go away pretty quick.


Farker PunGent: President of the World has spoken!

/ please decree more beer next
// and boobies. Those are good too
 
2019-04-15 02:07:24 PM  
I've been answering and trolling robocalls.

At work, I got one guy to admit he was a scammer and then told him this was a state government line. He told me to have a good day. That was a month ago and I haven't had one since. I used to get three or four a week.

On my cell, I have different scenarios: a guy living under the over pass (for which I was called a ice of shiat), trying to get my wife/daughter to the hospital to have a baby, saying hello over and over (wasted 2 minutes of someone's time), telling someone who wanted to extend my car warranty that I only ever had a bicycle, etc.

I only do this if I have the time, but it is humorous to hear someone finally catching on that I am farking with them and then hear their response.
 
2019-04-15 02:22:08 PM  
We used to get calls for chimney sweeping but haven't gotten them in a while. I'm patiently waiting for a chminey sweeping robocall so that I can make the appointment. And when they come out to clean our chimney I'll point out that we don' thave one.
 
2019-04-15 08:32:52 PM  
I get maybe 2 a month (if that). I do not answer my phone if I don't recognize the number. If the call is 'real' they will leave a message.
 
2019-04-15 11:11:52 PM  
I started doing something a little different with spoofed neighbor calls, I answer as if it's my son calling me,  they hang up every time.

There's a slight chance they will call from a known number, and there's no way they would know it. So any sales pitch would be over my claims that they are scammers.
 
2019-04-16 05:50:01 AM  
You shouldn't have to pay for incoming calls.
Same with email, it should be sender pays.
And I know these two things will never happen.
 
2019-04-16 06:00:10 AM  

bratface: I get maybe 2 a month (if that). I do not answer my phone if I don't recognize the number. If the call is 'real' they will leave a message.


Same here, bratface. Since I didn't pick up any unfamiliar calls, I only get maximum 5 calls each month from them. Before that, I regularly get 5-10 calls each and every week! That's very annoying. Now they might get my number off their list. lol. By the way, I have just read an article about this topic at https://www.whycall.me/news/consum​er-w​ins-massive-229500-robocall-lawsuit-ag​ainst-time-warner-cable/. Well, anyone think about suing them? XD
 
2019-04-16 08:47:28 AM  

Dick Gozinya: Because of VOIP and you can't.


Sure you can.

Look up SIT tones.  You know, the boo BOO BEEEE you get when you call a dead number.  Record them at the beginning of your outgoing message and the robo dialers will drop your number from the list.

Thanks to a piece of work of a coworker I was getting about 30 a day on weekends and about 15 every weekday.  SIT tones knocked that down to 1 or 2 a week after a couple of months.

There can be a downside though.  Banks and credit card companies have robodialers for their customer support and collections people so if they call their computer will tag your account with "disconnected phone number."
 
2019-04-16 02:28:12 PM  

bad_madelyn: bratface: I get maybe 2 a month (if that). I do not answer my phone if I don't recognize the number. If the call is 'real' they will leave a message.

Same here, bratface. Since I didn't pick up any unfamiliar calls, I only get maximum 5 calls each month from them. Before that, I regularly get 5-10 calls each and every week! That's very annoying. Now they might get my number off their list. lol. By the way, I have just read an article about this topic at https://www.whycall.me/news/consume​r-wins-massive-229500-robocall-lawsuit​-against-time-warner-cable/. Well, anyone think about suing them? XD


That was back in 2015. I can't remember when it was but I remember reading a story about a guy who also sued & won a boatload of money. I think it was in the early 2000's. But as in the woman in the above link, she went after a known entity not some 'boiler room' operation in Russia. What I wish the big shot experts would do is figure out a way to send those calls back to them.
 
2019-04-16 02:48:47 PM  

bratface: That was back in 2015. I can't remember when it was but I remember reading a story about a guy who also sued & won a boatload of money. I think it was in the early 2000's. But as in the woman in the above link, she went after a known entity not some 'boiler room' operation in Russia. What I wish the big shot experts would do is figure out a way to send those calls back to them.


What they need to do is create a way of validating caller ID.
That's nowhere near as easy as it sounds, at least without impacting performance, but that is what needs to happen.
 
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